ENVI

Paying respects to Elijah Cummings at the Capitol? Here’s what you need to know
Crowds expected to honor the late Democratic congressman from Baltimore

A memorial for the late House Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The public can pay its respects on Thursday, Oct. 24, as Maryland Rep. Elijah E. Cummings lies in state in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall between 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Public viewing will follow a private ceremony at 11 a.m.

Visitors must enter through the Capitol Visitor Center on the East Front of the Capitol. Attendees can start lining up Thursday morning on First Street Northwest and Southwest, between Constitution and Independence avenues, or on Second Street Northeast and Southeast, between East Capitol Street and Independence Avenue Southeast.

Democrats may come to regret choosing impeachment over independents
Base voters may be happy, but they won’t be the ones deciding the 2020 election

The Democrats’ impeachment push may please the base, but it could cost them with independents in 2020, Winston writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Put yourself, for a moment, in the shoes of average independent American voters in fly-over country where next year’s election is likely to be decided. Many, if not most, are probably feeling trapped by what amounts to a constant barrage of white noise coming out of Washington these days.

Ukraine. Doral. Impeachment. Syria. Schiff and Pelosi. Hunter and Joe. Trump and Trump. Impeachment. Secret hearings and secret Russian “assets.” Impeachment.

Zuckerberg to face criticism over cryptocurrency, other issues
Democrats and Republicans will interrogate the Facebook CEO on Wednesday over a number of issues

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is expected to face bipartisan criticism Wednesday when he appears before the House Financial Services Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A conciliatory-sounding Mark Zuckerberg will face questions Wednesday about Facebook’s world-altering ambitions from congressional critics of both parties.

Democrats and Republicans are expected to interrogate the Facebook CEO over the plan to launch Libra, a cryptocurrency pegged to a basket of global currencies and managed by a consortium of multinational corporations, as well as the company’s role in the spread of political propaganda, alleged violations of housing legislation, dominance of online advertising, monetization of users’ data and censoring of right-wing media.

Obamacare plan rates to fall in 2020 for second time under Trump
Despite actions to undercut program, marketplaces appear mostly stable

Protesters demonstrate against the Republicans’ health care legislation in 2017 outside the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ohio officials faced a situation in the summer of 2017 they viewed as dire: No health insurers were expected to offer any marketplace plans in as many as 20 counties. 

In Ohio and around the nation, officials scrambled that year to recruit insurers to make sure that every county had at least one plan in the marketplaces created by the 2010 health care law. Insurers, deeply skeptical of the future of the law and the Trump administration’s oversight of it, raised monthly premiums before open enrollment for 2018, further raising worries about the marketplaces’ stability.

Pentagon caught in a political fight over impeachment inquiry
Defense officials have rejected congressional demands for information on withholding of Ukraine aid

The Pentagon is a key player in House Democrats' impeachment inquiry into Trump's dealings with Ukraine. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Rather than stay out of the fray, the Defense Department has taken sides in a bitter and historic partisan brawl, choosing to fortify President Donald Trump’s stonewall rather than cooperate with Congress.

The Pentagon is a key player in House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry into Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. And defense officials, who have until now been largely unscathed by the investigation, have rejected congressional demands for information about their role in the White House decision to withhold $250 million in military aid to Ukraine.

Trump ‘lynching’ tweet just latest impeachment myth — from both sides
Inquiry has featured misleading statements thrust into ether by GOP and Dems, muddying probe

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 10. His comparison of the ongoing impeachment inquiry to a "lynching" drew bipartisan criticism. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump’s comparison of his possible impeachment as a “lynching” set off a war of words Tuesday between his staunchest defenders and his fiercest critics. Accusations have flown back and forth during the nearly month-old inquiry, but they have not always rung accurate — or been even remotely true.

Trump’s “lynching” tweet is a prime example of the latter, with even some of his political allies making a rare break with a president who still has the support, according to multiple polls, of nearly 90 percent of Republican voters. But both sides have been guilty of pushing myths about how this impeachment is playing out and the nature of the constitutionally based process.

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 23
Democratic senators try FOIA route to get Ukraine correspondence between White House and Justice Department

Attorney General William Barr is the subject of the latest Ukraine-related document request. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Three Democratic senators are trying a new approach to try to get correspondence between the Justice Department and the White House about contacts with Ukraine and other foreign governments regarding President Donald Trump’s political opponents.

Senate Judiciary Committee members Kamala Harris of California, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island are sending a request under the Freedom of Information Act to Attorney General William Barr seeking any such documents.

‘That’s not believable’ — Cardin has heated exchange with administration official

Then the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, James Jeffrey testifies at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

James Jeffrey, the Trump administration’s special envoy for Syria and countering the Islamic State, called President Trump’s decision two weeks ago to abruptly remove U.S. troops in northern Syria a “tragic situation,” but added that after a five-day ceasefire, “we’re in a better place now than we were a week ago.”

‘We have been scorned’: Democratic Women’s Caucus lays out agenda
U.S. maternal mortality rate is a top concern

Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna S. Pressley had a few choice words to share at a Tuesday event for the Democratic Women’s Caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned — well, we have been scorned,” Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna S. Pressley said Tuesday, lending a little sass to  the Democratic Women’s Caucus news conference to roll out its policy agenda.

Formally launched this spring, the caucus laid out plans for the 116th Congress that focus on economic opportunity, safety and freedom from violence, equality, access to health care, supporting women in the military and veterans, and empowering women across the globe.

Four spending bills on the move; Democrats eye allocations deal
Leaders scramble to make headway on appropriations for fiscal year before stopgap measure runs dry

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., and Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill. (right), arrive for the House Democrats caucus meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic leaders Tuesday called for bicameral talks to reconcile competing spending allocations for long-delayed fiscal 2020 appropriations bills.

With barely five weeks left before the current stopgap funding measure runs dry, congressional leaders are scrambling to make headway on appropriations for the fiscal year that began on Oct.1. Lawmakers have already acknowledged that another stopgap could be needed to fund at least part of the government and avoid a shutdown before Thanksgiving.