Arkansas

Johnny Cash is replacing one of the Capitol’s Civil War statues
The country music legend and civil rights leader Daisy Gatson Bates will replace controversial Civil War figures

A statue of Uriah Milton Rose of Arkansas is seen in the Capitol's Statuary Hall on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The times are changing, and so is the marble. Arkansas is leaving behind statues of the old guard and sending a few new faces to the U.S. Capitol.

Civil rights icon Daisy Gatson Bates and musician Johnny Cash will join the Statuary Hall collection in D.C., replacing 19th-century attorney Uriah Milton Rose and statesman James Paul Clarke. The governor of Arkansas, Asa Hutchinson, made the plan official by signing a bill last week. 

Senate staffers told ‘What not to do...’ Mar-a-Lago USB-edition
Staffers got an email after a Secret Security agent put the intruder’s flash drive in a computer, and it began installing files

Senate staffers were issued a cybersecurity warning Monday evening. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate staffers received an email Monday evening with the subject line “What not to do...” 

An image of the message, obtained by Roll Call, shows that a Senate IT Security listserve sent staffers a message pointing out some don’t-try-this-at-home (or work) cybersecurity behaviors. 

More Chinese fentanyl may stay out of the US under a new bipartisan bill
Another bipartisan proposal would help physicians learn more about a patient’s substance abuse history.

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., arrives in the Capitol for the weekly Senate luncheons on Tuesday, March 5, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Calls to address the opioid crisis resumed Thursday as lawmakers released a bill that aims to curb the flow of illegal opioids into the United States and another to help physicians learn more about a patient’s substance abuse history.

The separate actions by a bipartisan group of senators and another of House members are drawing fresh attention to the overdose crisis, which is a concern for both parties even though Congress cleared an opioids law just last year. One of the bills, a Senate measure, stands a good chance of becoming law, said co-sponsor Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

Chris Murphy says ‘double standard’ exists between physical and cybersecurity in the Senate
Connecticut Democrat pressed sergeant-at-arms on securing senators' personal devices

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., calls how the Senate handles cybersecurity a "double standard." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senators want to fix what they’re calling a “double standard” between how physical and cyber security are handled by the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms.

At a Legislative Branch Appropriations subcommittee hearing Wednesday, Sen. Christopher S. Murphy pressed Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger on threats to lawmakers and staff’s personal digital devices, including smartphones.

Legal challenges are threatening Trump administration changes to the ACA
HHS is facing an increasing number of challenges to its changes to the 2010 health care law

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies during a House Education and the Workforce Committee hearing on June 6, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)!

The Trump administration, which has already been defeated in a number of high-profile legal cases, is facing an increasing number of challenges to its changes to the 2010 health care law and women’s health issues.

Just last week, the Justice Department filed a brief arguing that the entire health care law should fall, a position that even some conservative legal scholars call risky. Two days later, on Wednesday, a federal judge struck down the administration’s rules requiring Medicaid recipients to report their work hours to keep their coverage. On Thursday, another judge blocked the administration’s expansion of association health plans, which let small businesses band together to buy insurance and do not have to meet all of the 2010 law’s requirements.

Judge blocks Trump’s rule to expand insurance plans that don’t meet ACA requirements
The rule, finalized last year, allows small businesses and the self-employed to band together to buy association health plans

Supporters hold up Save Medicaid signs during the Senate Democrats’ news conference at the Capitol with disability advocates to oppose the Republicans’ Graham-Cassidy health care bill on Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration suffered another blow to its health care agenda in federal court on Thursday when a district court judge said a rule to expand insurance plans that do not have to meet all of the requirements under the 2010 health care law is invalid.

U.S. District Judge John D. Bates blocked a rule that was finalized last year that allows small businesses and self-employed people to band together to purchase insurance known as association health plans.

‘No values?’ Democrats unlikely to advance a full budget, already facing GOP attacks
McCarthy riles Pelosi over oft-repeated remark that budgets are a ‘statement of values’

House Budget Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., says it’s unlikely Democrats will advance a full budget resolution this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are unlikely to advance a full budget resolution this year, opening the new majority to the same attacks it previously launched at Republicans for failing to get their budget resolutions to the floor.

But Democrats are expected to go a step further and not even mark up a budget resolution in committee this year. Republicans were quick to pounce, even though a final decision has not yet been made.

Senators want help securing the personal phones of members and staff
The proposal would allow the Sergeant-at-Arms to provide “voluntary cybersecurity assistance” to lawmakers, some staff

Senators Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Tom Cotton, R-Ark., want the the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms to help secure personal devices of members and staff against cyber threats. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two Senate Intelligence Committee members introduced a bill Wednesday to protect both personal electronic devices and Senate accounts of members and staff from cybersecurity vulnerabilities and threats. 

The proposal from Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Arkansas Republican Tom Cotton would allow the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms to provide “voluntary cybersecurity assistance” to lawmakers and certain Senate staff to secure accounts and personal devices.

The Federal Reserve chairman is in demand amid economic danger signs
The Fed chairman is stepping up the number of group meetings on his dance card, including with House Democrats

Powell has been making himself readily available to lawmakers. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It must be nice to get your own personal report on the economy from the head of the world’s largest central bank.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell met with roughly 70 House Republicans at the whip team meeting prior to Monday night votes, where, among other things, he talked about the Fed recently lowering its economic growth projections for 2019 and 2020.

Mueller and Barr just did Democrats a gigantic favor
Zealous congressional Dems were in danger of overreaching. Now they’ve been dealt a reality check

Democrats can thank Attorney General William Barr for saving them from themselves, Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — There’s a slippery slope in Washington between oversight and overreach. It’s a path that’s been worn so smooth by politicians in D.C., you could practically pour water on it and charge admission for rides in the summer. Given a yellow light by voters in any given election to proceed cautiously, the winning party will almost always hit the gas to get where they want to go faster and farther than voters ever wanted to go in the first place.

As we learned in the 2018 midterms, voters want congressional oversight of the Trump White House. In fact, they demanded it. Nobody thinks a president should be allowed to run the government alone or without the other two branches of government checking his work.