Bob Corker

GOP Primaries Could Hamper Plans on Taxes
Vulnerable Republican incumbents pose a challenge for McConnell

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange faces former Judge Roy Moore in a crucial Senate primary runoff next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican hopes for moving an ambitious tax package in a closely divided Senate may hinge on a number of incumbents on the ballot, including Luther Strange of Alabama, who faces a tough primary runoff on Sept. 26.

The vulnerability of Republican incumbents like Strange underscores the challenges facing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he tries to hold together at least 50 votes in his 52-member conference to pass a partisan tax plan under a filibuster-proof reconciliation bill.

Tennessee Republicans Prepare for Another Senate Primary
Field will grow if Bob Corker retires; Blackburn and Fincher could run

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker is facing at least one primary challenger, with a few more looking at getting in the race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker asked President Donald Trump to campaign for Alabama Sen. Luther Strange ahead of next week’s Senate Republican runoff, he might have had a little self-preservation in mind. 

A win by Roy Moore, the controversial former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, would throw a wrench into the deliberative body in which the moderate Tennessee Republican serves. But a Moore victory could also embolden primary challengers to other sitting senators, like Corker.

Republican Senators Mostly Silent After Trump’s North Korea Threat
President would hit regime, military targets - not civilians, White House says

Republican Sens. Bob Corker (center), Marco Rubio (seated right) and Jim Risch (standing right) all declined to comment on GOP President Donald Trump's threat to "totally destroy" North Korea if it attacks the United States. Also pictured are GOP Sens. Cory Gardner (standing left) and Ron Johnson (seated left). (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker hurried into an elevator. Sen. Marco Rubio quickly ducked into the Capitol Visitor Center television studio. And Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain shut down reporters’ repetitive questions.

No Republican senator could be found Tuesday who was willing to question President Donald Trump’s threat before the United Nations General Assembly to “totally destroy” North Korea unless it gives up its nuclear arms and long-range missile programs, which he views as a direct threat to the sovereignty and security of the United States and its allies.

Trump Encouraged Corker to Seek Another Term, Despite Recent Friction
Tennessee senator to decide legislative future ‘very, very soon’

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., was encouraged to run for re-election by President Donald Trump in a face-to-face meeting last Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump encouraged Sen. Bob Corker to seek a third term in a face-to-face meeting last week even though the two butted heads throughout August and September, the Tennessean reported Monday.

The Tennessee Republican has asked multiple members of the GOP brass, including the president and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, for advice as he weighs whether to re-up for another term or return to the private sector, where he was a construction and real estate titan before entering public service.

Opinion: How Donald Trump Made Congress Great Again
It may help the country — if not the president

President Donald Trump’s rocky relationship with lawmakers has made Congress free enough to act in the country’s best interests, Murphy writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

If you were a member of Congress, especially a Republican member of Congress, you could be forgiven for having at least some contempt for President Donald Trump.

He’s used the GOP-led Congress as a punching bag and a scapegoat. He demands absolute loyalty from Republican members, but abandoned them last week the moment he saw an opening to strike a deal to raise the debt ceiling with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Opinion: The Two-Party System on a Sick Bed
It will take more than Trump and infighting to kill the patient

The two-party system is here to stay despite rocky times in the recent past and ahead, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It is as lasting an American literary metaphor as Captain Ahab and the white whale or Hester Prynne and her scarlet “A.”

We are, of course, referring to that branch of science known as cartoon thermodynamics. The first law, as popularized by the late film critic Roger Ebert, is worthy of Isaac Newton: “Any body suspended in space will remain in space until made aware of its situation.”

Report: Corker Weighing Re-election or Retirement
Source says Tennessee Republican senator has talked to McConnell about his future

While Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., is deliberating whether to run again in 2018, he's taking steps for a campaign. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker is weighing whether to run for re-election in 2018 or retire.

Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told CNN last week that he was weighing the decision.

Trump Tries to Embarrass Another GOP Senator Via Twitter
President: Sen. Corker criticizes after asking for re-election advice

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, and Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., on stage during a rally in Raleigh, N.C., in July 2016. The duo have been waging a war of words in recent days. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump dinged Sen. Bob Corker on Friday morning, tweeting he finds the Republican lawmaker’s recent criticism odd since he has “constantly” sought the president’s advice about his re-election prospects in Tennessee.

Trump tweeted Corker’s remarks last week that Trump has yet to show he possesses the “stability” and “competence” to perform the duties of the presidency are “strange” because the lawmaker “is constantly asking me whether or not he should run again in ’18.”

Word on the Hill: Flake Honored for Courage Under Fire
Staffer recognized by HBCUs, and CODEL news

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., walks away from the scene of the shooting at the Republican baseball team’s practice in Alexandria, Va., in June. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the same day that President Donald Trump was bashing him at a rally in Phoenix, Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., was honored Tuesday in Tucson by Arizona sheriffs for his actions during the shooting at the Republicans’ Congressional Baseball Game practice in June.

Flake was recognized by the Pima County Sheriff’s Department and the Arizona Sheriffs Association for running from cover to help House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., who was seriously wounded, and for calling Scalise’s wife to inform her about what happened.

Fact Check: What Trump Stretched, Omitted and Ignored in Phoenix
President used his own version of events to fire up a friendly crowd

On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump uttered a string of false and questionable statements during a campaign rally in Phoenix. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s volatile Tuesday campaign rally in Phoenix was full of misleading statements, from his handling of the Charlottesville, Virginia, racial unrest and media coverage of his presidency to Revolutionary War- and Confederate-era statues and the Senate’s rules.

The omissions, exaggerations and stretching of the truth ranged from the trivial to outright misrepresentations. Some aspects of the speech might even complicate the pursuit of his own legislative agenda.