Library of Congress

Counter Parties in D.C. Surrounding the Inauguration
What to do this week if you’re not fired up about Trump’s election

Capitol staffers cheered from balconies as hundreds of Washington, D.C.,-area high school students march to protest the election of Donald Trump in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As workers toil to return the National Mall and its surroundings to its pre-inaugural state, a crowd estimated in the hundreds of thousands is expected to gather on Saturday for the Women’s March on Washington.

And that’s not the only event around Washington this week for venting negative feelings toward the Trump presidency.

Patience and Perspective: Inauguration Memories and Advice
This inauguration will be the first for nearly one quarter of Congress.

Vermont Sen Patrick J. Leahy, right, takes photos of the media camped out in the Rotunda for President Barack Obama’s inauguration ceremony in 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The inauguration festivities that will take over the Capitol on Friday will be a new experience for nearly a quarter of Congress.

Roughly a dozen senators and nearly 120 House members will be attending their first presidential inauguration as a member of Congress when President-elect Donald Trump is sworn in. But luckily, they can defer to more senior members for advice on how to navigate the chaotic day.

Global Events Drive Inauguration Security
Capitol’s top law enforcement officials consider new threats

Larkin, left, and Irving, right, must weigh security versus access when it comes to the inauguration. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Threats, both domestic and foreign, are driving some of the logistics of the 58th presidential inauguration as the Capitol’s top law enforcement officers prepare to secure the public and members of all three branches of government at the same time in the same place.

Recent events in France and Germany, where terrorists drove trucks into crowds of people, pose a new type of threat to consider when handling planning for the day, Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Frank Larkin said.

Rick Perry Can Help Launch the Next Great Era in American Energy
Trump‘s Energy secretary pick cuts through bureaucracy

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, President-elect Trump's nominee for Energy secretary, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell during a photo op in the Capitol on Jan. 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Texas and energy are synonymous with one another. Most Americans probably think of the Lone Star State as an oil and gas economy with a lot of heft, and for good reason. The industry supports tens of thousands of jobs in the state and helps power one-third of the country.

But what many don’t know is that my state’s energy dominance isn’t confined to oil and gas alone — in recent years, Texas has become a leader in renewables, thanks in large part to former Gov. Rick Perry.  

Price Faces Tough Questions on Stock Trading, Health Care Law

Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., takes his seat before the start of his confirmation hearing in the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Tom Price sought in a contentious hearing Wednesday to defend his purchases of medical stocks against Democratic charges of conflicts of interest.

Price told Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, the ranking Democrat on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee that held the hearing, that he bought Australian biotech Innate Immunotherapeutics shares after talking with Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., about the company. Collins serves as a director of the company. That raises questions about whether that would be a potential violation of the STOCK Act which prohibits lawmakers from benefiting from insider information or ethics rules. However, Price said he did not receive information that was not public.

Mulvaney: I Paid $15,583 in Back Taxes for Household Employee

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., participates in the Citizens Against Government Waste press conference to release the 2016 Congressional Pig Book report on pork spending on Wednesday, April 13, 2016, at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, the staunch conservative nominated to become President-elect Donald Trump’s budget chief, failed to pay more than $15,000 in federal payroll taxes for a past household employee, he told the Senate Budget Committee in a questionnaire.

“I have come to learn, during the confirmation review process, that I failed to pay FICA and federal and state unemployment taxes on a household employee for the years 2000-2004,” Mulvaney, R-S.C., wrote in a section of the document, obtained by Roll Call on Wednesday. “Upon discovery of that shortfall, I paid the federal taxes.”

Report: Gabbard Makes Secret Trip to Syria
The congresswoman took a 'fact-finding' trip to Syria aiming to end the six-year civil war

A spokeswoman for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, shown here at a rally held by labor, environmental, and consumer groups in November, confirmed the congresswoman’s trip to Syria on Wednesday. (Tom Wiliiams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Hawaii Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard was reported to be returning on Wednesday from a secret trip to Syria, which her aides described as a “fact-finding” mission to end the conflict there.

Gabbard spokeswoman Emily Latimer said the representative “felt it was important to meet with a number of individuals and groups including religious leaders, humanitarian workers, refugees and government and community leaders,” Foreign Policy reported.

Sparring Over Price Takes Center Stage
Has first of two confirmation hearings

Rep. Tom Price, seen here meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, faces his first confirmation hearing Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate chamber might be the quietest place in Washington this week (except for the House chamber).

The Senate’s keeping the floor lights dimmed until inauguration morning on Friday, and the Senate GOP is forgoing the usual weekly media stakeout by the Ohio Clock in the Capitol, citing extra access restrictions this week.

44 Sitting Members of Congress Have Accepted Donations From Trump
Group includes prominent lawmakers from both parties

Arizona Sen. John McCain, whom President-elect Donald Trump once criticized, has received the most donations of any current lawmaker from Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much has been said about how Vice President-elect Mike Pence, with his 12 years as a congressman, could be incoming President Donald Trump’s bridge to Congress. But Trump has his own ties to the Hill, in the form of nearly two decades worth of political contributions to sitting members of the House and Senate on both sides of the aisle.

Trump has donated to the campaigns of 44 current members of Congress, according to a Roll Call review of Federal Election Commission electronic records that are available since 1997. Nineteen of those members are in the Senate, and 25 are in the House.

Senators to Watch as Trump Era Begins
Rank-and-file senators likely to be key players in 115th Congress

Georgia Sen. David Perdue, left, and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin III are both senators to watch. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republicans may have full control in Washington, but the Senate remains the Senate, which means it’s the place where rank-and-file Democrats and Republicans retain the most clout and potential for influence. Here are the key senators from outside of the top echelons of the leadership structures to watch as the 115th Congress gets underway.

The moderate from Maine will be the first person to watch on any contentious votes, particularly on budget reconciliation votes that aim to repeal parts of the 2010 health care law. She has, for instance, been among the small number of Republicans opposing efforts to tie the GOP health care plans to stopping federal funding of Planned Parenthood.