2018 midterms

Analysis: Tough Road Ahead for Ryan in 2018
Will he want to stay in Congress after navigating immigration, budget and midterm challenges?

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., pictured arriving at the Capitol for a meeting to kick off 2018 spending negotiations, has a tough road ahead this year that could make him question his future in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he’s not going anywhere anytime soon, but he has a tough road ahead in 2018 that could test his patience with his conference, their Senate counterparts, the president and Washington. 

The Wisconsin Republican is known for keeping his cool under pressure. Thus far in his still young speakership, he’s managed to diffuse disagreements within the House Republican Conference before they’ve reached a boiling point. He also claimed a significant victory last year with passage of the landmark tax overhaul bill, a long-held priority for the former Budget and tax-writing chairman.   

At the Races: 362 Days to Go
Our weekly roundup of Roll Call’s top campaign stories and more

Republican senators started to abandon Alabama Senate GOP nominee Roy Moore after the Washington Post published allegations of a sexual encounter with a minor. Moore visited the Capitol on Oct. 31. Read the Roll Call story. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re officially one year out from the 2018 midterms. (Hard to believe, right?) There are a lot of House and Senate races to watch, and you can keep track of them all with At the Races. Each week we’ll round up our top stories and bring you some new content, like the Reader’s Race (scroll down for more on that). Make sure to sign up *here* to receive the newsletter next Thursday. We want to hear from you! Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone and Bridget  

This week… Voters went to the polls, Martha McSally discussed her Senate run, three Republicans retired and Utah got a new congressman. Here’s what happened At the Races:

Podcast: What Tuesday's Elections Signal for the 2018 Congressional Map
The Big Story, Episode 79

Virginia Gov.-elect Ralph Northam greets supporters at an election night rally November 7, 2017 in Fairfax, Virginia. Northam defeated Republican candidate Ed Gillespie. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

While the Democratic surge in the off-year voting gives the party reason to smile, the midterm election is a long way off. Roll Call reporters Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman detail what the results in Virginia, New Jersey and elsewhere mean for the Democrats' quest to take back the House. 

 

Flake Gives Anti-Trump Speech on Senate Floor
 

Podcast: Primary Elections and Steve Bannon’s Role
The Big Story, Episode 75

Former Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., poses with former White House strategist Steve Bannon on Wednesday in Washington. (Michael Caputo via Twitter)

Roll Call political reporters Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman explain how the primaries are shaping up ahead of the 2018 midterm elections amid a Republican Party civil war.

 

14 Ratings Shift Favor Toward Democrats in 2018
 

More 2018 Candidate Videos Worth Watching
 

Congressional candidate Amy McGrath made headlines recently with an introductory video that went viral. Watch highlights of McGrath’s video, as well as five other candidates who have announced they’re running in 2018 and are making waves across the country.

California GOP Incumbents Will Make Democrats’ Challenge Expensive
Democrats hope to flip nine of 14 Republican-held seats in 2018

Rep. Ed Royce is one of several California GOP incumbents gearing up for expensive re-election fights. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

National Democrats hope disapproval of President Donald Trump will help flip nine of California’s 14 Republican-held congressional seats, but campaign finance reports show Republican incumbents will make it expensive for them.

Six of them raised at least $750,000 during the first half of 2017, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. While Democratic challengers have raised less so far, they’ll get help from the party and outside groups past the primaries.