Dan Newhouse

Photos of the Week: A Historic Hearing and Vote as Nation Watches Hill
The week of Sept. 24 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

A group of women are arrested after sitting-in on First Street outside of the Supreme Court as  nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

A very long and powerful week has nearly come to a close in Washington. Senators reached a deal Friday to delay a floor vote on the Supreme Court nomination to allow for a one-week FBI investigation into allegations of sexual assault by the nominee.

Earlier in the week, the Supreme Court pick’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, testified in the Senate, followed by testimony from Brett Kavanaugh. 

McMorris Rodgers Narrowly Secures Top Spot in Washington Primary
Democrat Lisa Brown was close behind in second place

Washington GOP Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers is a Democratic target. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers narrowly secured the top spot in her primary in Washington on Tuesday, which could embolden Democrats looking to unseat the only woman in GOP leadership.

Under Washington’s top-two primary system, all candidates run on the same ballot and the two with the most votes, regardless of party, advance to November. 

Washington Could Be Key Battleground for Women in Both Parties
Female Democrats could emerge as challengers in all four GOP-held House seats

House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers is a Democratic target this year in Washington’s 5th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With a surge of female House candidates across the country, Washington is emerging as a key battleground for women on both sides of the aisle. 

All four of the state’s Republican-held districts could have female Democratic challengers following next week’s primary. And two of those Republican targets are women. 

Lawmakers Renew Efforts to Pass Family Separation Bill
But with House already out for recess, no legislative solution possible until September

A girl participates in a rally at Freedom Plaza in downtown Washington on June 27 to to protest the Trump administration policy that separated migrant children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers say they are renewing efforts to find what has been elusive legislation to keep families together at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the Trump administration announced it would meet the latest court deadline for reuniting more than 1,400 children it had separated from their immigrant parents.

Department of Homeland Security officials said they expected to complete all “eligible” reunifications by midnight Thursday, Pacific time. Beyond those, 711 children remain in custody because they’re not “eligible” for reunification, according to the department. Of those, 431 have a parent who was deported from the U.S. without them, officials said.

Trump’s Immigration Enforcement Agenda Gets Boost from Partisan Vote
Bill would provide $51.4 billion to Homeland Security

Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally during his visit to see the border wall prototypes on March 13, 2018 in San Diego, California. The administration’s immigration enforcement agenda got a significant boost from a House Appropriations Committee vote this week. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump’s immigration enforcement and border security agenda got a significant boost after the  House Appropriations Committee voted 29-22 along party lines to approve a bill that would provide $51.4 billion to the Homeland Security Department in fiscal 2019. 

Overall, Wednesday’s  bill — which  would provide $51.4 billion in discretionary funding to DHS, a nearly 8 percent increase over the $47.7 billion provided to the department in the fiscal 2018 omnibus spending law. 

House Immigration Votes in Question After Trump Weighs In
Whip count delayed after president tells Fox News he would not sign the emerging deal

Chief Deputy Whip Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., says GOP leaders are seeking clarity on the president’s position on immigration legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders are delaying until next week their plans to whip a compromise immigration bill as they seek clarity on President Donald Trump’s position on the measure, according to Chief Deputy Whip Patrick T. McHenry.

“House Republicans are not going to take on immigration without the support and endorsement of President Trump,” the North Carolina Republican said.

House GOP’s Fragile Immigration Deal Faces Uphill Battle
‘Hopefully, every time there’s a compromise, everyone can claim some victories’

Immigration rights activists chant during their May Day march in Washington to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies on May 1, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans were quick to congratulate themselves Wednesday after brokering a fragile path forward on immigration legislation and avoiding — for now — a bruising civil war less than six months before the midterm elections.

“This is an effort to bring our caucus together, our conference together, on immigration,” Speaker Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin told reporters. “I’m very pleased with our members.”

Immigration Discharge Petition Deadline Arrives
3 remaining signatures expected to be added Tuesday, but negotiations on alternative measure to continue

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., says an immigration discharge petition will get to the required 218 signatures without an agreement on separate immigration legislation House Republicans can pass. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The immigration discharge petition signature deadline has arrived. All signs point to the petition reaching the required 218 signatures by the end of the day, but negotiations are continuing in an effort to block it from forcing a vote.

The discharge petition, led by moderate Republicans, is designed to bypass House leadership and force a floor vote on a series of controversial immigration bills to protect so-called Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. 

‘She Would Love All This Fuss’ — Louise Slaughter Memorialized in the Capitol
Family, colleagues remember a trailblazing, tough and funny member of Congress

Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., speaks during a memorial service for Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, D-N.Y., in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall on Wednesday. Slaughter, in picture, passed away on March 16 at the age of 88. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Louise Slaughter dreamed that she would die in the Capitol.

That’s at least according to her daughter, Robin Slaughter Minerva, who spoke during a congressional memorial service for her mother on Wednesday in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

Pyeongchang Sendoff: Members of Congress Honor Olympians
Lawmakers celebrate skating Floridians, LGBT athletes and a brother-sister duo

Long track speed skater Erin Jackson is a constituent of Rep. Ted Yoho. (Courtesy Erin Jackson/Twitter)

A sunny town in Florida is sending three speedskaters to the Olympics — and it doesn’t even have an ice rink.

Erin Jackson, who trained on inline roller skates, grew up in Ocala. She is the first African-American woman to make the U.S. long track team.