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Hundreds of Thousands of Marchers Flood the National Mall
Women’s March participants in Washington, D.C. exceed predictions

Protesters march up 14th Street past the Washington Monument holding signs during the Women's March on Washington on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A District of Columbia official estimated a crowd size of more than half a million people for the Women's March on Washington on Saturday, according to the Associated Press. The march, organized to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump that took place Friday at the Capitol, was originally expected to garner a crowd of 100,000 to 200,000, according to media reports.

Images of long lines at Metro stations filled social media for several hours leading up to the original 1 p.m. ET march start time (though formal speakers and events began at 10 a.m.).

Attempts to Find Bipartisan Mood Challenged at Start
Despite hope among both parties, partisanship rears ugly head

President Donald J. Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s inauguration ushered in hopes from both sides of the aisle for some bipartisan comity. But shortly after Trump departed the Capitol Friday, those feelings ran headfirst into the partisan scars of the previous Congress.

Some Democrats see the GOP reaping the rewards of what they call a strategy of obstruction in the last Congress, and it might be difficult for them to heed calls for bipartisanship, even if it’s something they might believe needs to happen. 

One Last Photo of Obama and Biden (and Pence), by Leahy
Avid photographer, senator was on both jobs on Friday

Former Vice President Joe Biden, Former President Barack Obama and Vice President Mike Pence. (Sen. Patrick J. Leahy)

Statuary Lunch Hall a Model of Make-Nice Decorum
After fiery campaign and inaugural speech

A U.S. Capitol Police officer takes a photo as a Marine helicopter carrying former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama lifts off from the East Plaza of the U.S. Capitol following the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After former President Barack Obama took off on a military chopper from the East Front of the Capitol, President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence joined congressional leaders and other dignitaries for one of Inauguration Day’s more intimate moments, far from the crowds.

At the traditional luncheon in Statuary Hall honoring the new president, attendees at the event — one of the hottest tickets in town — feasted on lobster and steak, with pairings of California wines.

Chaffetz Trolls Clinton on Inauguration Day
‘So pleased she's not the president’

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, shakes hands with Hillary Clinton at Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Fox News/Rep. Jason Chaffetz/Instagram).

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, got one last dig at Hillary Clinton during the inauguration of President Donald Trump on Friday.

Chaffetz posted a photo of a screen shot from Fox News of him shaking the former secretary of State’s hand. While on the surface it may look magnanimous, the caption that the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee put was not as gracious:

At Trump Inauguration, Even the Rain Strikes Partisan Notes
Members of Congress see different signs at inaugural ceremony

President Donald Trump addresses the crowd after being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States on the West Front of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Kellyanne Conway’s ‘Revolutionary’ Fashion Fail
Her $3,600 Gucci coat inspired Twitter mockery Friday

Kellyanne Conway is seen here talking to former Vice President Dan Quayle and making a... statement. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Friday’s inaugural ceremonies featured the traditional sea of patriotically hued ties, more than one all-white pants suit and the new first lady’s elegant Ralph Lauren ensemble, which was admired by both sides of the political Twitterati.

And then there was Kellyanne Conway.

Lewandowski Stopped From Joining Trump at Inauguration
Ex-aide identifies himself as ‘Mr. Trump’s campaign manager’ when stopped by police

Corey Lewandowski on the phone outside the Capitol Crypt after he was denied entry by police. (Alex Gangitano/ CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski was stopped from joining the party on the inauguration platform on Friday because he didn’t have the right pass.

Minutes before President Barack Obama and Trump made their way through the Capitol Crypt, Lewandowski was stopped by Capitol Police as he tried to make his way through.

A Look Inside the Capitol: Lawmakers Prep for Inauguration Ceremony
Lawmakers were prepping for the rain and hoping for unity

California Rep. Doug LaMalfa arrives for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As New York Republican Rep. Peter King gaveled in the House chamber at 10 a.m. for a quick pro forma session, there was an abnormal crowd of members in the chamber for what is typically a boring procedural necessity.

But on this Friday, a few hundred members gathered in the back of the chamber and lined up by class for their turn to exit the Capitol building and take their places on an erected platform to witness the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States.

Protesters Greet Inauguration Guests, Clash With Police in Streets
People swarm Metro stations, event entrances and damage property in protest against Trump

Firefighters quickly extinguished a fire near 13th and Massachusetts Ave. Friday morning before Donald Trump was sworn in. (Matt Rhodes for CQ Roll Call)

Pockets of protests erupted throughout Washington, DC, Friday, at times threatening to overshadow the pomp of Donald Trump's inauguration and presenting a reminder of the stark divisions facing the 45th president.

Demonstrators arrived early, touting concern for issues including immigration, border control, labor and racism. Some attempted -- unsuccessfully -- to block the crowds that filed into the Capitol grounds before Trump was sworn in. In what appeared to be isolated outbursts of violence, other groups set small fires throughout the city, broke windows and clashed with police in the Franklin Square area.