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Federal workers protest ongoing shutdown; union leaders arrested
12 people were arrested by Capitol Police outside of McConnell's office in the Russell Senate Office Building

Federal workers and contractors, along with their unions, staged a protest calling for and end to the government shutdown. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Twelve protesters advocating an end to the government shutdown were arrested Wednesday outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office. 

The twelve were arrested by Capitol Police in the Russell Senate Office Building just before 2 p.m., following a larger demonstration where furloughed federal workers and their unions raised their voices. They have been charged with “crowding, obstructing, or incommoding,” according to USCP spokesperson Eva Malecki.

Chuck Grassley reminds U.S. Olympic Committee about requirements for its tax exemption
Finance chairman fires off new questions about the USOC's handling of sexual abuse

Finance Chairman Charles E. Grassley is raising questions about the U.S. Olympic Committee’s tax status. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The United States Olympic Committee might have more cause to worry about its tax exemption.

In a new letter to USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland, new Senate Finance Charles E. Grassley asks a series of questions about the committee’s work to protect athletes from abuse.

Watch: 12 demonstrators arrested outside McConnell’s Russell office
 

Hundreds of federal workers held a mostly silent demonstration in the Hart Senate office building Wednesday afternoon to protest the ongoing partial government shutdown. A dozen demonstrators were also arrested outside of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Russell office.

What Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Dick Cheney have in common
Political Theater, Episode 53

Renee Tsao, left, discusses politics and the movies with Political Theater podcast host Jason Dick. (Toula Vlahou/CQ Roll Call)

What do Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and former Vice President Dick Cheney have in common?

In addition to being political power brokers, films about them have now been nominated for Academy Awards, for the documentary “RBG” and feature film “Vice,” respectively. So politics, which has gotten a bit of a bad rap lately, (see shutdown, 2019, for more), can be both interesting, entertaining and profitable for Hollywood? Well, yes and no, says Renee Tsao, vice president of PR Collaborative, who discusses politics and movies on the latest Political Theater podcast. 

Pelosi to Trump: Find another venue for State of the Union
Speaker officially uninvites president from Capitol for annual address

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has informed President Donald Trump that absent the end of the shutdown, the House will not host him for the State of the Union. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In the latest escalation of a war between branches of government, Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday informed President Donald Trump that she will not host him in the House chamber next week so he can deliver his State of the Union address.

“I am writing to inform you that the House of Representatives will not consider a concurrent resolution authorizing the President’s State of the Union address in the House Chamber until government has opened,” the California Democrat said. “Again, I look forward to welcoming you to the House on a mutually agreeable date for this address when government has been opened.”

Michael Cohen postpones testimony, cites Trump’s ‘threats’ against family
Trump had tweeted to his supporters last week to ‘Watch [Cohen’s] father-in-law’

Michael Cohen, a former personal attorney for President Trump, was to testify before Congress on Feb. 7. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Michael Cohen has postponed his Feb. 7 testimony in front of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform due to “ongoing threats against his family” from President Donald Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani.

Cohen's lawyer, Lanny Davis, announced the cancellation in an emailed statement on Wednesday, citing  Cohen’s continued cooperation with “ongoing investigations” as a reason for delaying his House testimony, in addition to the threats from Trump and Giuliani.

Liberal ‘dark money’ groups spent more in 2018 than conservative groups
Majority Forward led the list of top liberal nonprofit spenders

For the first time since the Citizens United Supreme Court decision, liberal “dark money” groups outspent conservative groups in an election cycle, according to a new report from Issue One.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The new Democratic House majority is making campaign finance overhaul a central part of its sweeping good governance agenda, capitalizing on an anti-money-in-politics platform that many candidates rode to Congress.

But when it comes to the big-money world of outside spending, over which candidates have little control, it appears that liberal groups had a banner year in 2018.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee to step down as chairwoman of Judiciary subcommittee and CBCF
She will temporarily step away from the subcommittee, and an aide said there's no timeline for her return

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee is temporarily stepping down from her leadership of a House Judiciary subcommittee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee is temporarily stepping down from her leadership of a House Judiciary subcommittee, following a lawsuit claiming she fired a staffer who said she was raped by a superior at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation.

Jackson Lee, a Texas Democrat, was chairwoman of the Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations subcommittee, where she has focused on protecting special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and gun violence prevention.

White House acknowledges shutdown could freeze economic growth
’You could end up with a number very close to zero in the first quarter’ White House economist says

Kevin Hassett, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, speaks to the press about the economy during the daily press briefing ON June 5. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

In a downward shift, the White House acknowledged Wednesday the partial government shutdown could stifle economic growth.

White House officials during the 33-day shutdown have tried to dismiss economists’ and congressional Democrats’ warnings that it could drag down the economy. But that changed a bit Wednesday, just as President Donald Trump gears up for a re-election campaign that he wants to focus, in part, on what he says is a roaring economy with low unemployment.