Diane Black

Trump and Co. Acknowledge Health Care Elephant in Rose Garden
President has nary a negative word about GOP senators

President Donald Trump congratulates House Republicans in the White House Rose Garden after they passed legislation aimed at repealing and replacing Barack Obama's 2010 health care law. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump and most House Republicans, just minutes after they passed a measure to replace the 2010 health law, took a victory lap in the White House Rose Garden.

At the same time, few ignored the elephant in the garden: the United States Senate, where lawmakers have signaled they intend to make significant changes. 

The Important Connection Between Governors and Congress
A first look at the gubernatorial race ratings for 2017-18

South Dakota Rep. Krisit Noem is a candidate for governor in 2018 and leaves behind a safe Republican seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Washington, it’s easy to ignore governors as distant rulers over far away lands. But now is a good time to start paying attention to what’s happening in state races.

Voters in 38 states (including nine of the 10 most populated) will elect a governor over the next two years, and the results have a direct connection to Capitol Hill. The large number of races give aspiring (or weary) members an opportunity to leave the House, and consequently, leave behind potentially vulnerable open seats. And governors in 28 of those states will have a role (specifically veto power) in the next round of redistricting, which will impact what party controls the House in the next decade. 

Falling Tree Kills AOC Employee Near Capitol
Matthew McClanahan was working on pipe near Cannon House Office Building

The Architect of the Capitol said that Matthew McClanahan was working on a pipe when a section of the tree fell. (Courtesy Suzanne Kennedy)

A falling tree killed an Architect of the Capitol employee working on a project Tuesday near the Cannon House Office Building.

“It is with deep sorrow that we announce the passing of Architect of the Capitol employee Matthew McClanahan following an accident on the U.S. Capitol Grounds,” architect Stephen T. Ayers said in a statement.

Wynonna Judd Rips Her Backup Singers During Grammys on the Hill
But Trump was ripped the most over proposed art funding cuts

Wynonna Judd was joined on stage by members of Congress. (Alex Gangitano/ CQ Roll Call)

Just when you thought the American public was the hardest on politicians, country singer Wynonna Judd took the cake.

“Loosen up your ties,” the singer said. “Come on, big babies.”

Take Five: Drew Ferguson
Georgia Republican doesn’t want to be a politician

Georgia Rep. Drew Ferguson was a dentist who served as mayor of a small town in Georgia before running for the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Drew Ferguson, 50, came to Congress after serving as mayor of West Point, Georgia, for eight years. The Republican freshman talks to HOH about getting into politics, becoming a dentist, and advocating term limits.

Q: What made you want to be a politician?

Republicans Reverse Course, Open Door To Another Health Care Debate
Ryan: ‘We are all going to work together and listen together until we get this right’

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., speaks during his press conference to announce the canceled vote on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Friday, March 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON, JOE WILLIAMS and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Tuesday he isn’t abandoning his quest to overhaul the 2010 health care law, even after his first attempt to pass such legislation ended in catastrophic failure on Friday.

Key Conservatives Come Around on GOP Health Plan
Republican Study Committee leaders sign off, but Freedom Caucus still wary

Walker and several members of the Republican Study Committee voiced their support for the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By JOHN T. BENNETT And LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Several key Republicans on Friday endorsed the health care overhaul bill crafted by GOP leaders and the White House, saying President Donald Trump had agreed to changes they favored minutes earlier during an Oval Office meeting. With a vote on the so-called American Health Care Act scheduled for this coming Thursday in the House, the news was welcomed by supporters of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

3 GOP Dissenters as Budget Committee Passes Health Care Plan
Reps. Sanford, Brat, Palmer vote against sending to full House

Rep. Dave Brat, R-Va., was one of three House Freedom Caucus members to vote against the health care plan in the Budget Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Budget Committee on Thursday approved 19-17 a motion to send the Republican legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care to the full House for consideration.

Republican Reps. Mark Sanford of South Carolina, Dave Brat of Virginia, and Gary Palmer of Alabama — all members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus — voted against the motion, despite a plea from panel chairwoman Diane Black of Tennessee.

What the GOP Wants to Keep or Gut from Obamacare
One Republican health plan is heading toward the House floor next week

GOP leaders, including pictured Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Budget Committee Chairman Diane Black, R-Tenn., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, R-Ore., held a news conference Tuesday as the group continues to pitch a repeal and replace plan in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By RANDY LEONARD and ERIN MERSHON CQ Roll Call

A GOP proposal to repeal and replace portions of the 2010 health care law is making its way though the House, but it faces an uncertain fate.

CBO: Lower Deficit, More Uninsured Under House Health Plan
Nonpartisan budget scorekeepers predict savings, uninsured would grow

Speaker Paul Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy have been pushing their health plan hard. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 8:37 p.m. | The House Republican leadership’s legislation to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law would reduce the deficit by $337 billion over a decade while increasing the number of uninsured by 24 million people by 2026, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Monday.

The nonpartisan budget scorekeepers predicted that under the House GOP plan — which was scheduled for consideration by the House Budget Committee on Thursday to be packaged as a reconciliation bill that would only require a majority to pass in the Senate —  the biggest savings would come as a result of decreased funding to Medicaid and cutting off subsidies for individuals to purchase insurance on the health care exchanges. It would also lower average premiums enough to stabilize the individual health insurance market, according to the “score” of the legislation.