Chris Collins

Bipartisan Pressure Mounts on Trump to Stay in Paris Agreement
Schumer: Leaving the deal would be a ‘historic mistake’

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney takes a break during testimony before a House Budget Committee hearing in Longworth Building titled “The President’s FY2018 Budget” on May 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House has continued to delay a decision on whether it will stay in the Paris climate agreement, but pressure is mounting on the president from both Republicans and Democrats to keep the U.S. in the deal, albeit for different reasons.

Democrats, like environmental groups, see the accord as crucial in efforts to slow global warming. And while many Republicans despise the deal, they fear leaving it would undermine U.S. global leadership and take away the opportunity to reshape, even weaken the accord.

Health Care Backlash Prompts MacArthur to Resign as Co-Chair of Tuesday Group
‘Clearly, our group is divided’

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., walks through Statuary Hall on his way to the House floor in the Capitol for the votes on repeal and replace of Obamacare on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Word on the Hill: Staffers Got Talent
Armed Forces Day tomorrow

Geoff Browning pursues his musical career on the side. (Courtesy Nicholas Fitanides/ Geoff Browning)

Geoff Browning, legislative assistant for Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., has a pretty serious music career on the side of his Capitol Hill job. 

His band, Of Tomorrow, is playing tonight at the 9:30 Club (815 V St., NW) with other musicians, including Karl Denson of the Rolling Stones, Melvin Seals of the wider Grateful Dead/Jerry Garcia Band family and Alan Evans of Soulive.

White House Turmoil Ramps Pressure on Vulnerable Republicans
Some are speaking out, others still waiting for more facts

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock, seen here with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan last year, said she cannot defend the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

By BRIDGET BOWMAN and SIMONE PATHÉ

No matter what he did or how much he tweeted during his first four months in office, President Donald Trump has mostly held on to the loyalty of congressional Republicans — even those who might have the most to lose at the ballot box next year. 

Lawmakers Greet Mueller Appointment With Relief
Rank and file smile, although GOP leaders remain reticent

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel by the Justice Department on Wednesday to investigate alleged Russian interference in last year’s election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By JOE WILLIAMS, LINDSEY McPHERSON and REMA RAHMAN

Even as House and Senate Republicans turned up the heat on the Trump White House for answers about the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey, Democrats got a big win when the Justice Department appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel to investigate alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 election, including any connections to the Trump presidential campaign.

Report: Ethics Office Investigating Chris Collins Investments
Inquiry over improperly attracting investors to biotech company

A newspaper reported investigators were interviewing several people who had invested in a company in which Rep. Chris Collins is the largest shareholder. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Office of Congressional Ethics is reportedly conducting an inquiry into whether Rep. Chris Collins improperly attracted investors to an Australian biotech company and gave a stock tip to then-Rep. Tom Price.

Citing two anonymous sources, the The Buffalo News reported several investors in the Buffalo area were being interviewed this week to look at potential roles played by Collins in urging investors to buy stock in the company.

Opinion: With Health Care Vote, House GOP Landed on Sitting Duck
Bill was legislative and political malpractice of the highest order

Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, conduct a news conference after the initial rollout of the American Health Care Act the day before. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans would have been better off passing a blank bill than the rancid stack of used toilet paper that squeaked by, 217-213, on Thursday.

All we really know about this bill for sure is that it would strip insurance entirely from tens of millions of Americans; endanger minimum health benefits previously guaranteed; slash Medicaid for the poorest and sickest in our country; create a $138 billion slush fund for state health programs; and give healthy tax cuts to the investor class.

How the House Finally Got to ‘Yes’ on Health Care
Frenzied final negotiations helped win over enough holdouts

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, center, and Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry lead a group of Republican members to the House floor Thursday to vote on the GOP health care bill after meeting with White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The final push on the health care bill started in earnest Monday night.

At 6 p.m., a cadre of Republican lawmakers from the Energy and Commerce Committee met in an unmarked Capitol office to make changes they hoped would bring moderate holdouts on board with the party’s overhaul of the health care system.

2018 Campaigns Already Racing to Define Health Care Bill
Groups focused on the midterms leaped into action after vote

Both parties are wasting no time in their post-health care vote messaging. Here, Lillian Potter-Saum listens to West Virginia Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin III at a town hall meeting in Martinsburg, W.Va., in March. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Health care is likely to be a central issue in the 2018 election cycle, and that messaging began within minutes of Thursday’s vote on the Republicans’ overhaul bill.

Now the race is on for both parties to sway voters. 

House GOP Optimistic Ahead of Health Care Vote
‘There were a lot of smiles in the room today’

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday before the House plans to vote on the heath care bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By ERIN MERSHON and KERRY YOUNG, CQ Roll Call

House Republicans started celebrating early Thursday, ahead of their vote to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.