DCCC

Lawmakers Predict GOP Bill Will Be 2018 Campaign Issue
Republicans may still be tethered to a bill that was never put to a vote

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference where Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced the vote for leadership’s health care plan had been canceled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans won’t have a recorded vote on leadership’s health care plan but that doesn’t mean their position on it won’t be used against them in campaign ads in 2018. 

Former National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Greg Walden, now chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, admitted as much Friday evening. “Everybody staked out their position so they’ll be able to reap the benefit of that position or take the hit,” he told Roll Call.

Trump to Traipse to Capitol for Tuesday GOP Conference
Visit comes ahead of Thursday vote on GOP Health Plan

President Donald Trump will return to the Capitol on Tuesday to sell the GOP health plan to Republicans. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump will speak to House Republicans Tuesday morning at their weekly conference meeting about the health care bill the chamber is scheduled to vote on Thursday, according to a House Republican aide.

The president’s trip to the Capitol comes as several House Republicans, particularly conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus and some moderates in the Tuesday Group, remain uneasy about GOP leadership’s legislation to repeal and partially replace the 2010 health care law.

Rising Waters at Home Cause Republicans to Buck Party in D.C.
Moderate Republicans are out front on climate change threat

New York Rep. John J. Faso is one of several GOP freshmen concerned about climate change. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Whipping out his iPhone, New York Rep. John J. Faso scrolled through text messages from his wife until he found the photo he sought. 

“There’s my wife’s car in the driveway,” he said, pointing to a lump covered in snow. “So there was no climate change that we were worried about in the last couple of days.”

Yesterday’s US Attorneys May Be Tomorrow’s Congressional Candidates
Abrupt ouster by Trump administration provides incentive

Dana Boente could be a plausible challenger to Republican Scott Taylor in Virginia’s 2nd District. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump’s abrupt ouster of almost half the country’s U.S. attorneys has done more than create yet another tempest for his nascent administration. It’s also created a new and potentially potent Democratic political class.

Campaign consultants in both parties have long identified prosecutors — especially those confirmed by the Senate to act as the chief federal law enforcement officers in the nation’s 93 judicial districts — as top-flight congressional recruiting opportunities. But, for reasons that aren’t all that obvious, the Republicans have propelled many more crime busters onto Capitol Hill than the Democrats in recent years.

Texas Isn’t Only State Where Redistricting Could Be Factor in 2018
Redistricting cases are still pending in North Carolina and Maryland

The lines of Texas Rep. Will Hurd’s district could be redrawn as a result of last week’s court decision that ruled it was racially gerrymandered. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With a three-judge panel invalidating the lines of one of the most competitive congressional districts in the country late last week, redistricting is once again in the political spotlight.

The Texas case was a reminder that redistricting litigation, which played out in the lead-up to the 2016 elections, is still ongoing across the country. It could result in Rep. Will Hurd’s district becoming more favorable for Democrats in 2018, 

The Not-So-Special Elections
Of 5 upcoming contests, only Georgia race presents chance of a partisan flip

Karen Handel is hoping to succeed Tom Price in Georgia’s 6th District, but first, she faces an April 18 jungle primary with 17 other candidates. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Money is pouring into the suburbs north of Atlanta, the site of the first competitive congressional election of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Georgia’s 6th District, left vacant by the confirmation of Tom Price as Health and Human Services Secretary, is one of five special elections taking place across the country this spring, but the only one which offers much of a chance of a partisan flip.

Second Democrat Jumps into Issa Race
Major Democratic donor Mike Levin announces run

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., has another Democratic challenger for 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A second Democrat is jumping into the race to challenge Republican Rep. Darrell Issa in California.

Mike Levin, an environmental lawyer based in San Juan Capistrano, announced his candidacy Wednesday.

A Conversation With Democratic Strategist Kelly Ward
Ex-DCCC executive director looks back on 2016 election

Nathan L. Gonzales, elections analyst at Roll Call and publisher of Inside Elections, sits down with former DCCC executive director Kelly Ward. (Screenshot)

While the race for the 2018 midterms has effectively kicked off (Inside Elections and Roll Call have released initial race ratings for both the House and Senate), some of us are also still analyzing the 2016 election results.

I recently sat down with Kelly Ward, the former executive director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, to get her take on how November went for the party and specifically for House Democrats. In December, she announced she was leaving the group for a new Democratic redistricting effort. 

Former DCCC Exec Says “Signs” Were There for Trump

Democrats Identify Vulnerable Members for 2018
DCCC names 19 incumbents to Frontline Program

New Hampshire Rep. Ann McLane Kuster, chairwoman of the DCCC’s Frontline Program, is herself a Frontline member heading into 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee on Monday is naming 19 members to the Frontline Program for its most vulnerable incumbents in 2018.

The initial Frontline roster, obtained first by Roll Call, is about half freshman members. Eight members won in districts President Donald Trump carried last fall. And all of them, save for one, are National Republican Congressional Committee initial targets.