American Indians

Word on the Hill: Your D.C. Fourth of July Schedule
Concert, Metro and parking logistics

Prepare for the fireworks on the mall this year. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

So you can plan ahead for this weekend, here is what’s going on in D.C. on the Fourth of July along with some logistical information.

Read HOH’s full Independence Day package, which includes a list of different things to do in the D.C. area, what members do for the holiday and what senators usually do.

Natives on the Hill Aims to Be an Antidote to Homesickness
Three staffers launch new group for fellow Native Americans

Natives on the Hill co-founders, from left, Renée Gasper, Catelin Aiwohi and Kim Moxley. (Courtesy Sen. Tom Udall’s office)

A new staff association hopes to help Native Americans feel at home in D.C.

“A lot of us are away from home, and so there’s a community element to it. It’s harder to feel Indian sometimes in D.C. because you’re disconnected from ceremonies, cultural events,” said Kim Moxley, co-founder of Natives on the Hill. “It’s like a ‘battling homesickness’ mechanism.”

Can Quist Chart Path for Other Democrats to Follow?
While national Democrats focus on Trump and Russia, Montana House candidate talks health care

Democratic U.S. House candidate Rob Quist talks with supporters during a Get Out The Vote Canvass Launch event in Great Falls, Mont., on Monday. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

While national Democrats compile lists of President Donald Trump’s controversial statements, firings, and ties to Russia as ammunition for upcoming campaigns, Democrat Rob Quist is taking a different approach.

Though Quist’s Republican opponent for Montana’s at-large seat in Congress, businessman Greg Gianforte, is favored to win the special election Thursday, Quist has gained ground recently. Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales changed the race from a Likely Republican rating to Tilts Republican on Monday. His campaign announced Tuesday that he's raised more than $6 million, which has been crucial in the final days of the race.

Word on the Hill: National Wine Day
Dusty Baker on the Hill and Dana Rohrabacher in a sling

Celebrate National Wine Day before the weekend. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

You may be pleasantly surprised to hear about a very special, perhaps unknown, holiday. Today is National Wine Day.

It’s nearly Friday, which means it’s almost recess, so pick up a bottle of wine on your way home from work to celebrate.

New Mexican Would Be First Native American Congresswoman
Former state party chairwoman running for Lujan Grisham’s seat

Debra Haaland is the latest Democrat to seek the open 1st District seat, which New Mexico Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is vacating for a gubernatorial run. (Courtesy Democratic Party of New Mexico)

Former New Mexico Democratic Party Chairwoman Debra Haaland announced Tuesday she’s running for the state’s open 1st District seat. If elected, she would be the first Native-American congresswoman.

Haaland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo tribe and a former San Felipe Pueblo tribal administrator, the Albuquerque Journal reported. She ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor in 2014.

Supreme Court to Explore Power of Congress to Affect Lawsuits
Separation of powers between branches is at issue

Chief Justice John Roberts has previously been skeptical of allowing Congress to weigh in on dismissing lawsuits with legislation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide a case that could reshape Congress’ power to use legislation to affect the outcome of specific ongoing court cases — in this instance, a 2014 law about a Michigan land tract and its use as a Native American casino.

The move puts the justices back into a long chain of litigation and legislation about whether the Interior Department could take that tract into trust for the Gun Lake Tribe of Pottawatomi Indians to pave the way for gaming operations — and whether a nearby resident can sue to stop it.

Opinion: Extreme Executive Orders — A Reckless Assault on Life-Saving Protections
President targeting immigrant communities

President Donald Trump has used executive orders to target immigrant communities, Brent Wilkes and Trip Van Noppen write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In January, President Donald Trump took an oath to “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution” and assumed the awesome responsibilities of that office. Presidents are charged with the responsibility to protect all Americans, but unfortunately, he has yet to do so.

He has particularly targeted immigrant communities with executive orders that tear families apart. Most recently, Trump has engaged in a new campaign with executive orders that attack our access to clean air and water while denying climate change.

Schilling Endorses ‘My Choice’ for Senate, and it Isn’t Him
Comes after he had considered running against Elizabeth Warren

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling had said he was considering a run against Elizabeth Warren for her Massachusetts Senate seat. (Cindy Ord/Getty Images file photo)

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling is looking less likely to run for Senate in Massachusetts against Elizabeth Warren after saying he backs another candidate.

Schilling had previously indicated he would run if his wife Shonda approved.

Supreme Court Nominee’s Legal Approach Follows Scalia
Analysis of past rulings reveal an ideology similar to late justice’s

Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, left, and Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley arrive to speak to reporters following their meeting in the Capitol on Feb. 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judge Neil Gorsuch included a line in his first remarks as a Supreme Court nominee that signals just how closely his approach to deciding cases aligns with the late Antonin Scalia, the polarizing and reliably conservative justice whose seat Gorsuch would fill.

“A judge who likes every outcome he reaches is very likely a bad judge, stretching for results he prefers rather than those the law demands,” Gorsuch, 49, said at the White House last Tuesday.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers an Unfair Target
Trump administration may review policies on tribal rights

Native American activists celebrate Dec. 4 after learning that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement to the Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation, ending a months-long standoff. (Scott Olson/Getty Images file photo)

Several high-profile events in 2016 involving Native American tribes and private developers highlighted the confusing and sometimes conflicting processes for federal environmental permitting.

As a former commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Portland District, which often consults with tribes for projects impacting Native American tribal rights, I was dismayed to see commentators and even some elected officials unfairly target the Corps of Engineers with vitriolic and often tremendously unfair criticism.