David Jolly

Patrick Murphy Talkin’ ’Bout His Generation
Former congressman to begin Georgetown fellowship this fall

Former Florida Rep. Patrick Murphy, shown here in 2016, was 29 when he was first elected to the House in 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One of the first millennials elected to Congress will head to Georgetown University this fall to help students understand political issues unique to their generation. 

As a fellow with the Institute of Politics and Public Service at Georgetown’s McCourt School of Public Policy, Former Rep. Patrick Murphy, 34, will lead discussions on how government must adjust to accommodate the so-called “gig” economy, how political careers have changed in the age of social media, and how an anticipated flood of millennial voters could upend norms in Washington, among other issues. 

Jolly Sets up Nonprofit for Florida Issues
Says he won’t consider running for Congress again in ‘this calendar year’

Former Rep. David Jolly, R-Fla., said Brighter Future Florida Inc. will use unspent campaign cash to promote issues he supports. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. David Jolly announced Thursday he’s launching a nonprofit organization to promote policies he supports, which will help him maintain a public profile as he contemplates his political future.

Jolly told the Tampa Bay Times that Brighter Future Florida Inc. will use his unspent campaign cash to promote veterans' affairs, education, community health care solutions, education and literacy and issues that affect fisheries and the environment.

Charlie Crist Files for Divorce
Freshman congressman’s wife served as his campaign director

Rep. Charlie Crist, D-Fla., was married for nine years. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Freshman Democratic Rep. Charlie Crist of Florida is filing for divorce from his wife of nine years.

“It just didn’t work out for us,” Crist told the Tampa Bay Times.

David Jolly Hires Charlie Crist Staffer for 2018
Jolly has not decided whether to run for office again

Former GOP Rep. David Jolly has hired the district director of the man who defeated him, Democratic Rep. Charlie Crist, to advise him for the 2018 political cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Former Rep. David Jolly, ousted by Democrat Charlie Crist just two and half months ago, hasn’t yet decided to run for office again. But in a sign that the Florida Republican may be gearing up for a rematch in the 13th District, Jolly has hired a Crist staffer as a senior adviser for the 2018 cycle. 

Vito Sheeley worked as campaign outreach director for Crist’s congressional campaign and district director for the congressman for the 115th Congress, which has only been in session for about three weeks. 

Gubernatorial Losers Descend on Next Congress
Up to six new House Members previously lost a race for governor

Rep.-elect Anthony Brown, who lost a governor’s race in Maryland two years ago, walks down the House steps for the 115th Congress freshman class group photo during the first week of orientation on Nov. 15. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Getting to know your new classmates is always an awkward experience, but a handful of new House members will have at least one thing in common: losing a race for governor.

Two years ago, Democrat Anthony Brown lost the Maryland gubernatorial race to Republican Larry Hogan in an upset, 51 percent to 47 percent. But the former lieutenant governor rebounded to win a competitive Democratic primary this year in Maryland’s 4th District when Rep. Donna Edwards decided to run for the Senate. Brown cruised in the general election and will be coming to Congress next year.

Did Down-Ballot Democrats Rely Too Heavily on Trump?
Party only cut historic House deficit by 6 seats

Democrats were unsuccessful in their attempts to tie Minnesota Rep. Erik Paulsen to Donald Trump. The congressman ended up coasting to re-election by 14 points. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats never thought they were in for a great night on Tuesday, but their scant gains are inspiring new questions about how the party wins congressional elections after several cycles of disappointment.

Front and center, of course, is Donald Trump. How they missed the signs of Trump’s surprise victory will be a bigger question for the entire Democratic Party (and Republicans and the media alike) for months to come. 

Vulnerable House Republicans Hold On
Democrats have gained a net of at least six seats

Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., won re-election, signaling that down-ballot Republicans in competitive districts may be able to overcome Democratic efforts to tie them to Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:00 a.m.

With Donald Trump winning the White House, Republicans continue to hold a comfortable House majority. 

New Member: Democrat Charlie Crist Elected in Florida’s 13th District
Defeats GOP Rep. Jolly in district that became more Democratic after redistricting

Democrat Charlie Crist is heading to Congress after unseating GOP Rep. David Jolly. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, now a Democrat, will defeat Republican Rep. David Jolly in Florida’s 13th District, The Associated Press projects.

Crist led Jolly 52 percent to 48 percent with nearly 99 percent of precincts reporting.

How the Hill's Endangered Have Been Voting
Some Republicans in Democratic turf have moderated, others have stayed hard right

Maine Rep. Bruce Poliquin, center, has a lower-than-average party unity score while New Hampshire Rep. Frank C. Guinta, right, who is even more vulnerable, scores close to the party average. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The year’s desultory legislative track record offers this insight into the closing days of the campaign for Congress: The already compacted political middle is threatened with additional shrinkage.

In the Senate, especially, but also in the House, the collection of lawmakers running scared less than a week before Election Day is overstocked with an endangered ideological species — the independent-minded centrist.

Word on the Hill: #HOHhalloween
Spooky legends from the halls of the Capitol

In 2001, Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel dressed up as Arizona Sen. John McCain for Halloween. (Tom Williams/ CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy #HOHhalloween

With only eight days to go before Election Day, how are you dressing up this Halloween? As Hillary? Bill? Donald? Barack? Ken Bone?