Continuing Resolution

Full-Year CR Threatens Military Training, Hawks Say
Thornberry: “All but one deploying Army unit will cease training after July 15th”

House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, participates in House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's media availability with the Chairman's Task Force on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security in the Capitol on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The U.S. armed forces will see training severely curtailed if the continuing resolution funding the federal government is extended for the rest of the fiscal year, a leading lawmaker warned Wednesday.

Texas Republican Mac Thornberry, chairman of House Armed Services, said at a press breakfast that he has asked the military services what the effect would be of a full-year CR. He said he had not heard from all of them but offered a few startling examples.

Democrats Warn of Showdown Over Trump’s Border Wall
Senate Democratic leaders say there’s no plan for construction or getting Mexico to pay for it

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is warning of a funding standoff over building President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats are warning Republicans of a shutdown showdown if President Donald Trump insists on including funding for a wall along the Mexican border in April’s government funding bill.

“We believe it would be inappropriate to insist on the inclusion of such funding in a must-pass appropriations bill that is needed for the Republican majority in control of the Congress to avert a government shutdown so early in President Trump’s Administration,” the Senate Democratic leadership team, along with Appropriations ranking Democrat Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont, wrote in a letter to be circulated Monday.

Senators Cranky About Appropriations Process
Little appetite for another continuing resolution

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham had spoken against punting on appropriations bills last fall with a continuing resolution. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“I will never vote for a CR again.”

That was all the normally talkative Sen. Lindsey Graham cared to say when asked about the prospect of completing his State-Foreign Operations appropriations bill this year, or, as has become custom, funding that part of the government through another continuing resolution. The South Carolina Republican wants to create a new account to help countries in Eastern Europe battle Russian propaganda, something that wouldn’t happen if spending is just put on auto-pilot through a CR. 

Trump Taking a Bite Out of the Big Apple’s Police Budget
President’s New York protection costs estimated at $300,000 a day

New York Rep. Dan Donovan wants to see New York City law enforcement reimbursed for extra expenses when President Donald Trump is in the Big Apple. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A New York Republican is adding his name to the growing list of lawmakers who want to see local law enforcement reimbursed for the costs associated with protecting President Donald Trump when he isn’t at the White House. 

Rep. Dan Donovan on Tuesday asked the House Commerce-Justice-Science Appropriations Subcommittee to allocate additional money for the city of New York in the subcommittee’s fiscal 2018 spending bill. Donovan said the $7 million added to a continuing resolution in December does not come close to the actual costs incurred by the city to protect Trump and his family.

Get Ready, President Trump — It’s All Complicated
Keeping his gigantic campaign promises is likely to prove difficult

President Donald Trump may find out in the end that getting elected was the easy part, Murphy writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump laid out a grand vision to Congress last night of the plans he has to Make America Great Again — health care reform, tax reform, immigration reform, the Wall, a massive expansion of the military, reduction of the debt. More for less. Everything better. Everything safer. Everything great. Again.

But saying it is the easy part. Now comes the hard part. There is a vast expanse in Washington between promises and plans, and another expanse further to get to progress and achievement. That seemed to have finally dawned on Trump on Monday after he met with the National Governors Association at the White House and discussed health care reform.

White House Puts GOP in Awkward Position
Flynn fallout, security considerations keep dominating news

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wanted to talk about Cabinet nominations on Tuesday. But most of the questions at his press availability were about the latest scandals coming from the White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s domination of the news, whether due to the resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn or the spectacle of the president discussing national security at his Mar-a-Lago resort’s dining room, is putting Republican leaders in an awkward position.

“Look, I — I — you’ll have to ask those — the White House those kinds of questions,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday at his traditional media availability after the Republicans’ policy lunch. 

It’s Huge: Trump Administration Sets Record with Empty OMB Director Slot
S.C. Republican Rep. Mick Mulvaney still waiting for confirmation

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., President Donald Trump’s nominee to be director of the Office of Management and Budget, testifies during his Senate Budget Committee confirmation on January 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s slow pace in confirming Cabinet nominees appears to be holding up lawmakers’ work on major fiscal legislation while they wait for President Donald Trump’s budget shop to get up and running.

The White House needs to move on budget priorities and discretionary spending levels for fiscal 2018; a wrap-up of fiscal 2017 appropriations; and supplemental funding requests to boost military spending and begin construction of a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

The Quieter Assault Against Obamacare
Democrats fault GOP tactic for problems

Some supporters of former President Barack Obama’s signature health care law blame a Republican tactic as partly responsible for many of the failures in the law that the GOP says it must fix. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

The Republican drive to deliver a death blow to President Barack Obama’s health care law has overshadowed a quieter assault using annual government funding bills that’s gone on for years. 

It’s not as glamorous or high-decibel as the news conferences and floor debates surrounding the repeal of the law, but it certainly has proved controversial. What’s more, the law’s supporters see this GOP tactic as partly responsible for many of the failures in the law that Republicans now say they must fix.

Anti-Abortion Marchers Describe New Optimism in Era of Trump
Pence, Conway, tell March for Life crowd that Trump will support their cause

Participants raise their hands in prayer near the Washington Monument during the speaking program of the annual March for Life on Friday, January 27, 2017. Attendees marched from the monument to Capitol Hill to oppose abortion. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For most of her life, Gina Garvey has trekked to the Washington mall to join abortion opponents in the annual March for Life.

On Friday, the crowd was similar to so many others she had seen: people hoisting signs that denounced Planned Parenthood and declared that life is beautiful; nuns and priests in habits; school groups in colorful knit hats; so many people that at times it was difficult to move.

Oversight Panel Democrats Want Flint Investigation Reopened

Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, right, and Ranking Member Elijah Cummings, D-Md., talk before a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in Rayburn Building. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee want to reopen its investigation into the Flint, Mich., water crisis, according to a letter written by ranking member Elijah E. Cummings of Maryland and released Wednesday.

The investigation, which led to a high profile oversight hearing that turned into partisan finger-pointing last March, was quietly closed before the Christmas holiday by Chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah.