Border Control

After Crowley's Defeat, Which Democrats Could Go Down Next?
Michael Capuano facing high-profile primary challenge in Massachusetts

Massachusetts Rep. Michael Capuano is one of several Bay State Democrats facing primary challenges later this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After the shocking primary defeat Tuesday night of the first Democratic incumbent of the cycle, attention immediately shifted to Massachusetts Rep. Michael E. Capuano

The 10-term Democrat has been facing a primary challenge from Ayanna Pressley, the first woman of color elected to the Boston City Council, for much of this year in his safe Democratic district.

Trump Doubles Down on No Due Process for Migrants
But Sen. King says ‘they have a right to establish their claim of asylum’

From left, Democratic Reps. Joe Crowley, Jan Schakowsky, actor John Cusack, Luis Gutierrez, John Lewis, Al Green, Judy Chu, and Pramila Jayapal sit at the entrance to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in Washington in protest of the Trump administration's separating parents and children at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday doubled down on his call for undocumented immigrants who enter the United States illegally to be sent back to their native countries without any due process before an American judge.

Trump first made the claim in a Sunday tweet following his Saturday contention during remarks before the Nevada Republican Party that Democrats want to open the southern border so the violent MS-13 gang can spread “all over our country.”

‘Zero Tolerance’ Remains in Effect as First Lady Visits Migrant Kids
POTUS says one thing about prosecutions, newspaper another, DOJ something else

First lady Melania Trump smiles after signing a welcome poster made for her at the Upbring New Hope Childrens Center operated by Lutheran Social Services of the South and contracted with the Department of Health and Human Services June 21, 2018 in McAllen, Texas. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The White House policy prosecuting all adults who enter the United States illegally remains in place even if they arrive with children, President Donald Trump said as his wife defiantly toured a southern border detention center.

Trump defended the “zero tolerance” policy at the conclusion of a Cabinet meeting at the White House amid confusion about the status of the program and the fates of detained migrant families.

Trump Heads to Hill After Sowing Confusion on Immigration
President, Democrats in war of words over family separation policy

President Donald Trump will huddle with House Republicans on Tuesday afternoon to discuss two immigration overhaul bills. After signaling his opposition last week, he says he supports both. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Senior White House officials say Democrats enraged by the Trump administration’s policy of separating migrant families should negotiate with Donald Trump. Yet when the president heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday afternoon, he will see only Republican faces.

White House aides want to use the meeting to allow the president, in his own words, to clear up confusion he sowed in the House GOP conference late last week over its dueling immigration bills. He is expected to endorse both measures, with senior administration officials contending both would address the migrant separation issue.

Photos of the Week: A Parade, Virginia Holds Primaries and, of Course, the Baseball Game
The week of June 11 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

A Capitol Visitor Center employee stops to smell the long strands of lei draped on Hawaii’s King Kamehameha statue in the Capitol Visitor Center on Kamehameha Day on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Lawmaker Collapses at Immigration Rally
Rep. Joe Crowley fell to ground at protest in front of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

From left, Reps. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., actor John Cusack, Luis Gutierrez, R-Ill., John Lewis, D-Ga., Al Green, D-Texas, Judy Chu, D-Calif., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and others sit on the 14th Street NW, entrance to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in protest of the Trump Administration’s policy of separating parents and children at the border on June 13th.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

New York Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley collapsed Wednesday at a rally in Washington to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policy allowing parents and children of illegal immigrants to be separated at the border.

“Until they arrest us, we will stay here, however long it takes,” protesters chanted just as Crowley fell to the street in front of U.S. Customs & Border protection, according to a tweet from a CNN reporter who was at the scene.

Opinion: It’s the Summer of No Love for American Tourism
The economy is part of the immigration debate, whether we like it or not

America’s tourism industry has taken a hit in the Trump era, and that could spell trouble for the economy, Megan and Brown write. Above, travelers arrive at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport in April. (Scott Olson/Getty Images file photo)

Graduation season is wrapping up and summer vacation season is just beginning, rites of passage enjoyed by Americans and visitors alike. Foreign tourists flock to America’s beaches, parks and cities, and students travel from all over the world to study in our world-class universities. But data suggests this summer may bring fewer of both.

Tourists and students account for roughly 80 percent of total non-immigrant visas issued by the U.S. each year. They spur demand for goods and services, which pads economic growth and helps to power the tourism industry and higher education system.

Congress’ Focus on Opioids Misses Larger Crisis
‘All the bills are tinkering around the edges,’ one health official says

Targeting prescription opioids puts Congress years behind the crisis, which is largely driven by illicit nonprescription drugs. Above, heroin users at a New York City park in May. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By SANDHYA RAMAN, ANDREW SIDDONS and MARY ELLEN McINTIRE

Congress faced a startling public health and political problem throughout 2016 as the number of people dying from opioid addiction climbed. The number of Americans succumbing to drug overdoses more than tripled between 1999 and 2015, affecting a whiter and more geographically diverse population than previous drug crises. Lawmakers ultimately approved some modest policies aimed at curbing prescription drug abuse and provided $1 billion to support state efforts.

Podcast: Putting Trump's Immigration Crackdown in Context
CQ on Congress, Episode 105

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington before their May Day march to the White House to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's immigration policies on May 1, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump's move to criminally prosecute migrants crossing the border illegally, and to separate them from their children, aims to end the longstanding practice of releasing immigrants into the country, pending deportation, says CQ immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro. Trump's also boosting enforcement inside the country, but sanctuary city policies are impeding his efforts, explains Ariel Ruiz Soto of the Migration Policy Institute.

Show Notes:

Committees Tackle Politically Powerful Issue of Opioids Legislation
Senate HELP panel advanced bipartisan package Tuesday

Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, chairs the House Energy and Commerce Health Subcommittee, which will consider over 60 bills to address the opioids crisis at a Wednesday markup. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House heads into a marathon opioid markup Wednesday, a day after the Senate health committee approved bipartisan legislation of its own addressing the crisis. Both chambers are eager to advance bills to combat the crisis under an aggressive timeline, with an eye toward demonstrating action before the midterms on an issue that affects voters representing most demographics and districts.

“Even though this epidemic is worse in some parts of the country than others, find me a congressional district where this isn’t an issue,” said Keith Humphreys, a drug policy expert at Stanford. “Absolutely, they do not want to go into an election and have their constituents mad at them.”