Charles E Schumer

Trump to Stop Paying Obamacare Cost-Sharing Subsidies
Schumer and Pelosi: ‘American families will suffer just because President Trump wants them to’

President Donald Trump speaks as Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) left, Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta, third from right, and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, second from right, look on after Trump signed the executive order to loosen restrictions on Affordable Care Act "to promote health care choice and competition." (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The administration will stop reimbursing health insurers for the 2010 health care law’s controversial cost-sharing reduction payments, the White House said Thursday night.

“Based on guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services has concluded that there is no appropriation for cost-sharing reduction payments to insurance companies under Obamacare,” the White House Office of the Press Secretary said in a statement. “In light of this analysis, the Government cannot lawfully make the cost-sharing reduction payments.”

Why Trump’s Immigration Demands Haven’t Changed the Dynamics on Hill
Prospects for a bipartisan bill were already grim

A sign at an immigration rights protest in from on the White House on Sept. 5 to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out the DACA program. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump’s decision to push for his border wall as part of an immigration deal — after previously saying it would be dealt with separately — would, at first glance, seem to lower the probability of a bipartisan accord.

But the prospects were already grim. So Sunday’s release of Trump’s immigration policy priorities caused no major shift in the dynamics on Capitol Hill. 

Who Benefits From the State and Local Tax Deduction?
Roll Call analysis finds higher-income earners reap substantial returns from the deduction

Senate Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch is among the “Big Six” Republican tax negotiators. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

A fight within the Republican Party over a proposal to eliminate the state and local tax deduction threatens the future of the GOP effort to overhaul the U.S. tax code.

Battle lines have been drawn, as lawmakers from states that see substantial benefit from the deduction — such as New Jersey and New York — are already sounding alarms at the proposal to remove it. 

Trump Wants Democratic Support for Tax Bill but Slams Party
President addresses audience of long-haul truckers in Pennsylvania

President Donald Trump waves to journalists as he leaves the White House Wednesday to pitch the White House-GOP tax overhaul bill to long-haul truckers in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday again made clear he wants some Democratic support for an emerging White House-GOP tax overhaul bill. But he then accused Democrats of supporting massive tax hikes.

Speaking to an audience of long-haul truckers Wednesday evening in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Trump pledged to convince Republican lawmakers and “maybe some of those Democrats” to vote for the plan.

McConnell: Democratic ‘Blue Slips’ Won’t Block Trump Judges
Says objections home-state Democrats will only indicate dissent

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made his most pointed comments yet about judicial nominations. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made clear that Senate Republicans intend to get President Donald Trump’s judicial nominees confirmed no matter what obstacles the Democrats throw their way.

The Kentucky Republican has now confirmed he plans to move forward on judicial nominees even if home-state Democratic senators don’t return their so-called “blue slips” to the Judiciary Committee.

Trump Tweet Shows How Tough an Immigration Deal Will Be
President claims Democrats ‘don’t want secure borders’

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, left, makes a point to President Donald Trump in the Oval Office as White House Director of Legislative Affairs Marc Short looks on at the end of a Sept. 6 meeting in which they struck a deal on government funding and the debt ceiling. A deal on immigration policy appears harder. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump attacked congressional Democrats Tuesday morning, tweeting they “don’t want secure borders” and calling that the biggest hurdle that could sink efforts to craft an immigration bill.

The post on the president’s favorite social media site was part of an unusually early presidential Twitter storm that began shortly after 6 a.m. EDT — Trump’s morning tweets typically land between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. In other tweets, Trump threatened the NFL and confirmed he will sign an executive order later this week that will terminate regulations put in place by Barack Obama’s 2010 health law.

White House Rolls Out Immigration Bill Demands but Top Democrats Object
List of asks closely aligns with Trump’s ‘America First’ philosophy

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington on May 1. The White House rolled out its demands for a broad immigration bill on Sunday night. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration on Sunday evening unveiled a sweeping list of demands for immigration overhaul legislation that Congress is slated to take up by early next year. But senior Democrats are already signaling the White House’s demands could sink any such bill.

Senior White House and administration officials told reporters on a hastily arranged call that President Donald Trump wants an immigration bill he set in motion last month to include funding for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall, provisions aimed at cracking down on the flow of minors from Central and South America, a new merit-based legal immigration system and changes to the federal grant program for so-called “sanctuary cities.”

Budget Debate, Grievances Get Airing in Both Chambers

From left, Rep. Richard Neal, Sen. Ron Wyden, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer,  Rep. John Yarmuth, Rep. Barbara Lee, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and Sen. Bernie Sanders conduct a news conference in the Capitol Wednesday to speak out against Republicans’ tax and budget plan that they say will benefit the wealthy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Floor action on the fiscal 2018 budget resolution — made possible by assuaging conservatives’ concerns over the emerging tax overhaul blueprint last week — officially got under way on Wednesday.

The House voted 232-188 to approve parameters for debate and moved on to formally debating the resolution. Once the House and Senate formally adopt a joint budget resolution, if they can get that far, the tax-writing committees will be able to produce filibuster-proof tax legislation through the fast-track reconciliation process.

Analysis: In Puerto Rico, Trump Congratulates Himself
GOP mum on messaging; Schumer says enough

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing for Puerto Rico. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump arrived Tuesday in Puerto Rico and offered the hurricane-ravaged U.S. citizens not a truckload of drinkable water or fuel, but Trump himself and his team.

Trump’s day was one of countermessaging about his administration’s widely panned Puerto Rico relief efforts. He used a briefing minutes after he landed there to congratulate his team and solicit praise from Puerto Rican officials — lightly coaching them on what they should say.

Photos of the Week: Health Care Pulled, Tax Overhaul Pitched and Scalise’s Return
The week of Sept. 25 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., is seen in the Capitol after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the latest plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act had been pulled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

This week in Washington all eyes were once again on Republican leadership. After Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., pulled the party’s latest health care plan from the chamber floor, the focus shifted to the tax overhaul plan. And, on a non-policy front, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., made an emotional return to the chamber yesterday (watch what his colleagues from both sides of the aisle had to say about his speech).