Collin C Peterson

Word on the Hill: White House Easter Egg Roll
Your social calendar for the week

Young attendees roll Easter eggs on the South Lawn of the White House last year. The first White House Easter Egg Roll was held in 1878 under President Rutherford B. Hayes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 139th annual White House Easter Egg Roll is happening today on the South Lawn.

Festivities take place from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and both President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are expected to take part.

Minnesota’s Rick Nolan Facing Big Decision on Governor Run
DFL congressman’s seat would be a top GOP pickup opportunity

Rep. Rick Nolan, seen here with his wife Mary in Brainerd, Minnesota, last year, says he’s now closer to a 2018 run for governor in the North Star State. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As he heads out of Washington for two weeks back home in Minnesota, Democratic-Farmer-Labor Rep. Rick Nolan has a big decision to make that could have implications for his party’s efforts to retake the House majority in 2018. 

After Nolan outperformed Hillary Clinton by 12 points last fall in his 8th District, once again holding a rural seat Republicans are desperate to pick up, his allies in Minnesota started urging him to run for governor. 

House Democrats Who Opposed Obamacare Say Trump Never Approached Them
Collin Peterson: “I’d like to work with them, but they have not reached out“

Minnesota Rep. Collin Peterson says he voted against the 2010 health care law because he didn’t think it would work. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“We had no votes from the Democrats. They weren’t going to give us a single vote, so it’s a very difficult thing to do,” lamented President Donald Trump to reporters about 90 minutes after House Speaker Paul D. Ryan canceled the floor vote on the Republicans’ health care bill on March 24. 

But if Trump wanted Democrats, why didn’t he approach those who’d opposed President Barack Obama’s signature health care law in 2010?

Heard on the Hill This Week: Al Franken’s Hotdish and the Tallest Senator in Modern History

This week Roll Call’s Heard on the Hill reporter Alex Gangitano checked out a Minnesota cooking competition hosted by Sen. Al Franken. In addition to sampling some North Star State “hotdishes,” Alex sat down with new Sen. Luther Strange, the tallest senator in modern history.

Al Franken Explains the Minnesota Hotdish During Annual Cook-Off

The Minnesota Congressional Delegation Hotdish Competition was held Wednesday on Capitol Hill and Roll Call was there. Watch for who won (hint: it featured bear meat), who cheated (spoiler alert: someone didn’t just submit a hotdish to the hotdish cook-off) and lots and lots of warm food.

Peterson Exercises Right to Bear Arms to Win Hotdish Competition
Franken hosts the seventh annual Minnesota bake-off

From center left, Sen. Amy Klobucharand Rep. Betty McCollum size up the fare at the seventh annual Minnesota Congressional Delegation Hotdish Competition. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s that time of the year when Al Franken makes jokes and eats casserole. Or, as the Minnesota senator and his North Star State colleagues call it, hotdish.

Rep. Collin C. Peterson won the seventh annual Minnesota Congressional Delegation Hotdish Competition with his dish that had bear meat in it.

Word on the Hill: Hotdish Time
West Virginia, baseball and women

Last year's hotdish made by Minnesota Sen. Al Franken was titled "The Most Beautiful Hotdish in the World," in honor of Prince. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Minnesota tradition of eating “hotdish” and listening to Al Franken’s jokes is here again.

Franken is hosting the seventh annual Minnesota Congressional Delegation Hotdish Competition, and will be joined by Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Reps. Collin C. Peterson, Betty McCollum, Keith Ellison, Tim Walz, Rick Nolan, Erik Paulsen, Tom Emmer and Jason Lewis.

House Democrats Look Beyond DNC Chairman Race
They have no say in the election but hold high hopes for the winner

Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison is the only member of Congress running for the Democratic National Committee chairmanship. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional Democrats have little sway over who the next chairman of the Democratic National Committee will be. But the eventual winner — to be elected by DNC members this weekend in Atlanta — may play an important role in shaping the direction of a party that desperately needs help articulating its message and organizing ahead of the 2018 midterms.

“Right about now, they do nothing with the Congress. So anything would be an improvement,” Michigan Rep. Debbie Dingell, a former DNC member, said of the committee last week, outside the House chamber. 

NRCC Goes After Blue-Collar Districts in 2018
GOP campaign arm releases list of 36 initial targets

Rep. Tim Walz speaks with guests during a campaign event in Duluth for fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan last fall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee’s initial list of offensive targets for 2018 includes 36 Democrat-held districts, many in blue-collar areas of the country.

If Democrats are targeting the well-educated suburbs (see New Jersey’s 11th District, for example), where Donald Trump either barely won or underperformed, Republicans are going after many rural districts where Hillary Clinton underperformed the congressional ticket. 

The Incredible Shrinking Split Tickets
Midterm campaign field starts with just 35 crossover House districts

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller is the only Republican up for re-election in 2018 in a state not carried by Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For the latest evidence of the nation’s polarized politics, the granular returns from November offer these slivers of bright purple insight:

Voters in just 35 congressional districts, or 8 percent of the total, elected a House member from one party while preferring the presidential candidate of the other party — the second election in a row where the share of ticket-splitting seats was in the single digits. Before that, 1920 was the last time the number of such crossover districts fell below one out of every nine.