American Indians

Jayapal Joins Pocan As Co-Chair of Congressional Progressive Caucus
Ro Khanna replaces Jayapal as the caucus’s first vice chair

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., will co-chair the Congressional Progressive Caucus with Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Washington Rep. Pramila Jayapal and Wisconsin Rep. Mark Pocan will serve as co-chairs of the Congressional Progressive Caucus for the 116th Congress.

The CPC — which will have more than 90 members next year — held its leadership elections Thursday, which also saw California Rep. Ro Khanna chosen to replace Jayapal as first vice chair. 

Women Elected at Historic Levels, But No Surprise Here: White Men Dominate 116th Congress
Number of veterans down

A record number of women will be heading to Congress and there will be more minority lawmakers, but white men will still make up most of Congress. Above, supporters celebrate Jennifer Wexton's victory in Virginia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The 116th Congress is on track to be one of the most diverse in history, but the legislature will still be overwhelmingly white and male compared to the overall U.S. population. Historic numbers of women won seats in the midterm contests, but the number of veterans is likely to fall or stay flat. 

At least 96 women running for the House have won their races, shattering the previous record of 84 women in the House. Eighty-three of the women who won were Democrats.

Here’s All the House Republicans That Voters Sent Home
Incumbent losses cut across all factions of the Republican Caucus but most are moderates

Florida Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo, pictured at Greenglade Elementary School polling place on Election Day in Kendale, Florida, is one of at least 19 House Republicans to have lost re-election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated on November 13 at 11:41 p.m. | Voters have sent 23 House Republican incumbents and counting home, as the predicted Democratic wave materialized in the lower chamber’s midterm contests. 

The losses cut across all factions of the Republican Conference but most of the incumbents going home after this term are moderate members. With the number of House Republicans shrinking next year, conservatives are poised to become a larger portion of the conference. 

Why 2018 Is the New ‘Year of the Woman’
Number of incoming female freshmen lawmakers will exceed 1992 total

Hotel workers finish hanging a Jennifer Wexton campaign sign on stage for the Virginia Democrat’s election night party in Dulles, Va. on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic women picked up more than two dozen House seats Tuesday, helping to power both the party’s takeover of the chamber and an election widely considered a watermark in the political representation of women.

They shattered the previous record of 24 women elected during the 1992 “Year of the Woman,” following the previous year’s confirmation fight over Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, who faced sexual harassment allegations from Anita Hill.

Meet the History-Makers of the 116th Congress
In a banner year for candidate diversity, election night witnesses a few firsts

Ayanna Pressley is the first African-American elected to the House from Massachusetts. (Scott Eisen/Getty Images file photo)

Updated Sunday, 3:18 p.m. | Diversity has been a hallmark of the 2018 midterm elections, which have seen a record number of women, minorities and first-time candidates running for office. 

Here are some of the history-makers from election night. 

The 10 Most Vulnerable House Incumbents on Election Day
Iowa’s Rod Blum gives up the top spot but remains vulnerable

Pennsylvania Rep. Keith Rothfus claims the top spot in Roll Call’s final list of the most vulnerable incumbents of the 2018 cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Heading into Election Day, Republicans once again occupy all 10 spots of Roll Call’s list of most vulnerable House incumbents, but for the first time this cycle, Iowa Rep. Rod Blum is not leading the pack.

While President Donald Trump won Blum’s 1st District in 2016, operatives from both parties have consistently identified the two-term congressman as the incumbent most likely to lose this cycle — until the past month.

Will Elizabeth Warren Serve Out Her Term? She Wont Say
Another noncommittal answer from the senator fuels 2020 speculation

Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks in May. She has dodged questions about serving out her term. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren would not commit to serving out her full six-year term during a debate Tuesday night, further fanning speculation of a 2020 presidential run. 

The Massachusetts Democrat dodged the question, saying, “I guarantee this: No matter what I do, I will work for the people of the commonwealth of Massachusetts,” according to The Republican. 

Sinema Hews to the Middle in a Changing Arizona. Will It Be Enough to Win?
Democrat has positioned herself as moderate with bipartisan appeal in Senate race

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, the Democratic nominee for Senate in Arizona, speaks to supporters at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 570 in Tucson on Sunday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

TUCSON, Ariz. — Kyrsten Sinema is trying to do something that no Arizona Democrat has done in 30 years: win a Senate election.

“We know we can win this election,” the three-term congresswoman told supporters packed into a union hall here Sunday. “This year, the votes in the Senate matter.”

Trump, ‘Beautiful Ted’ Cruz Unite in Texas to Save Senate Seat
“Ted is leading the charge in Congress for more tax cuts,” president says

Donald Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas at a rally in Washington in September 2015 when the two were competing for the Republican presidential nomination. Three years later, President Trump campaigned for his former rival in Houston on Monday night. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As President Donald Trump and Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz shared a stage Monday evening in Houston, the former bitter rivals proved that one should never say never in politics.

“We had our little difficulties,” Trump told rallygoers at the Toyota Center, before calling Cruz now a “good friend.”

Markwayne Mullin Says He’ll Fight Avenatti
Oklahoma congressman responds to Trump antagonist’s challenge to Donald Trump Jr.

Rep. Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., said he’s ready to climb into the cage with lawyer Michael Avenatti after he challenged Donald Trump Jr. to a mixed martial arts fight. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Rep. Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma, a former professional mixed martial arts fighter, challenged Democratic lawyer Michael Avenatti to “meet him on the mat.”

Avenatti and Donald Trump Jr. have sparred on Twitter in recent weeks over special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia investigation and Avenatti’s rumored presidential ambitions. The rivalry took a surreal turn last week, when Avenatti challenged Trump Jr. to a “three-round mixed martial arts fight” with the proceeds going to charity.