Dan Sullivan

Opinion: Congress’ Passive Response to North Korea: ‘Not My Table’
Lawmakers need to step up

When dealing with President Donald Trump — especially when problems with North Korea are looming — members of Congress should remember that they are part of a co-equal branch of government, Shapiro writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Just as he did back during Black History Month in February with his startling discovery that Frederick Douglass “is being recognized more and more,” Donald Trump demonstrated in Monday’s White House statement on Charlottesville, Virginia, that he can learn and grow in office.

In 48 short hours, Trump discovered that “racism is evil” and groups like “the KKK, neo-Nazis [and] white supremacists … are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

Trump: Military ‘Locked and Loaded’ for North Korea
President escalates threats against Kim Jong-un

President Donald Trump speaks during a security briefing on Thursday at his Bedminster National Golf Club in New Jersey. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump escalated the war of words between the U.S. and North Korea early Friday, tweeting that the military was “locked and loaded” should Pyongyang make good on its threats to strike U.S. targets.

“Military solutions are now fully in place, locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely,” the president tweeted. “Hopefully [North Korean leader] Kim Jong Un will find another path!”

Murkowski and Zinke Mend Fences Over Beers
Comes after reports that Interior secretary threatened Alaska senator over health care vote

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke takes a selfie with Alaska Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski sharing a Alaskan craft beer. (Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke via Twitter)

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski met to mend fences over beers to settle their feud over the senator’s vote on the Republican health care bill.

Zinke tweeted a photo of himself and the Alaska Republican holding what appears to be a local pale ale.

Collins, Murkowski Set the Stage for McCain’s Dramatic Vote
Female senators came under withering criticism, threats in run-up to health care vote

Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, second from left, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska flank President Donald Trump as he meets with Senate Republicans on the GOP health care bill in June. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine withstood withering criticism — including a rhetorical challenge to a duel and a threat from the White House — to set the stage for the dramatic last-minute health care vote early Friday morning. 

In the end, though, it was Arizona Sen. John McCain — returning to Washington during treatment for brain cancer diagnosis — who got the spotlight.

Now McCain is Schumer’s Hero
Senate Minority Leader said McCain told him about his vote in the afternoon

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., left, praised Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., for his vote against the Republican plans to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When it was announced Sen. John McCain was diagnosed with brain cancer, members of both parties hailed him as “an American hero.”

When he returned to Washington, presumably to cast the deciding vote on the Republican health care bill, President Donald Trump, who once famously disputed McCain’s heroism, called him “Brave – American hero!”

Murkowski Pushes Back on Trump
Comes after Murkowski and Sullivan faced threats

An Alaska news outlet reported that Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, above, and Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, received a threatening phone call from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke due to Murkowski's vote against the Republican health care bill.(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski pushed back against President Donald Trump amid reports that his administration supposedly threatened retribution for her opposition to the health care bill.

Murkowski's words come as her vote against repealing the 2010 health care law led to her and fellow Alaska Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan both received a call from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke saying that the vote could harm the state’s future, Alaska Dispatch News reported.

GOP Senators Take Sessions’ Side in Spat With Trump
Former colleagues provide cover to beleaguered attorney general

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is under fire from President Donald Trump, but his former colleagues in the Senate have nothing but nice things to say about him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Confronted with the rare and awkward choice of siding with either a president of their party or a Cabinet member who’s a former colleague, Senate Republicans are sounding of single mind:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, until five months ago a senior GOP senator from Alabama, has done nothing to merit the upbraiding he’s been taking from President Donald Trump.

Podcast: How the GOP Is Shopping for Health Bill Votes
The Week Ahead, Episode 62

Protesters march around the Capitol to voice their opposition to the GOP health care legislation on Wednesday, June 28, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republican lawmakers, by keeping two Obamacare taxes on the wealthy, hope to mute Democratic arguments that their health care plan would take away benefits from the poor to help the rich, say CQ Roll Call health reporter Kerry Young and tax reporter Alan K. Ota. But that doesn't mean that the wealthy won't get their tax cuts in legislation yet to come. 

 

Medicaid Still Key Sticking Point in GOP Health Debate
Additional changes impacting the entitlement program are under consideration

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, is one of several GOP members who have not yet publicized their position on the revised bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Just hours after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellunveiled an updated bill to overhaul the U.S. insurance system, lawmakers hesitant about the proposed changes to Medicaid huddled in the Kentucky Republican’s office in search of a solution.

The members, which included Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, John Hoeven of North Dakota, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Rob Portman of Ohio, were also joined by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma.

Podcast: Short Recess, Long on Goals
The Big Story, Episode 62

The Senate will stick around Washington a little longer in August, shortening its recess to focus on an ambitious agenda. The list of things to do could include confirming the new FBI director. CQ Roll Call Senior Senate Reporter Niels Lesniewski and Leadership Editor Jason Dick break down what is doable.