Andy Harris

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing Over Recess
Franken cut from Letterman special, star sighting, and supporting the home team

Gonna Fly Now: Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md., runs up the House steps at the Capitol for the vote on tax reform on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. And some of the best ones are those that we come across while reporting the big ones.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Ryan to Factory Worker: ‘We’re Going to Lower Your Taxes Yourself’

When Speaker Paul D. Ryan toured a manufacturing plant Thursday to promote the Republican Party’s still developing tax plan, a question from a factory worker reflected what some in the GOP are worried about — that when it comes to taxes, most people are worried about their own bottom line. Watch for Ryan’s full reply, and his messaging on the business benefits of the potential tax overhaul. He was joined by Rep. Andy Harris.

GOP Tax Messaging Heavy on Business Benefits
‘It all leads to the same end,’ speaker said of trickle-down effect of tax legislation

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Rep. Andy Harris speak to employees at Dixon Valve & Coupling Company about the GOP’s still developing tax legislation. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

CHESTERTOWN, Md. – “Cutting taxes is great for the businesses to make businesses more money. But how is that going to lower my taxes, or make sure it comes down to me?” That was the question a 20-year-old Dixon Valve & Coupling employee posed to Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Thursday.

Visiting the company’s headquarters to promote the GOP’s still developing tax legislation, Ryan told the employee that he plans to lower taxes on individuals so they take home more of their paychecks. Then he quickly pivoted back to his primary message.

Congress Likely to Defer to Firearms Bureau on Bump Stock Ban
'There’s a big regulatory question,' Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., speaks at a news conference in Maryland on Thursday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

CHESTERTOWN, Md. — Don’t expect Congress to take a quick vote banning bump stocks, the device that allowed the Las Vegas gunman to shoot his semi-automatic rifles at a rate resembling the rapid fire of a fully automatic weapon.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday at a press conference here that he and many other lawmakers are just learning of the existence of bump stocks.  Congress first needs to examine how they are even allowed under current law, the Wisconsin Republican said, suggesting that a regulatory fix may be preferred over congressional action.

D.C. Law Banning Wet Wipes Could Clog Appropriations
Fatbergs: An amalgamation of sewer waste made worse by pre-moistened wipes

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, seen here in 2016, joined other D.C. politicians at a news conference on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By KELLIE MEJDRICH and DOUG SWORD

District of Columbia leaders on Monday warned Congress to stay out of local issues and keep policy riders aimed at D.C. laws away from spending bills, a battle the District fights annually.

In Tax Return Secrecy, Congress Unites
What some lawmakers said when we asked for copies of their returns

Only 37 of 532 members of Congress responded when Roll Call asked for copies of their tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

No matter what their political affiliation, members of Congress have this in common: They don’t like releasing their tax returns. Only 37 of the 532 members of the House and Senate responded when Roll Call asked for copies of their tax returns over several weeks, starting in April. Most of them declined to release their tax returns.

Here are some of their responses.

GOP Moderates Face Health Care Heat
‘Many of our members who were opposed to the bill are probably still opposed’

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., leaves a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on April 26, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON, CQ ROLL CALL

Conservative Republicans put their moderate colleagues in the health care hot seat Wednesday.

Conservatives Begin to Accept Health Care Bill, Moderate Votes Unclear
‘Whether it’s this vehicle or another vehicle, it will be addressed.’

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., arrives for a hastily called House Republican caucus meeting after Speaker Ryan canceled the vote on the American Health Care Act of 2017 on Friday, March 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By LINDSEY McPHERSON and ERIN MERSHON

UPDATED 1:50 p.m. 04/26/17

GOP: No ‘Artificial Deadline’ on Health Care Vote
House Republicans giving repeal and replace another chance

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan did not give a firm timeline of when the chamber would vote on the latest iteration of a repeal and replace health care law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Sooner rather than later” — that’s the prevailing sentiment among House Republicans as to when their chamber should vote on a bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law if tweaks being discussed will move enough “no” votes to “yes.”

Talk of the House working through the Easter recess to get the bill done is overblown, members said, but they noted that if an agreement can be reached quickly, there remains a possibility the scheduled Thursday afternoon start of the two-week recess could get pushed back to accommodate a vote later this week.

Some GOP Lawmakers Push Back Against EPA Cuts
Decimating environmental agency could hurt — even in Trump country

President Donald Trump’s recent budget blueprint proposes eliminating roughly 3,200 positions at the EPA along with 50 programs. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

As President Donald Trump introduces a series of budget cuts and regulatory rollbacks that would cripple the Environmental Protection Agency, he faces one unpredictable obstacle: resistance from fellow Republicans.

A small but vocal number of GOP lawmakers have rallied in support of popular programs in their districts, including clean water programs in the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay, that are among the biggest losers in the budget Trump proposed to Congress last month.