116th Congress

Baseballs, Yoda, guitars and more: Here's what's in Doug Jones' office

A baseball signed by President Barack Obama is just one of the many baseballs displayed in Sen. Doug Jones's office. (Hope Howard/CQ Roll Call)

These members can play baseball, but do you want them on your trivia team?
Heard on the Hill

Virginia Rep. Denver Riggleman rolls over on his head as he field a ground ball during the 58th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

As the lights came up at the 58th annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity, members of the Democratic and Republican teams took the field. Despite both teams’ months of practice, didn’t any of them think they’d need to brush up on their trivia?

Roy argues for wall funding

Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, speaks during a press conference on the situation at the southern border in Washington on Tuesday June 18, 2019. Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call

Congressman TJ Cox talks Filipino food, heritage and why he decided to run
At the Table

Rep. T.J. Cox, D-Calif. discusses his Filipino heritage and why he decided to run at Kaliwa, a restaurant in D.C.'s Wharf area. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

As Asian Pacific American Heritage Month comes to a close, we sat down with Rep. TJ Cox and a helping of assorted Filipino dishes at Kaliwa, a restaurant in D.C's Wharf area.

Rants aside, Trump scores big with Congress
Podcast, Episode 141

Trump in the House during his State of the Union address on Feb. 5, 2019. Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Capitol Ink | Punxsutawney Don

‘That’s why I’m the majority leader and you’re the minority whip’
Hoyer, Scalise trade barbs in first House floor colloquy together

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., replaces Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., in the 116th Congress as the No. 2 Republican leader who gets to participate in weekly floor colloquies with the No. 2 Democratic leader, Steny H. Hoyer. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“That’s why I’m the majority leader and you’re the minority whip,” House Democratic leader Steny H. Hoyer said to Republican whip Steve Scalise on the House floor Friday, just one of the ways Hoyer welcomed his new floor sparring partner to the fray. 

The comment was the most pointed and somewhat personal but far from the only political insult the No. 2 party leaders traded during their first colloquy together. 

House Democrats to hold listening sessions to plan agenda for mid-February retreat
Location for annual caucus retreat still being finalized but dates set for Feb. 13-15

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., said the caucus will soon start holding listening sessions to plan an agenda for its annual retreat in mid-February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats will soon start holding listening sessions to plan the agenda for their annual caucus retreat next month, their first in the majority since 2010, Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries told Roll Call. 

Jeffries of New York and Caucus Vice Chairwoman Katherine Clark of Massachusetts both said the retreat is scheduled for Feb. 13-15 but they have yet to finalize the location. 

Trailblazers and absences define start of new Congress
Plenty of firsts, as well as some notable empty seats

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is sworn in Thursday, surrounded by children in the rostrum of the House chamber on the first day of the 116th Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The first day of a new Congress is filled with ceremony and tradition, but there were a few things that set the start of the 116th Congress apart.

For the first time in history, a new congressional session began in the midst of a partial government shutdown. The swearing-in ceremonies and celebrations were clouded by the ongoing shutdown that’s now entered a second week. About a quarter of federal discretionary spending has run out, resulting in the shuttering of agencies and federal programs. But with the legislative branch already funded, there weren’t logistical problems on Capitol Hill that would devastate a high-profile day like the opening of a new Congress.

Pelosi elected speaker with 15 Democratic defections
California Democrat claims gavel again after eight years in minority

Nancy Pelosi is speaker again, eight years after she last held the gavel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats, in their first act of the 116th Congress on Thursday, officially elected Nancy Pelosi to serve as speaker, returning the gavel to the longtime Democratic leader eight years after she last held it.

The speaker election was not without controversy, however. The California Democrat had to cut a handful of deals over the past two months with would-be opponents to shore up the support needed to win the floor vote, even though no one was challenging her for the post.