Delaware

Numerous Inauguration Protests: From Nonviolent Chants to Bricks-in-Windows
Inauguration Day protests throughout D.C. take different tones

A shattered window of a Starbucks shop in downtown D.C. on Friday. (Matt Rhodes for CQ Roll Call)

On Inaugural Day in Washington, some twenty-something, left-leaning protesters dressed in black threw bricks into the windows of local storefronts. Elsewhere, sixty-something antiwar activists held up colorful signs and coordinated peaceful chants.

And while police used pepper-spray to break up some demonstrators in downtown D.C., on another street a man wearing a cherry-red Make America Great Again baseball cap calmly chatted in the middle of 7th Street NW with a young man wearing a dark hood that enveloped his face.

Highlights of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

President Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was full of both Trump bombast and the ceremonial pomp and circumstance that comes with the swearing in of a new commander in chief.

On one end, many worked to uphold the democratic traditions while Trump sought to drive home the points of his inauguration.

Word on the Hill: The Day Before
Details about getting around D.C.

Workers put the finishing touches on the platform at the Capitol on Tuesday for Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tomorrow is Donald Trump’s big day and the bulk of state society parties take place tonight.

Check out our list of this evening’s balls and galas and tips for making the most of the next couple of days.

Sessions Will Follow the Law, But He Won’t Lead on It
Job requires someone who is aware of oppression and discrimination

Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions’s answers on the first day of his attorney general confirmation hearing on Tuesday were “deeply unsatisfying and basically meaningless,” Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It sounds so good that Jeff Sessions said it over and over again when Democratic senators pressed him on how he would approach the job of attorney general: I will follow the law.

It’s what he said when Illinois Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin asked what he would do with “Dreamers,” undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children. Ditto when Sen. Dianne Feinstein asked him about gay rights and abortion rights. 

Biden to Take Amtrak Home After Inauguration
‘Jill and I will head home to Delaware the same way I have for 44 years’

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. speaks at an event to announce funding for Amtrak as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act at Union Station in Washington in March 2009. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will be leaving Washington the same way he entered it: by Amtrak. 

In a tweet sent Tuesday, the outgoing vice president wrote, “Jill and I will head home to Delaware the same way I have for 44 years: by train.”

Photos of the Week: Biden Schmoozes Through Last Swearing-In, Pence and Obama on the Hill
The week of Jan. 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. greets Barbara Grassley, wife of Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley, during the swearing-in ceremony in the Capitol’s Old Senate Chamber on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK AND TOM WILLIAMS

The 115th Congress has officially convened and members have been sworn in. While Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is officially on his way out, he didn’t go quietly. His last Senate swearing in was filled with hugs, stories, selfies, and, yes, kisses.

Norton Tries to Shame Republicans Into Dropping Efforts to Overturn D.C. Gun Laws
D.C. delegate points to signs outside Capitol Hill buildings announcing guns are prohibited

New signs outside Capitol complex buildings warn of prohibited items. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Schumer Seeks Inquiry Into HHS Nominee’s Health Stock Trades
Asks whether Price’s position in the House aided him in his trades.

Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon, Patty Murray of Washington and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York hold a news conference to discuss the nomination of Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., to be secretary of the Health and Human Services Department, in the U.S. Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer on Thursday called for an investigation into the trading of medical industry stocks by President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Department of Health and Human Services. The Trump transition team responded by highlighting recent trading in pharmaceutical stocks by three Democratic senators.

Schumer, a New York Democrat, asked that the House Office of Congressional Ethics look into Price’s trading in health care stocks, an issue that Roll Call investigated in a story last month. Price last year traded shares of firms such as Gilead Sciences, Aetna and CVS Health Corp, while serving on the Ways and Means Health Subcommittee.

Hail to the Chiefs
Incoming members look to different corners for chiefs of staff

Minh Ta, former chief of staff to Wisconsin Rep. Gwen Moore, is moving over to freshman Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester‘s office to serve as her chief. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With President-elect Donald Trump rounding out his Cabinet, new members of Congress have been going through a similar — although more predictable — process of filling out their congressional offices. 

The first and most important hires are almost always the chiefs of staff, who come from all walks of political life. Most commonly, new members tap their campaign managers or the chiefs of departing members. They also often retain members of their kitchen cabinets, or close personal advisers, as their chiefs. 

How to Watch the Quirky Congressional Opening Day
Look for unusual traditions, cacophony and a few moments of bipartisanship

Congressional opening day collegiality may devolve into partisan posturing almost as soon as the swearing-in Bibles are shelved. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If the last fall’s orientation period for the newest lawmakers was the Capitol Hill equivalent of freshman days at college, then the formal convening of the 115th Congress on Tuesday is the first day of school.  

And so it may be useful, for the congressional community as well as the throngs of well-wishers in town just for the festivities, to be reminded of some of the curious ways in which the customs of the day are different from all the others.