Congressional Baseball Game

Get a Go Pro View of the Congressional Women's Softball Game
 

By the Numbers: How the Teams Stack Up
A look at the stats to determine which team has the statistical edge in this year’s matchup

Democratic Rep. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana is statistically one of the best players in the history of the Congressional Baseball Game. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This story was originally published in the official game program of the 56th annual Roll Call Congressional Baseball Game, which was distributed on June 15.

So you think you’re a numbers whiz regarding all things Congress. You know how much money is in the latest appropriations bill. You know by how much Sen. Rand Paul won his last election. But do you know lawmakers’ vital statistics where it counts — on the baseball diamond?

Watch Exclusive Behind-the-Plate Video from the Congressional Baseball Game
 

Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., the starting catcher for the Republican team in Thursday night's game against the Democratic team, attached Roll Call's Go Pro camera to the top of his catcher's mask for an up-close view of the action.

Baseball Game Brings Out Bipartisan Best in Lawmakers
 

Baseball Game Brings Out Bipartisan Best in Lawmakers
 

The History of the Congressional Baseball Game, 108 Years In

A Note to Our Readers
Roll Call extends its longtime support for the Congressional Baseball Game

Reps. Cedric Richmond, D-La., right, and Steve Scalise, R-La., play during the Republicans' 8-7 victory in the 55th Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park, June 23, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

To our readers,

Partisan rancor reached new levels during the past election season and has persisted through political tussles over policy.

Shooting Victims Come from All Walks of Hill Life
Majority whip among those injured at Republican baseball team practice

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot Wednesday morning at a Republican congressional baseball team practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A member of congressional leadership, two members of his security detail, a young Hill staffer and a lobbyist — a microcosm of the often hierarchical but interconnected life on Capitol Hill — were all injured at Wednesday morning’s GOP baseball team practice.

The shooting of Majority Whip Steve Scalise, as a member of House leadership, has garnered the most attention.

Trump Gets a Taste of Obama's Bitter Legacy with Mass Shootings