Bernie Sanders

Cummings, CBC to Trump: Wrong!
Maryland Democrat has "no idea" why Trump said what he did

Cummings said he is not sure why Trump made up an anecdote about him at a press conference. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., says President Donald Trump is making things up when he said he backed out of a meeting with the president.

Trump, answering a question at his Thursday press conference about whether he would include the Congressional Black Caucus in his agenda for inner cities, went off on a tangent about how he was supposed to meet with Cummings but that the Maryland Democrat decided against it because of politics.

A New DNC Chair: This Time It Really Counts
Democrats have much to overcome

The choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz as Democratic National Committee chairman has taken on larger-than-usual significance, Walter Shapiro writes. (Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

BALTIMORE — Watching the Democratic Party’s regional forum here last week, my mind kept flashing back to that nearly century-old Will Rogers crack, “I am not a member of any organized party — I am a Democrat.”

In normal times, the selection of a Democratic chair is one of those topics that primarily interest political reporters in the postelection doldrums and consultants hoping for future contracts. But with the Democrats in their worst shape organizationally since the 1920s, the choice of a permanent successor to Debbie Wasserman Schultz takes on larger-than-usual significance.

A Case of the Mondays: Recent Senate Session Third-Longest Since 1915
Chamber didn't adjourn from noon Monday until Wednesday at 9:07 p.m.

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If this week felt a little long, that’s because it was. When the Senate gaveled out at 9:07 p.m. on Wednesday, it adjourned a session that began Monday at noon. That made it the third-longest legislative session in Senate history since 1915. In the world of arcane Senate procedure, that means the chamber never moved off the legislative business day of Monday, leaving Capitol Hill watchers with that tired, cranky feeling they never could quite shake.

The Senate debated for those 57 hours and 7 minutes several of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees, including the senators’ colleague Jeff Sessions of Alabama for attorney general, and the contentious Education secretary pick, Betsy DeVos, which ended with a history-making tiebreaking vote by Vice President Mike Pence.

Word on the Hill: The New City That Never Sleeps?
Twitter trolling

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and his colleagues seem to be working nonstop. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senators seem to never go home these days, and you can find people walking around the Capitol at all hours of the night.

Senate Carryout and the Refectory have opened earlier and remain open later than usual. Capitol Police and workers around the complex have had extended shifts.

Warren Blocked From Speaking During Sessions Confirmation Debate
Republicans say Massachusetts Democrat impugned AG nominee

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren was directed to not speak for the remainder of the debate on the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions to be attorney general. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:22 p.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and liberal firebrand Sen. Elizabeth Warren clashed on the chamber floor Tuesday evening, with the Kentucky Republican moving for the Massachusetts Democrat to take her seat.

Senators voted along party lines, 49-43, to uphold a ruling of the chair, blocking Warren from speaking for the remainder of the debate on confirmation of fellow Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general.

Trump Advisers’ Infrastructure Plan Has Big Risks
Could reward investors in projects

President Donald Trump's pick for U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross worked on Trump's proposal for infrastructure (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo).

An infrastructure plan put together by two advisers of President Donald Trump could carry potential risks, economists and transportation experts say.

The plan is based on a paper by Trump economic adviser Peter Navarro, who is director of the National Trade Council, and Wilbur Ross, Trump's pick for Commerce Secretary that was set before the election.

Ferguson Painting Removal is ‘Closed Matter’
A vote uphold the ruling that the controversial painting was a violation

The controversial painting by Missouri student David Pulphus that depicts police as animals probably won’t be going back up in the tunnel connecting the U.S. Capitol to the Cannon House Office building. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Office Building Commission has supported a decision by the Architect of the Capitol to take down a controversial painting that depicted police as animals.

The painting by student David Pulphus was inspired by the police shooting in Ferguson, Missouri. It was part of the annual Capitol high school art competition.

In Age of Trump, Chaos Reigns in the Senate
Tensions over basic procedures takes over chamber

Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, right, speaks with aides during a Senate Finance Committee meeting Tuesday to vote on Georgia Rep. Tom Price’s nomination to be HHS secretary and Steven Mnuchin’s to be Treasury secretary. Democrats boycotted the votes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate reached a new level of dysfunction Tuesday, and that was even before the debate on filling the Supreme Court began.

“You know, ‘advice and consent’ doesn’t mean ram the nominees through … These nominees are not what Donald Trump promised and not what represent middle-class American values,” Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer told reporters, adding that it wasn’t enough to just vote against President Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks.

Elizabeth Warren Emerges as GOP Boogeyman
Republicans are eager to tie vulnerable Democrats to Massachusetts liberal

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been invoked in early GOP attacks so far against vulnerable Democratic senators even though she isn’t likely to face a competitive re-election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Massachusetts poll making the rounds this week implied that Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren may be in trouble in 2018. But without a declared challenger, it’s hard to see much danger on the horizon for Warren in a blue state. 

The bigger question is not whether Warren is well-liked in her own state, but whether she’s disliked enough in other states to be a liability for Democrats facing re-election in places President Donald Trump won last year.