Barbara Comstock

DCCC Launches Digital Ads Over GOP Tax Vote
Seven Republicans who voted against the tax plan are also targeted

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock speaks with reporters as she leaves the Capitol after voting for the GOP’s tax plan Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Seizing on the House’s passage of the Republican tax plan Thursday, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is launching digital ads in more than 40 GOP-held districts, including against Republicans who voted against the plan.

The ads, provided first to Roll Call, will run on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The committee is also rolling out a website, TaxCutsandJobsAct.com, that allows voters to submit their own video testimonials about the tax plan. The site will be promoted in Google search ads.

Photos of the Week: Taxes Dominate, Bible Museum Opens and Trump Visits
The week of Nov. 13 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Virginia Rep. Scott Taylor sits on the House steps to shoot a selfie video about his vote on the tax overhaul Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Taxes once again dominated action on the Hill, with the Senate Finance Committee marking up its plan while the House passed its version of a tax overhaul by a 227-205 vote Thursday. 

Speier and Gillibrand Introduce Harassment Transparency Legislation
Bill would disclose involved offices and make members pay for settlements

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, right, and California Rep. Jackie Speier hold a news conference Wednesday to introduce legislation aimed at addressing and preventing sexual harassment for Capitol Hill staff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers joined Rep. Jackie Speier to introduce new legislation that takes aim at sexual harassment in Congress.

“For all intents and purposes, a staffer in the Capitol is powerless and gagged,” Speier, a California Democrat, said Wednesday at the beginning of a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center. Harassers are often allowed to walk away to prey on others, she said.

Anti-Harassment Training Mandated for House Members, Staffs
Paul Ryan makes announcement after two lawmakers recount incidents of sexual harassment

Speaker Paul D. Ryan says the House will adopt a policy of mandatory anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training for all members and their staffs. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House members and their staffs will now be required to take mandatory anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan made the announcement Tuesday afternoon, on the same day that Reps. Jackie Speier, a California Democrat, and Barbara Comstock, a Virginia Republican, recounted at a House Administration Committee hearing incidents of sexual harassment involving lawmakers.

Current Lawmakers Have Sexually Harassed Staffers, Speier Alleges
Comstock tells of lawmaker who greeted a former staffer wearing only a towel

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said Tuesday she knows of two current lawmakers who have sexually harassed congressional staff in the past.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two current lawmakers allegedly have sexually harassed congressional staff in the past. And a former staffer reportedly asked to deliver papers to a member’s home was greeted by him wearing only a towel.

That’s what California Democratic Rep. Jackie Speier and Republican Barbara Comstock of Virginia recounted during a hearing by the House Administration Committee on sexual harassment Tuesday.

At the Races: 362 Days to Go
Our weekly roundup of Roll Call’s top campaign stories and more

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We’re officially one year out from the 2018 midterms. (Hard to believe, right?) There are a lot of House and Senate races to watch, and you can keep track of them all with At the Races. Each week we’ll round up our top stories and bring you some new content, like the Reader’s Race (scroll down for more on that). Make sure to sign up *here* to receive the newsletter next Thursday. We want to hear from you! Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone and Bridget  

This week… Voters went to the polls, Martha McSally discussed her Senate run, three Republicans retired and Utah got a new congressman. Here’s what happened At the Races:

Democrats Say Election is Warning to GOP on Taxes
Citing Tuesday election results, minority party urges redirection

From left, House Ways and Means ranking member Richard Neal, D-Mass., Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., Senate Finance ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., hold a press conference on tax reform outside of the House Ways and Means hearing room in the Longworth House Office Building. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats were quick on Wednesday to use the results of Tuesday’s elections to pressure Republicans to drop their attempt to pass an overhaul of the U.S. tax code with support only from within the GOP.

The GOP lost two gubernatorial races in Virginia and New Jersey, and gained seats at the state and local level across the country. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer says those results signal a rebuke of the current Republican agenda, including taxes and health care.

5 Things Tuesday’s Results Tell Us About 2018
GOP losses could spell trouble for Virginia’s Barbara Comstock

Virginia Rep. Barbara Comstock is one of the most vulnerable incumbents up for re-election next year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tuesday’s victories in Virginia and New Jersey had Democratic strategists practically tripping over themselves to predict 2018 good fortunes.

Democrats won the governor’s mansion in both states by wide margins. They picked up at least 16 state legislative seats in Virginia. That included a transgender Democrat defeating a longtime conservative Republican state legislator who authored a so-called bathroom bill. And in Maine, voters supported a ballot measure to expand Medicaid.

Opinion: Democrats Go from the Window Ledge to Giddy
Caution advised in interpreting Va. gubernatorial election results

Virginia Gov.-elect Ralph Northam greets supporters at a Tuesday night election night rally in Fairfax, Virginia. Northam defeated Republican candidate Ed Gillespie. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

For those Democrats who still revere the memory of Franklin Roosevelt, Tuesday night was a time for many lusty choruses of his theme song, “Happy Days Are Here Again.”

In 48 hours, the Democrats have gone from the fetal crouch to giddy exuberance. New Jersey offered few surprises as former Goldman Sachs executive Phil Murphy bridged his Wall Street background to cruise to any easy victory over Chris Christie’s lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno.

Why Scott Taylor Is Worried About Trump
Republican congressman says Democrats’ strong showing in Virginia is referendum on administration

Reps. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., left to right, Scott Taylor, R-Va., and Bradley Byrne, R-Ala., leave a meeting of the House Republican Conference last month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Scott Taylor didn’t mince words when he said a wave of Democratic victories in Virginia were a “referendum” on the Trump administration and it could be because it spells trouble him next year.

Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam won the gubernatorial race and a number of Democratic challengers beat incumbent Republicans to win seats in the House of Delegates.