Delaware

From Legislation to Attraction, The Wharf Officially Opens
Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton helps open mile-long stretch along the Southwest D.C. Waterfront

From left, Monty Hoffman, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and Ward 6 Councilmember Charles Allen appear during the opening ceremony of the Wharf complex along Maine Avenue on Thursday. Hoffman is a member of the development team. (Tom Williams/Roll Call)

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton saw her bill turn into the grand opening of The Wharf, a sprawling and vibrant mile-long strip along D.C.’s Southwest Waterfront.

“With the opening of this site, D.C. is becoming a true waterfront community,” she said Thursday at the opening ceremony, attended by hundreds of Washingtonians, including Mayor Muriel Bowser, Ward 6 Councilmember Charles Allen and The Wharf’s managing director, Monty Hoffman.

Word on the Hill: Welcome, Wharf
Sensenbrenner’s town halls, Boyle on soccer, and Hatch is Cosmo

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton will help open up the newly renovated area in Southwest D.C. (Chris Maddaloni/Roll Call File Photo)

$2.5 billion later, the mile-long stretch on the Southwest D.C. waterfront — The Wharf — will officially open today. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., and Mayor Muriel Bowser will participate in the opening ceremony at 11 a.m.

That’s followed by a day of live music, including a Bacon Brothers concert at 5 p.m., muralists, magicians, face painters, stilt walkers and daytime fireworks. Watch for HOH’s coverage of the opening.

EPA Moves to Repeal Climate Rule; Lawsuits to Follow
With Clean Power Plan on the chopping block, environmental groups gear up to sue

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, left, said this week that unraveling the Clean Power Plan would right “the wrongs of the Obama administration.” (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

The EPA’s move on Tuesday to undo the Obama administration’s signature climate change rule will almost certainly trigger an onslaught of lawsuits from environmental groups and many blue states that have been bracing for that action since President Donald Trump took office.

The agency said it had filed a notice with the Federal Register proposing to unravel the 2015 Clean Power Plan and will seek public input into that proposal over a 60-day period. But the EPA did not commit to promulgating a replacement policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which environmentalists have said would lead them to sue to stop the repeal or force the agency to write a new policy.

Word on the Hill: Senate Recess Week
Your social calendar for the week

Florida Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen leaves the Capitol after the last votes last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Welcome back from the long weekend. The Senate is in recess this week, and next week, the House will be in recess.

Today is World Mental Health Day to raise awareness of mental health issues around the globe, according to the World Health Organization.

Word on the Hill: Making D.C. History
Breakfast honoring service dog advocates, and #280Characters

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, right, shown here with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, will receive an award from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What do Jose Andres and Eleanor Holmes Norton have in common? The nation’s capital.

The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., is presenting its Making D.C. History Awards tonight to them and other Washingtonians who have positively influenced the city.

Word on the Hill: Gifts for McCain
Partnership for Public Service awards, and staffer shuffle

A banner for Sen. John McCain flew over the University of Phoenix stadium. (Courtesy UltraViolet)

You would think it was Sen. John McCain’s birthday again. Since the Arizona Republican announced his opposition to the Graham-Cassidy health care bill, liberal groups have given him a cake, sent him cupcakes and flown a banner over the site of an NFL game.

UltraViolet delivered a cake to McCain’s Phoenix office Tuesday, and the women’s advocacy group also delivered one to the Portland office of Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine. The group chartered a plane to fly over the University of Phoenix Stadium before Monday’s Cardinals vs. Cowboys NFL game, thanking McCain for his opposition to the bill. Tailgaters and those preparing for the game were able to spot it, including reporter Ryan Haarer.

GOP Civil War Heads South for Alabama Senate Race
Sen. Luther Strange and former Judge Roy Moore face off Tuesday

Sen. Luther Strange is running in the GOP runoff in Alabama’s Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

All eyes are on Alabama as voters head to the polls in a race that has thrown Republican Party divisions into the spotlight.

Sen. Luther Strange faces former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore in Tuesday’s special election primary runoff. Strange was appointed to the seat by disgraced Gov. Robert Bentley after former Sen. Jeff Sessions resigned to become attorney general. 

Word on the Hill: Busy Week
Your social calendar for the week

Events all over D.C. to explore this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy Monday and welcome back.

This week is packed with things to do around the D.C. area.

Word on the Hill: International Day of Peace
Historical Society event tickets on sale

Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. and Meridian Witt, an 8th grader from Capitol Hill Cluster School, prepare to ring the World Harmony Bell on the Capitol Lawn, a day before the 2007 International Day of Peace. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Today is the International Day of Peace, a day established by the United Nations as an annual commemoration of world peace.

To mark the occasion, the United States Institute of Peace is encouraging people to take the Peace Day Challenge. Some ways make the world around you more peaceful? A promotional video from the institute suggests talking to someone who doesn’t look like you, volunteering for a cause you care about or speaking up when you see someone being intolerant. Post on social media how you observed the day, using the hashtag #PeaceDayChallenge.

Republican Senators Mostly Silent After Trump’s North Korea Threat
President would hit regime, military targets - not civilians, White House says

Republican Sens. Bob Corker (center), Marco Rubio (seated right) and Jim Risch (standing right) all declined to comment on GOP President Donald Trump's threat to "totally destroy" North Korea if it attacks the United States. Also pictured are GOP Sens. Cory Gardner (standing left) and Ron Johnson (seated left). (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker hurried into an elevator. Sen. Marco Rubio quickly ducked into the Capitol Visitor Center television studio. And Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain shut down reporters’ repetitive questions.

No Republican senator could be found Tuesday who was willing to question President Donald Trump’s threat before the United Nations General Assembly to “totally destroy” North Korea unless it gives up its nuclear arms and long-range missile programs, which he views as a direct threat to the sovereignty and security of the United States and its allies.