Defense

Analysis: At Trump Rally, It Was 2016 Again
President mixes fear with bold promises, big boasts before friendly crowd

President Donald Trump speaks during the annual Days of Remembrance Holocaust ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda on April 25, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, echoing his populist 2016 campaign, mixed the politics of fear and bold promises as he returned to the campaign trail Tuesday evening in Ohio.

As he delivered parts of his remarks in Youngstown, it well could have been July 2016 with then-Republican nominee Trump at the podium. The world is more unsafe than ever. The United States has been run for too long by “stupid” politicians. People who wish to Americans harm are pouring over the southern border. Other countries are taking advantage of U.S. workers and consumers.

Conservative Groups Come to Sessions’ Defense
Law enforcement groups and officials praise embattled attorney general

Attorney General Jeff Sessions received support from outside conservative organizations amid reports of his job being in jeopardy (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservative groups are rushing to Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ defense after repeated criticism from President Donald Trump and reports that his days are numbered.

Jonathan Thompson, CEO and executive director for the National Sheriffs’ Association, praised Sessions for his support of law enforcement.

House GOP Push to Reverse Course on Spending Strategy Fails

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., don’t appear to have the votes to pursue a 12-bill omnibus spending package. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House GOP appropriators’ and other rank-and-file members’ last-minute push to vote on a full 12-bill spending package before the August recess has failed to garner enough support for leadership to reverse course.

The now twice-made decision to proceed with a four-bill minibus package of national security-related appropriations bills instead of a 12-bill omnibus is a blow to those in the Republican Conference who saw pursuing a 12-bill strategy a win.

McCain Returns, Will Likely Lead Defense Policy Debate

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., returns to the Capitol and will be involved in the defense authorization debate. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., recently diagnosed with brain cancer, made the surprise announcement Monday he would return to the Capitol for a procedural vote today on health care legislation, as well as anticipated debate on the chamber’s Pentagon policy bill and sanctions legislation.

Over in the House, lawmakers are preparing to take up a so-called security minibus, which includes the Defense appropriations bill. And that chamber is expected to take up a Russia, Iran and North Korea sanctions bills today.

Now McCain Is a ‘Hero’ to Trump
President praises Arizona Republican’s return to Washington

Arizona Sen. John McCain returns to the Hill on Tuesday to vote on a motion to proceed on the Republican health care legislation. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Washington is showering its praises on Sen. John McCain for returning to the Capitol onTuesday to vote on the Senate’s motion to proceed on the bill to dismantle the 2010 health care law, a week after he was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an often fatal form of brain cancer.

Leading the charge on Tuesday morning was President Donald Trump, who once belittled the Arizona Republican for being shot down and captured during the Vietnam War.

McCain to Return to Senate for Key Health Care Vote
Pentagon policy bill debate also awaits Arizona Republican

Sen. John McCain with a friend identified as Joe Harper in Oak Creek, Arizona. (Courtesy McCain’s Twitter page)

By JOE WILLIAMS and JOHN M. DONNELLYUpdated 10:10 p.m. | Sen. John McCain will return to the Senate chamber Tuesday in time for a key procedural vote on the Republican legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, his office confirmed Monday evening.

The Arizona Republican announced last week he was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an often fatal form of brain cancer.

How Bad Political Manners Fomented the Health Care Mess
Lawmakers feel free to misbehave when their leaders drop ‘regular order’

Republicans in Congress may be emulating President Donald Trump’s political manners. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A president whose brand is all about flouting basic political manners is getting matched in misbehavior more and more by fellow Republicans in Congress.

The first six months under President Donald Trump have been marked not only by a further coarsening of GOP rhetoric, stoked mainly by incessant infighting in backrooms, but also by increasing defiance of decades of behavioral norms — from Trump’s nominal friends and skeptics alike, when they’ve been trying to work with him and when they’ve been scrambling to maneuver despite him.

Analysis: Senators Writing Placeholder Defense Money Bill
Figure will be lower than House, in prelude to likely deal

Senate Appropriations Chairman Thad Cochran predicts Congress and the administration will eventually make a deal on raising the budget caps on defense accounts. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate appropriators’ forthcoming Pentagon spending bill for fiscal 2018, which will contain tens of billions of dollars less than the House’s measure, should be taken seriously, but not literally.

The Senate spending panel’s defense funding proposal is likely to grow, assuming — as is likely — that an agreement to slightly raise the budget caps is reached, as it has been for every year since the caps called for by the sequester were enacted in 2011.

Perdue’s Fellows Connect Congress to the Corps
Maj. Simba Chigwida is a national defense fellow this year

Georgia Sen. David Perdue poses with Maj. Jim Purekal, left, and Maj. Simba Chigwida in front of the Marine Corps War Memorial. (Courtesy Perdue’s office)

Georgia Sen. David Perdue’s office has had the unique opportunity of having two active-duty Marine Corps officers working there.

The Marine Corps affords some Marines the opportunity to apply for congressional fellowship positions and, if accepted, assigns them to a House or Senate office. Of the roughly 100 Marine fellows currently on the Hill, Perdue’s office has been assigned two back-to-back, which is pretty rare.

Fred Upton Might Join Bipartisan Climate Caucus

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., might join a bipartisan climate change caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A House caucus that supports legislation to combat climate change may be joined by key Republican energy influencer who would raise its credibility among GOP lawmakers.

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., the former Energy and Commerce chairman who leads the committee's energy panel, is considering joining the bipartisan 48-member Climate Solutions Caucus, a group equally divided between Democrats and Republicans.