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Vulnerable House Republicans Head Into Midterm Recess With Parting Gifts
Half of GOP incumbents in danger of losing seats got floor votes this month on bills they sponsored

Rep. Steve Knight, R-Calif., who’s facing a tough re-election, has two of his bills on the House floor this week. Other vulnerable Republicans are also getting votes on their bills before they depart for the midterm campaign recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the House prepares to wrap up its fall legislative business this week before going on recess for the duration of the midterm campaign season, half of the vulnerable Republican incumbents will be leaving with parting gifts. 

Those gifts come in the form of floor votes on bills they have authored. By the end of the week, 28 of the 57 House Republicans whose seats are considered in play this cycle, according to Inside Elections with Nathan L. Gonzales, are set to go home with the chamber having voted this month on at least one of their bills. 

In Minnesota Trump Country, Democrats Try to Hold On — Again
Ancestrally blue 8th District is a top GOP pickup opportunity

Former state Rep. Joe Radinovich speaks with dairy farmer Martin Wagner during the Morrison County Convention of the Minnesota Farmers Union at Royal Cafe in Little Falls last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

LITTLE FALLS, Minn. — Joe Radinovich was a junior in high school when he came home from track practice and heard a gunshot.

He found his little brother, who had attempted suicide, on the floor. 

Road Ahead: McConnell and Kavanaugh Set the Tone for the Week
Funding, authorization deadlines must work around Supreme Court chaos

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., exits the senators-only elevator as he arrives in the Capitol on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The dissonance in Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s speech opening the Senate floor Monday set the tone for the week on Capitol Hill.

On the one hand, Republicans and Democrats will be at each other’s throats over how they’re handling the growing number of sexual assault allegations directed at Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. On the other hand, they need to reach out for each other’s hands to ensure they get deals to fund the government past the end of the Sept. 30 fiscal year and meet other important deadlines. 

Getting Stung Is All in a Day’s Work for This Senator
When he’s home, Pennsylvania Republican tends daily to his ‘aggressive’ beehive

Sen. Patrick J. Toomey's beehive produced seven gallons of honey last year. (Courtesy Patrick Toomey)

Sen. Patrick J. Toomey holds out both his hands.

“You notice any difference?” the Pennsylvania Republican asks.

Trump Super PAC Goes After Michigan Democrat Challenging Bishop
America First is spending against Elissa Slotkin in the 8th District

America First Action is spending in Michigan’s 8th District to help GOP Rep. Mike Bishop. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

America First Action, a super PAC aligned with President Donald Trump, is launching an attack ad against Democrat Elissa Slotkin, who’s challenging GOP Rep. Mike Bishop in Michigan’s 8th District.

The spot, obtained first by Roll Call, knocks the former acting assistant secretary of Defense for her time in Washington during the Obama administration. The ad will run on broadcast and cable, beginning Tuesday through Oct. 9.

Justice Department Issues Indictment for 2013 Congressional Trip to Azerbaijan
Feds allege nonprofit concealed that trip was funded by foreign government

A 2013 congressional delegation trip to Azerbaijan has resulted in an indictment being handed down to the head of the nonprofit, whom the government alleges concealed the source of funding for the journey. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Justice Department has issued an indictment of former non-profit head Kevin Oksuz for his role in a plot to hide the fact that a 2013 congressional delegation trip to Azerbaijan was funded by that country’s government.

According to the indictment, which was unsealed Monday, Kevin, also known as Kemal, Oksuz allegedly lied on disclosure forms filed with the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Ethics prior to, and following, a privately sponsored congressional trip to Azerbaijan. Oksuz ran a Houston based nonprofit that he is accused of using to funnel money to fund the congressional trip from an oil company controlled by the Azerbaijan government.

Double Drama: Kavanaugh, Rosenstein Await Trump's Return from UN Conference
Penn Ave Report — connecting Congress and the White House at the intersection of politics

Thursday Could Be Most Consequential Day of Trump’s Tumultuous Tenure
Kavanaugh and accuser face senators as president meets with Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein

President Donald Trump speaks at the United Nations on Monday. When he returns to Washington, a big day awaits him on Thursday. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — Circumstance, confusion and chaos have collided to ensure Thursday will be one of the most consequential — and perhaps the most by a wide margin — days of the tumultuous Trump presidency.

Washington has rarely seen the kind of spectacle ahead in just a few days, and the inevitable ramifications will trigger ripple waves that will be immediately apparent but not fully known until voters head to the ballot box on Nov. 6. For President Donald Trump, the already high stakes seem to only grow by the day.

Blumenthal: Trump Firing Rosenstein Would Be a “Break the Glass Moment”
 

Sen. Richard Blumenthal said Monday that if President Donald Trump fired Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein it would be a “break the glass moment." 

“Our democracy will be under attack,” the Connecticut Democrat said at a news conference alongside over 100 Yale Law students. “The president will be, in effect, obstructing justice.” 

Kavanaugh Undeterred by Sexual Assault Allegations
Trump and Senate Republicans stood by him Monday

Protesters assemble at the Supreme Court on Monday to oppose the nomination of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh after new allegations of sexual misconduct emerged. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans showed no signs of faltering in their support for embattled Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who again insisted Monday that he wanted to clear his name at a public hearing this week after a second allegation of sexual misconduct emerged Sunday night.

As hundreds of protesters gathered at different spots on Capitol Hill to oppose his confirmation, Kavanaugh sent a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee to say he would not withdraw his nomination and looks forward to the hearing set for Thursday. The federal appeals court judge characterized allegations of sexual misconduct against him as “smears, pure and simple.”