Congressional Districts

More diverse Pennsylvania and Florida districts might shape 2020 politics
Both states have grown in population, and many of their congressional districts have become more racially and ethnically diverse.

Protesters hold signs at a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after a June 27 ruling ruling on the census. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Pennsylvania and Florida, two swing states President Donald Trump narrowly won in 2016, may look substantially different next year, as new census data shows them trending away from his base.

Both states have grown in population, and many of their congressional districts have become more racially and ethnically diverse. However, that growth hasn’t been uniform and that may have implications for local politics in 2020 and beyond.

House to Codify Guidelines for Virtual Town Halls
Measure would provide spending guidance on joint events

Members wishing to conduct joint virtual town halls will get some guidance from legislation set for approval by the House Administration Committee. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New rules are coming to the House for members hosting virtual town hall meetings with constituents back in their districts.

The House Administration Committee takes up a resolution Wednesday that will codify regulations for lawmakers teaming up to do joint town hall meetings on the internet.

Ep. 49: Democrats Turning Up the Heat to Flip a Georgia District
The Week Ahead

TWA-Ep.49-FINAL

This could be the Democrats best chance, says CQ Roll Call reporters Simone Pathé and Greg Tourial, to flip Georgia's 6th District, where Republicans are scrambling to stop Democrat Jon Ossoff from winning in an April 18 all-party primary. @ossoff #FlipThe6th

Quiz: Which Member Of Congress Represents This National Landmark?
Some Members of Congress are especially lucky

Exterior view of the historic Alamo shortly after sunrise.

The Empire State Building, the Alamo, the Gateway Arch - they've all got a member of Congress proud to count those national landmark as a part of their district. Can you guess who represents which one?  

Supreme Court Sides With States On Redistricting
'One-person, one-vote' principle upheld in drawing legislative districts

The Supreme Court's ruling essentially maintains the status quo nationwide, as almost all states use total population to redraw their state districts based on the “one-person, one-vote” principle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states can draw state legislative districts based on total population, rejecting a challenge that would require districts to be equalized by another criteria, such as registered voters.  

The ruling essentially maintains the status quo nationwide, as almost all states use total population to redraw their state districts based on the “one-person, one-vote” principle.