Billy Long

Floor Charts for the Floor Show
Our favorite visual aids from congressional floor-watching

(Courtesy @FloorCharts screenshot of C-SPAN)

From tributes to senators to hours of testimony from a tech giant, spring has been a visual mixed bag in Congress.

Lawmakers like these oversized and sometimes garish visual aids because they help them get their point across. The Twitter handle @FloorCharts posts some of the daily highlights, and we’re doing a monthly roundup of the best of the best.

Photos of the Week: Ryan’s Done (Almost), Zuckerberg Testifies and 2 New Lawmakers Make Entrances
The week of April 9 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees on the protection of user data on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Congress returned from its spring recess to a busy week, made busier when Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced he would not seek re-election in November.

Also this week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spent three days on the Hill meeting with lawmakers and testifying on improper use of his company’s customers’ data. And there’s a new senator — Mississippi Republican Cindy Hyde-Smith — and a new House member — Pennsylvania Democrat Conor Lamb — after two swearings-in this week. 

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Ex-Obama official ‘apologizes’ to Rand Paul, last looks at cherry blossoms, and Mullin celebrates his heritage

Rep. Billy Long, R-Mo., takes a picture of the media before a House Energy and Commerce Committee in Rayburn Building on the protection of user data featuring testimony by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

The State of the Union From Start to Finish: Photos of the Day
Jan. 30 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Trump takes a selfie with Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., in the House chamber after the address. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated as of 12:02 p.m. on Jan. 31 | The Capitol is a busy place most Tuesdays, but this Tuesday was special. President Donald Trump’s first State of the Union address at 9 p.m. ET made for a chaotic (and long) day for lawmakers, their aides, reporters and Capitol staff.

Trump to Tout Tax Overhaul in Missouri
Two main talking points focus on middle class

President Donald Trump arrives with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for the Republican Senate Policy luncheon in the Capitol to discuss the tax reform bill on November 28, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump will “be a part of pushing this process forward” when he heads to St. Charles, Missouri, Wednesday to tout the tax overhaul package, two senior administration officials said Tuesday.

The officials told reporters on a conference call to expect a message similar to Trump’s August speech in Springfield, Missouri.

Let Us Now Praise President Donald Trump
Republicans describe their rally with president

President Donald Trump makes a brief statement to the media as Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, right, look on, after a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol to discuss the GOP’s tax reform bill on November 16, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Unbelievably engaging.”Mark Meadows, N.C.

Breitbart Mocked for Trying to Discredit Washington Post’s Roy Moore Exposé
Story on conservative site appears to confirm original report

GOP candidate for U.S. Senate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl when he was 32. It is yet unclear what effect the report will have on his election odds. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The popular alt-right website Breitbart News Network was the object of ridicule Sunday after it published a story ostensibly to discredit the Washington Post’s exposé on U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama.

The Breitbart story’s critics said it actually appeared to bolster the meticulous journalism the Post reporters used to secure on-the-record interviews with four women who say they were teenagers when Moore tried to date or had sexual contact with them when he was in his mid-30s.

Word on the Hill: Weekend Plans?
WOTH will be back mid-August

It's finally the weekend so get out of the Capitol — and the capital. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s the weekend in Washington and the Senate recess has finally arrived, so pick up a book from our summer reading list, or if you're feeling active, try to beat the number of steps that Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., takes in a day.

HOH went for a walk with the congressman recently and ran some errands around the complex with him.

At the Races: Royce Challenger Gives Himself $2 Million Head Start
First woman Marine combat pilot challenges Barr in Kentucky; former Obama ambassador running in Colorado

California insurance executive Andy Thorburn kicked off his challenge to Republican Rep. Ed Royce with a $2 million loan to his campaign. (Andy Thorburn for Congress)

A new Democratic challenger to California Republican Rep. Ed Royce is kicking off his candidacy by pumping $2 million into his campaign and an ad with him being sent to jail.

Insurance executive Andy Thorburn released a video Tuesday announcing he would challenge Royce and that he is willing to use his personal wealth to back up his campaign. Thorburn told the Los Angeles Times that he had deferred running for office because of the difficulty of balancing campaigning and running his business, but the election of President Donald Trump changed that.

Bipartisan Pressure Mounts on Trump to Stay in Paris Agreement
Schumer: Leaving the deal would be a ‘historic mistake’

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney takes a break during testimony before a House Budget Committee hearing in Longworth Building titled “The President’s FY2018 Budget” on May 24, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House has continued to delay a decision on whether it will stay in the Paris climate agreement, but pressure is mounting on the president from both Republicans and Democrats to keep the U.S. in the deal, albeit for different reasons.

Democrats, like environmental groups, see the accord as crucial in efforts to slow global warming. And while many Republicans despise the deal, they fear leaving it would undermine U.S. global leadership and take away the opportunity to reshape, even weaken the accord.