David Perdue

Karen Handel Proves Third Time’s the Charm
Georgia Republican heads to Congress after 2 losing bids for higher office

Karen Handel gives her victory speech to supporters in Atlanta on Tuesday, as her husband Steve Handel looks on. (Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)

Republican Karen Handel comes to Congress after a 28-year career with a diverse portfolio of public- and private-sector jobs ranging from overseeing elections as Georgia’s secretary of state to heading the Fulton County Board of Commissioners to serving as the vice president of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, which supports breast cancer research.

Handel defeated Democrat Jon Ossoff 52 percent to 48 percent in Tuesday’s 6th District special election runoff to replace former Rep. Tom Price, who vacated the seat to become secretary of Health and Human Services.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Artwork Wrapped
Former congresswoman joins NYU, and conservative senators get ranked

Paintings have been wrapped on the Senate side of the Capitol during testing of a new smoke control system. (Niels Lesniewski/CQ Roll Call)

You may have noticed that some paintings and busts around the Capitol are covered in a plastic wrapping.

The artwork located in the corridors and grand stairwells of the Capitol are all covered for their protection during the testing of the new smoke control system

Tenney’s Son Received a Surprise Call From Trump Before Deployment
Sen. David Perdue tipped off the president about deployment of lawmaker's son

Rep. Claudia Tenney’s son left for Iraq on Saturday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York GOP freshman Rep. Claudia Tenney’s son received a phone call from President Donald Trump before he deployed to Iraq on Saturday.

Before Marine Corps 1st Lt. Trey Cleary left for a six-month deployment, he was surprised to hear Trump’s voice on the other end of a Friday phone call, Syracuse.com reported.

Georgia Runoff Will Test Both Parties’ Political Alliances
Parties gearing up for expensive fight in Georgia's 6th District

Karen Handel, seen her in 2014, is uniting the GOP behind her after finishing second in Tuesday’s 18-candidate primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

ALPHARETTA, Ga. — For a brief moment, Georgia’s 6th District was quiet.

Out-of-state journalists who flooded this suburban battleground headed for the airport Wednesday morning. After a very late Tuesday night, Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel held no public events in the district the next day. Instead, they gave interviews on cable TV — a reflection of how nationalized this race has become. 

Among 18 Georgia Candidates, One Competitive Woman
Karen Handel could take possible runoff slot in special election

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel has lost her last two bids for higher office, but now could be poised to finish in the top two Tuesday night and advance to a runoff for the open 6th District seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ROSWELL, Ga. — No campaign push in Georgia’s 6th District is complete without a stop at Rhea’s, an old-fashioned burger joint.

“If you want to win, you gotta have Jimmy’s help,” said Republican candidate Karen Handel, nodding to the owner who was flipping burgers behind the counter at the Roswell location Monday afternoon. 

All Eyes on Turnout in Georgia Special Election
Jon Ossoff thinks outright victory on Tuesday is ‘within reach’

Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff speaks to campaign volunteers Monday before they head out to canvass the 6th District, one day before the special election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ROSWELL, Ga. — Morning rain showers with scattered afternoon thunderstorms. That’s the forecast for Election Day in the House district that’s set for one of the most closely watched special elections ever. 

In the final hours of the race to fill Georgia’s 6th District seat, only one thing mattered to the leading candidates: turnout. 

On Paper, Trump’s First 50 Days Resemble Previous Presidents’
But turbulence, including Obama claims, defined opening seven weeks

President Donald Trump arrives at the White House on Feb. 6 after spending the weekend in Florida. In many ways, his first 50 days match those of other recent presidents. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

On one hand, the first 50 days of Donald Trump’s presidency, in some ways, closely resemble those of his recent predecessors. But on the other, those similarities largely have been overshadowed by missteps and inflammatory tweets. 

A botched executive order temporarily banning many Muslims from entering the United States, allegations that former President Barack Obama tapped his phones, and an otherwise chaotic seven weeks have defined Trump’s first 50 days. But data reviewed by CQ Roll Call stretching back to the opening days of the Reagan administration shows Trump is off to a start much like several other recent commanders in chief.50Days-top-summary

GOP Members on Trump: Health Care Measure is 'His Bill'
Trump will put 'presidential weight behind this legislation,' key chairman says

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (far right) trails President Donald Trump into the House chamber last Tuesday night before the president’s first address to a joint session of Congress. A week later, Scalise and his deputy whips made clear Trump also owns a health care overhaul bill they released this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A parade of lawmakers huddled privately with Donald Trump on Tuesday, with several senior House Republicans ending the procession by stating that the president owns their bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

In all, 25 House members and senators streamed through the executive mansion on a day when the Trump White House was eager to portray a unified Republican Party getting down to the details of the president’s policy agenda. Those who spoke after their meetings with Trump described the meetings, which lasted from lunchtime to late afternoon, as “great” and “very productive.”

Cabinet-Level Nominees Play the Waiting Game
Politics, paperwork and holdings slowing things down

Four Cabinet-level nominees remain to be confirmed. Clockwise from top left, Dan Coats for director of national intelligence, Alexander Acosta for secretary of Labor, Robert Lighthizer for U.S. trade representative and Sonny Perdue for secretary of Agriculture. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call, Alan Diaz/AP, Chambersandpartners.com, Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Farm groups thought they’d have a new Agriculture secretary by now after a long wait to find out who would be the nominee. But they’re growing anxious again over the delayed confirmation of former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue. 

President Donald Trump has accused Democrats of keeping him from filling his Cabinet, but Perdue’s nomination appears to be on hold because the Senate Agriculture Committee has yet to receive his paperwork.

Why Was David Perdue at Trump’s Table?
First-term GOP senator shares president’s business background

Georgia Republican Sen. David Perdue was one of the earliest and most vocal advocates for President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

BY NIELS LESNIEWSKI AND JOHN T. BENNETT, CQ ROLL CALL

Looking around the lunch table with President Donald Trump and Republican congressional leaders Wednesday, there was one face you might not have expected to see at the table.