appeals court

Federal court orders reinstatement of fired Capitol Police officer

A federal court has ordered the Capitol Police to comply with an arbitration decision to reinstate an officer terminated for misconduct. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A federal court has ordered the Capitol Police to comply with an arbitration decision to reinstate an officer fired for misconduct, supporting an earlier ruling made by the Office of Congressional Workplace Rights.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued a judgement Friday in a case that’s been underway for more than five years. The officer in question, Private First Class Andrew Ricken, was fired in June 2013. The court rejected a petition from Capitol Police to review a decision by the OCWR (previously the Office of Compliance) that upheld an arbitration decision that would allow him to return to work.

Trump’s Stamp on Judiciary Starting: It Could Be Much Faster
With no filibuster and a GOP Senate, he’s got a big opening to reshape appeals courts

The four appellate nominees moving through the Senate this week include, from left, Amy Coney Barrett, Joan Larsen, Allison H. Eid and Stephanos Bibas. Barrett and Larsen have already been confirmed. (Courtesy Screenshot/C-SPAN, Joan Larsen/Facebook, University of Pennsylvania Law School)

While White House officials are subsumed by the fresh intensity of the special counsel investigation, and House Republicans are preoccupied with propping up the tax overhaul, their GOP colleagues in the Senate are focusing on something not nearly as provocative as either of those things — but perhaps almost as consequential over the long haul.

This week, they’re pushing to double, from four to eight, the number of reliable conservatives that President Donald Trump has installed on the federal appeals courts during the opening year of his administration.