Christopher S Murphy

Baseball Coaches’ Bill Would Provide for Injured Capitol Police Officers
Barton and Doyle see ‘silver lining’ from GOP baseball shooting incident

Congressional baseball coaches, Reps. Mike Doyle of Pennsylvania, left, and Joe L. Barton of Texas have teamed up on a bill to help Capitol Police officers injured in the line of duty. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The congressional baseball coaches aren’t done talking about the positive outcomes of this year’s game: bipartisanship and support for the Capitol Police.

Reps. Joe L. Barton of Texas and Mike Doyle of Pennsylvania, the respective Republican and Democratic coaches, introduced a bill Wednesday that would expand the Capitol Police Memorial Fund to allow donations to go to officers injured in the line of duty.

McCain Absence Gives GOP More Time to Win — Or Lose — Health Care Votes
Schedule change could put focus back on Russia

With Sen. John McCain recuperating at home in Arizona from surgery, Senate GOP leaders are delaying consideration of the health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

That Sen. John McCain’s absence from the Capitol this week led Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to delay consideration of a bill to roll back the 2010 health care law is a sign of just how narrow the vote margin might be.

And it could bring the focus back to the chamber’s various Russia investigations.

The Senate at a Deliberative Crossroads
Health care debacle challenges unique traditions, process

Senate Republican Conference Chairman John Thune highlighted bipartisan work ongoing at the Commerce Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The release of the Senate Republicans’ draft health care measure, coming on the heels of the demise of the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees, provoked a spasm of hard feelings in the chamber and questions about whether senators could restore its now-quaint reputation as the World’s Greatest Deliberative Body. 

“This is not the role model in my world, but I also understand that when the Democrats say, ‘We’re not going to vote for anything,’ that limits the options,” said Sen. Jerry Moran, a Kansas Republican. “But, I would love to see a Senate that functions, in which all hundred senators have the opportunity to present ideas, amendments and take votes.”

Word on the Hill: House Men’s Workout
Vegan cooking and snacking

Oklahoma Rep. Markwayne Mullin, seen here with his daughter Larra at the Capitol on Wednesday, is a host of the annual men's workout. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As if you haven’t had enough bipartisan congressional athletic events, the annual Men’s Health Caucus workout is this morning, hosted by Reps. Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., and Donald M. Payne Jr., D-N.J.

It’s at 7 a.m. in the park across from the Longworth House Office Building. Samantha Clayton, director of Global Fitness at Herbalife Nutrition, and Clifton Crosby, former NFL player, will also be there.

In Search of Missing Bills, Congress Is on the Case
Today's search of CBO by Senate Democrats isn't the first time Congress has gone on the hunt

Sens. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, and Cory Booker, D-N.J., ride an elevator in the Ford Building after leaving the Senate just after a vote Tuesday to meet with the Congressional Budget Office Director Keith Hall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY GILLIAN ROBERTS and JASON DICK

Democratic senators started the week of June 19 on a mission — to find the Republican health care bill. Several senators took to the chamber’s floor early in the week to lament the absence of so-called regular order — a bill’s journey through subcommittee, committee and eventually the floor on its way toward consideration and possible passage — for the Senate’s version of the bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. Leadership has said the bill would be released Thursday with the expectation of a vote next week.

Vague Signs of Movement on GOP Health Care Measure
Legislative text could be available within days

Democratic Sens. Brian Schatz of Hawaii, Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Cory Booker of New Jersey take a selfie before a meeting with CBO Director Keith Hall in Ford Building where they asked for a copy of the Republicans' health care bill score. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senators returned to work on Tuesday in an escalating atmosphere of uncertainty about legislation to alter the U.S. health insurance system, with outstanding questions about the measure’s timing, cost and even the chamber’s committee schedule.

Before the Senate gaveled in, Democrats signaled they would invoke the so-called two-hour rule that restricts the time and duration of committee meetings. The upshot is that panels that meeting in the morning would largely be cut off after two hours, and any hearings scheduled to take place in the afternoon would be rescheduled.

Democrats Reclaim Congressional Baseball Title, Bipartisanship Rules
Night ends with gracious hand-over of trophy

California Rep. Jimmy Panetta slides in safe at home as GOP catcher Rep. Rodney Davis of Illinois tries to apply the tag during the the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats regained their mojo on Thursday night at Nationals Park with a commanding 11-2 victory over the Republicans at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game.

But with the tragic shooting during the Republicans’ team practice the day before, esprit de corps was the main game plan for both teams, dispelling for at least a night, the clouds of highly charged partisanship that has plagued both sides of the aisle this year.

Baseball Shooting Raises Lawmaker Protection Questions
Incident prompts discussion of security at practices and the Capitol

Alexandria Police line the street with police tape across the street from Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va., where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was shot during baseball practice. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Members of Congress know they could be targets of violence, but they didn’t see it coming at their early morning practice for the Congressional Baseball Game.

“It was absolutely a safe space. We get up at 5:30 in the morning, just to go play baseball,” said Rep. Mike Bishop. “It does rattle your sense of what’s safe and what isn’t.”

Members Thrilled That Congress Will Still Play Ball
Paul Ryan took the managers’ suggestions to hold the game

Reps. Chuck Fleischmann of Tennessee, right, and Rodney Davis of Illinois tell reporters about the shooting at the Republican's baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., on Wednesday after the congressmen arrived at the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Players in Thursday’s Congressional Baseball Game say they’ve already gotten a win in the decision to play the game as scheduled, after Wednesday’s shooting at the Republican team’s practice in Alexandria, Virginia.

“We’re going to play, we need to play,” said Texas Rep. Roger Williams, one of the Republican coaches, who was present at the practice and injured his ankle as players scrambled for cover. His staffer Zack Barth was wounded in the attack.

White House Changes Subject to Health Care
Democrats happy to discuss issue they see as winner for them

As Attorney General Jeff Sessions was testifying on the Russia scandal, both the White House and Democrats wanted to talk about health care. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday fanned the flames of the Russia scandal that hangs over Donald Trump’s presidency, the White House appeared eager to change the subject to health care.

And that appears to be just fine with Democrats amid a messaging war over the Republicans’ crafting of a replacement for the 2010 health care law that Trump claims will be “far better” than the Obama-era system.