Bob Corker

Photos of the Week: Puppies, Pence and Press Conferences
The week of Feb. 13 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks with reporters after the Senate policy luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As a resignation and withdrawn Cabinet nominee rocked the White House this week, Congress was at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue proceeding through consideration of several other Cabinet nominees, debating Obamacare alternatives and much more. 

On the lighter side of this Valentine's Day week, some pets up for adoption stopped by the Capitol to bring love to staffers and members alike.

Word on the Hill: Trailblazer Awards
Astronaut is testifying in the House

Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings will receive a Trailblazer Award from the Congressional Black Associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This Black History Month, the Congressional Black Associates will honor five people for their contributions to the community in their annual Trailblazer Awards ceremony.

This year’s awardees are Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., and Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black, and Hill veterans Michael McQuerry, Jaqueline Ellis (posthumously) and Jennifer DeCasper.

Senate Democrats Coalesce on Demands for Russia Probe
Minority party hopes public attention forces issue on GOP

Schumer, center, Sen. Mark Warner and Sen. Dianne Feinstein at a news conference on investigating former national security adviser Michael Flynn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats have laid out their demands for independent investigations into potential contact between Russian officials and members of President Donald Trump’s team, and are hopeful public outcry will force the administration and congressional Republicans to comply.

Democrats held what they called an “emergency” caucus meeting Wednesday to discuss former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn’s resignation following revelations he discussed sanctions with Russia’s  ambassador to the United States before Trump took office. The meeting also followed a New York Times report that a handful of Trump officials had been in contact with Russian intelligence officers leading up to the presidential election.

Ashton Kutcher’s Lovefest With the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
Actor speaks on his organization’s efforts to stop human trafficking

Actor Ashton Kutcher, co-founder of Thorn: Digital Defenders of Children, prepares to testify during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Everyone agreed on two things in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee: Human trafficking should be stopped and Ashton Kutcher should be swooned over.

The actor, co-founder of Thorn: Digital Defenders of Children, an organization that works to combat human trafficking, testified at the committee’s Ending Modern Slavery: Building on Success hearing on Wednesday.

Word on the Hill: Ashton Kutcher Meets Bob Corker
Save the date for black history in D.C.

Chairman Bob Corker and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will hear testimony from a celebrity today. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., will welcome actor Ashton Kutcher to Capitol Hill today to testify before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee about U.S. efforts to end modern slavery.

The “That ’70s Show” star is a co-founder of Thorn: Digital Defenders of Children, an organization that works to combat human trafficking. The hearing precedes the END IT Movement’s fifth annual “Shine a Light on Slavery” day on Feb. 23.

Trump Hill Backers Provide Cover After Flynn Departure
Republicans say there's no reason to question president's judgement

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., is interviewed by a television crew in the Cannon rotunda. He defended President Trump on Tuesday after his national security adviser resigned. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Some of President Donald Trump’s earliest and most vocal congressional supporters offered him political cover Tuesday, chalking up the first-month dismissal of his national security adviser as merely an inevitable early stumble.

GOP Rep. Chris Collins of New York, an early Trump supporter who was his transition team’s congressional liaison, was quick to protect the president’s flank after Michael Flynn resigned on Monday night. But few other Republican members flocked to television cameras on Trump’s behalf.

Trump Tries to Change the Subject on Flynn
'The real story here is why are there so many illegal leaks coming out of Washington?' president tweets

President Donald Trump had little to say about National Security Adviser Michael Flynn’s resignation, but plenty to say about the leaks that exposed him. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Normally a prolific morning tweeter, President Donald Trump was notably silent until mid-morning after the resignation of his national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Trump didn’t mention his former adviser by name, but instead commented on the situation surrounding Flynn’s departure and the leaks about the White House.

No Party Line for GOP on Flynn Fallout
Members left to guess about next steps in inquiry

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks with reporters as he heads to a briefing in the Capitol Visitor Center on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans were swarmed on Tuesday with questions about what President Donald Trump knew and when did he know about former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s questionable interactions with Russian authorities. But there was little consensus on the best venue for getting to the bottom of it.

“I think it’s good for the American people to understand, in a fulsome way, everything that’s happened. And to get it behind us,” Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker said. “This is going to go on forever if we don’t address it somehow.”

Bannon’s Power Spawns Fears of Frozen-Out Congress
Cummings: Lawmakers ‘beginning to wonder what is going on’

Steve Bannon, and Kellyanne Conway, aides to President Donald Trump, are seen on the West Front of the Capitol after Trump was sworn in as the 45th president on Jan. 20. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Whether President Donald Trump is honoring his Defense secretary, addressing reporters with the British prime minister or talking to a foreign leader in the Oval Office, his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, is never far away.

Bannon’s casual blazers and tousled salt-and-pepper hair give him an everyman appearance, but lawmakers and experts are concerned the former Breitbart News executive and a few other top Trump aides are orchestrating an aggressive effort to consolidate power in the Oval Office.

In Gorsuch, Trump Saw Plenty of Scalia-Like Qualities
President hopes ‘Democrats and Republicans can come together’ around nominee

President Donald Trump (R) shakes hands with Judge Neil Gorsuch after nominating him to the Supreme Court during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House on Tuesday evening. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s own description of what he wanted in a Supreme Court nominee sounded a lot like the late Justice Antonin Scalia. And though he opted for reality show-like drama, Trump made it clear he believes his pick, Neil Gorsuch, would follow Scalia’s example.

Trump, the former “Apprentice” host and executive producer, used some reality television-like flair to announce his pick, keeping Gorsuch and his wife, Louise, sequestered just outside the White House’s East Room. He came out alone, and minutes later, summoned them from behind an ornate brown door.