econ

The back and forth on why Mueller’s report hasn’t been released yet
 

Democrats are demanding that Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report be made public, but various Republicans are quick to object, saying Attorney General William Barr needs time to determine how to do that.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday there are “two things [Barr] will have to grapple with,” including classified information that may appear in the report and “innocent people’s reputations.”

Senate Democrats dodge vote on Green New Deal resolution
Republicans had hoped to force 2020 presidential hopefuls into a tight spot

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., questions William P. Barr, nominee to he Attorney General of the United States, during his confirmation hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats backed away from a Green New Deal resolution offered by Republicans, even though it copied the version introduced and cheered by many Democratic lawmakers, including those running for president.

With all Republicans voting in the negative on the procedural vote, the resolution introduced by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was thwarted, 0-57, preventing further action on the measure.

As Democrats press for full Mueller report — all of it — GOP erects barriers
McConnell says he wants to avoid throwing ‘innocent people under the bus’

President Donald Trump takes questions from reporters he arrives with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for the Senate Republicans’ lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 26, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats want to see the full Mueller report in its full, unredacted form. President Donald Trump has suggested that that’s fine by him.

But Republican leaders on Capitol Hill nudged Attorney General William Barr to color out some significant redactions before he releases special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s report to Congress. House Democratic committee chairmen have given him an April 2 deadline to do so.

Supreme Court skeptical on stopping partisan gerrymandering
The court grappled with the issue last term, before punting back to lower courts without deciding the main issue

Police stand guard near protesters in front of the Supreme Court on the day new associate justice, Brett Kavanaugh, will hear his first arguments on Oct. 9, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court did not appear ready to put constraints on partisan gerrymandering after oral arguments in two cases Tuesday, as conservative justices aired concerns about how judges would decide when politics weighed too heavily in drawing congressional maps.

Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. and other justices who make up the conservative majority of the court repeatedly voiced concerns about what standard the Supreme Court could establish to guide state legislatures when carving up their state into federal districts.

Trump, aides intensify post-Mueller offensive against Democrats
Saying president is ‘open’ to a meeting, Kellyanne Conway asks: ‘Where are they?’

President Donald Trump, alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks to the media about the Mueller report before a Senate Republican policy lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senior White House officials continued their post-Mueller report offensive Tuesday against Democrats by contending the opposition party is obsessed with investigating President Donald Trump and unwilling to negotiate on legislation.

The new line of attack came after Trump and his team on Monday went on the offensive by accusing some involved in investigating him with “treasonous” acts and hit Democrats with a charge of attempting to “overthrow” the federal government. But by Tuesday, the White House said it was ready to open talks on infrastructure and drug pricing legislation —alleging that Democrats refuse to come to the table.

This Democrat wants free tampons and pads available in all federal buildings
Rep. Grace Meng’s push for access to menstrual products includes schools and prisons

Rep. Grace Meng proposed a measure to require all public federal buildings, including those on the Capitol campus, to provide free menstrual products. (Katherine Tully-McManus/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Grace Meng introduced a bill Tuesday that would require all public federal buildings, including those on the Capitol campus, to provide free pads and tampons in the restrooms.

The bill, called the Menstrual Equity For All Act of 2019, would give states the option to use federal grant funding to provide students with free menstrual products in schools, and it would require Medicaid to cover the cost of menstrual products for recipients. The proposal would also amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to require the Department of Labor to issue a rule requiring private employers, with not less than 100 employees, to provide free menstrual hygiene products for their employees.

House set to approve committee funds; largest boost for House Ethics panel
Update of House Ethics Manual underway

The House on Tuesday approved funding levels for committee activities in the 116th Congress. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House is set to approve funding levels for committee activities in the 116th Congress later this week, providing the largest boost to the House Ethics Committee. 

The House resolution, advanced by the House Administration panel on Monday night, will authorize funding for all of the standing and select committee in the House, excluding the Appropriations Committee. It is expected on the floor before the end of the week. 

Mike Lee makes fun of the Green New Deal using Reagan riding a dinosaur, Star Wars tauntauns and Sharknado
 

Sen. Mike Lee took to the Senate chamber with a series of bizarre and comical floor charts. They included one depicting former President Ronald Reagan holding a machine gun while riding a velociraptor and another showing Utah Gov. Gary Herbert fending off a shark from the movie “Sharknado 4.”

The goal of the Utah Republican's humorous floor speech? “To consider the Green New Deal with the seriousness it deserves.” 

Trump takes post-Mueller victory lap to Hill, but ‘he didn't really dwell on it’
Senators say POTUS mostly focused on trade as administration pivots to health care fight

President Donald Trump alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., (left) and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., talks to the media about Robert S. Mueller III’s report upon arriving for the Senate Republican Policy luncheon in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s post-Mueller victory lap included a Tuesday strategy session with Senate Republicans, but several members said Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III finding no criminal conspiracy with Russia in 2016 was not the focus of his visit.

“He didn’t really dwell on it. He just simply made it very clear that he felt really good about the fact that their report came out and it said exactly what he had been saying all along that there was, you know, no collusion between him and the Russian government,” Republican Sen. Mike Rounds of South Dakota said.

The case for primaries: Arizona edition
Mark Kelly may have avoided an intraparty fight, but that may hurt more than help

Arizona Democrat Mark Kelly, here with his wife, former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, in 2018, appears to have avoided a primary in his bid for Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats breathed a sigh of relief this week when Rep. Ruben Gallego decided not to run for the Senate, likely avoiding a primary in the run-up to a competitive general election in Arizona. That’s because “bitter,” “bloody,” and “bruising” seem to be the most commonly used adjectives to describe primaries these days, even though they can serve an important purpose.

Gallego’s decision all but paved the way for retired astronaut Mark Kelly to win the Democratic nomination and focus on challenging appointed Republican Sen. Martha McSally. But while Kelly has had a public profile as a gun control advocate alongside his wife, former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, he’s never been a candidate for office, and it’s still unclear how he’ll perform.