Bill Cassidy

John McCain Asked Son-In-Law to ‘Take Care Of’ His Daughter
Arizona senator released from hospital last week after surgery for intestinal infection

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer last July. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. John McCain asked his son-in-law over the weekend to “take care of” his daughter as he continues to receive treatment for complications connected to glioblastoma, a potent form of brain cancer.

“John hugged me tonight. He asked me to take care of Meghan. I said I would,” political pundit Ben Domenech, who is married to the Arizona Republican’s daughter Meghan McCain, tweeted Saturday.

McCain at Home Recovering From Another Surgery
No timetable for senator’s return to Washington

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., shown here in December, has been discharged from the hospital and is recovering from surgery at home in Arizona. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. John McCain has been discharged from the hospital and spent time at his ranch in Arizona on Monday night, according to a tweet from his wife, Cindy.

Last Sunday, McCain, 81, was admitted to Mayo Clinic in Phoenix and underwent surgery to treat an intestinal infection related to diverticulitis, his office announced in a press release last week. He emerged from the operation in stable condition.

Dragging an Energy Bill From the Ashes
For their bipartisan bill, Murkowski and Cantwell are willing to try, try again

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski and ranking member Maria Cantwell, here in 2016, are still hoping their bipartisan bill will get somewhere this session. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amid a forest of judicial appointments and other Trump administration confirmation votes, lawmakers pushing a bipartisan energy and natural resources bill in the Senate are still taking whacks in hope of moving legislation — or parts of it — before the end of this Congress.

The bill would represent the first major energy policy update in a decade, with provisions to bolster cybersecurity, speed up permits for energy infrastructure and promote energy efficiency. It could represent a rare opportunity for energy-state lawmakers to bring home some policy victories ahead of the midterm election.

Senators Target Physicians, Drugmakers in Opioid Bill
Bipartisan group hopes to make headway on drug crisis

Sens. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., right, and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., were among the senators introducing legislation to address the opioid crisis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan group of senators on Tuesday introduced legislation that would waive limits on physicians treating addiction patients and place restrictions on how long a provider could initially prescribe opioids to patients.

The bill, known as CARA 2.0, would address the opioid epidemic from several angles, including both health care providers and drugmakers. It aims to build on earlier opioid legislation, which cleared in 2016 as part of a broader health care measure that included mental health changes and aimed to spur new medical treatments.

Senate Confirms Army Corps Chief
Get-out-of-town vote was overwhelmingly bipartisan

Senators confirmed the new head of the Army Corps of Engineers and then headed home. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate voted 89-1 Thursday to confirm Rickey Dale “R.D.” James to lead the Army Corps of Engineers, which will serve as the chamber’s get-out-of-town vote after a long haul of days that involved the government shutdown over the weekend. 

Earlier in the week, the chamber had expected to approve James by voice vote on Wednesday before a roll call vote on the nomination was scheduled for Thursday afternoon. Afterward, senators headed for the exits. 

Vitter’s Wife Nominated by Trump for Federal Judgeship in Louisiana
Wendy Vitter stayed with her husband amid ‘D.C. Madam’ scandal

Wendy Vitter is seen here in 2005 as her husband, Louisiana Sen. David Vitter, is sworn in to the 109th Congress by Vice President Dick Cheney. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump nominated former Louisiana Sen. David Vitter’s wife for a federal judgeship in Louisiana on Tuesday.

Wendy Vitter, who currently serves as general counsel of the Roman Catholic Church of the Archdiocese of New Orleans, would become a U.S. district court judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana upon confirmation in the Senate.

47 Images of the Wild Ride That Was 2017 in Congress
The year in photos as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

1. January 6: Carrying the Electoral College ballot boxes, Senate pages lead a procession through the Capitol Rotunda into the House chamber, where Congress certified the results of the 2016 presidential election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With 2017 coming to a close, Roll Call sorted through its photo archive for some of our best images of the year.

Graham Urges Full Health Care Repeal in 2018, Despite Tricky Math
Moving on from health care debate an ‘unpardonable sin,’ senator says

While GOP Senate leaders like Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, left, have shifted away from health care repeal as a priority, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., right, said it should remain at the top of the agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Senate Republican leadership signaled this week it will table efforts to dismantle the 2010 health care law in 2018 and instead focus on market stabilization, at least one GOP senator insists repealing and replacing it is still a top priority.

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said it would be an “unpardonable sin” for Republicans to shift their focus from overhauling the health care system created by the so-called Obamacare legislation.

Senate Republicans Weigh Next Steps for Roy Moore
Some said there isn’t much more they can do to pressure Moore to step aside

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Republicans are examining options to block Roy Moore from the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that Republicans were examining options to prevent Roy Moore from becoming a U.S. senator. But some GOP senators acknowledged there isn’t much more they can do with Moore refusing to step aside. 

GOP lawmakers have called on Moore to withdraw his nomination in the special election for the seat vacated by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions following a bombshell Washington Post story. The Post reported that four women accused Moore of sexual advances while they were teenagers and he was in his thirties. Another woman said Monday that Moore sexually assaulted her when she was 16 years old. 

Cornyn Rescinds Moore Endorsement
Calls accusations disqualifying if true

Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, speaks with reporters outside of his office in the Capitol on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn rescinded his endorsement Monday of Alabama Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore.

“I believe the accusations against Roy Moore are disturbing and, if true, disqualifying,” the Texas Republican said in a statement. “The most appropriate course of action, in my view, is to leave the final judgment in the hands of Alabama voters — where it has always belonged — and withdraw my endorsement.”