2018 Budget

Podcast: Lifting the Spending Caps
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 31

House Budget Committee Chairwoman Diane Black, R-Tenn., and Ranking Member John Yarmuth, D-Ky., listen to testimony by OMB Director Mick Mulvaney during a committee hearing on May 24, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle would like to lift the spending limits established by law, says CQ budget reporter Jennifer Shutt, adding that it's just the latest budget issue to confront lawmakers along with passing a budget resolution and a tax overhaul.

 

Podcast: Fiscal Deadlines Loom for Congress
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 29

Congress has barely a month to pass a spending bill to avoid a government shutdown, even as President Trump pushes for border wall funding and pressure builds to approve an aid package for Hurricane Harvey. But as CQ’s Ryan McCrimmon explains, a shutdown is probably still unlikely.

Analysis: Chances for Budget Through Regular Order Shaky
Shell budget may be needed to set up reconciliation process for tax overhaul

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has few viable paths to passing a budget resolution needed to set up the reconciliation process for a tax overhaul. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans are readying for a possible floor vote on a fiscal 2018 budget resolution as soon as next week, but with support for the plan currently shy of the 218 votes needed, action could be delayed weeks or even months.

After more than a month of negotiations, the House Budget Committee will mark up the fiscal blueprint on Wednesday. Floor action before the August recess appears to be the goal, and with several conservatives and moderates withholding support, that’s a target leaders will likely miss.

Podcast: Short Recess, Long on Goals
The Big Story, Episode 62

The Senate will stick around Washington a little longer in August, shortening its recess to focus on an ambitious agenda. The list of things to do could include confirming the new FBI director. CQ Roll Call Senior Senate Reporter Niels Lesniewski and Leadership Editor Jason Dick break down what is doable.

Budget Battle Opening Salvo Still Stalled
House GOP not focused on endgame as much as negotiating marker

House Budget Chairwoman Diane Black is moving forward with a budget resolution that does not reflect what can be agreed to in the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans have spent a month arguing over key pieces of a budget resolution that faces little chance of passage in the Senate. But they are focused less on the endgame than staking out their own position.

House members frequently view legislation they have passed as a marker for their position heading into bicameral negotiations.

Podcast: House Republicans Ignore Trump on Budget
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 23

Eric Ueland, Republican Staff Director for the Senate Budget Committee, hands out copies of President Trump's FY2018 Budget in Dirksen Building on May 23, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Even as a budget agreement remains elusive for Congress, House lawmakers have reached a couple of decisions: a significant funding boost for defense and around $511 billion for all else—largely ignoring President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget request, say’s CQ’s Budget Tracker editor David Lerman.

Show Notes:

Podcast: Lawmakers Could Seek Another Funding Shortcut
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 20

Lawmakers return to the Hill this week with a slew of committee hearings on the fiscal 2018 spending bills, say CQ budget reporters Ryan McCrimmon and Jennifer Shutt. There’s just one problem: lawmakers will be working without knowing how much they can spend.

Fuzzy Math in Trump Budget Obscures Size of Medicaid Cuts
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 19

Eric Ueland, Republican Staff Director for the Senate Budget Committee, hands out copies of President Donald Trump's fiscal 2018 Budget in the Dirksen Building on May 23, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration’s first full budget request has left some lawmakers scratching their head, says CQ Budget Tracker editor David Lerman, over the math: It doesn’t add up.

 

Opinion: Congress Needs to Raise Budget Caps
Economic and national security investments vital to our long-term success

Not raising the budget caps risks shortchanging the next generation by leaving behind an ill-prepared workforce, a crumbling infrastructure, and a stagnant economy, Kentucky Rep. John Yarmuth writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We begin the 2018 budget process facing arbitrary and irresponsible spending caps that threaten our security, our economy, and our nation’s standing as a global leader of research and innovation. Yet, the budget proposal put forth by President Donald Trump does not respond to this simple truth. In fact, it will take our country in the opposite direction.

The president would provide additional funds for one important aspect of government — defense — but would do so at the expense of all other investments. That’s not a responsible proposal — and it should not be treated as one. Even some of my Republican colleagues have criticized these misguided priorities of President Trump. House Budget Committee member Tom Cole, R-Okla., called the president’s proposed cuts “short-sighted,” saying, “These are investments the country ought to be making.”