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Democratic Lawmakers Feel Boost from Women’s March
Minority party hopes movement will help Congress rein in Trump

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington, holding signs during the women’s march on Saturday, the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol Dome was more than just a symbolic backdrop for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. It was the intended target of hundreds of thousands of voices of frustration with President Donald Trump. 

For all of the anti-Trump placards — both crude and shrewd — many marchers descended on the nation’s capital to send a message to the branch of government that, they hope, will be a check on the new president.

Price Faces Tough Questions on Stock Trading, Health Care Law

Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., takes his seat before the start of his confirmation hearing in the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Tom Price sought in a contentious hearing Wednesday to defend his purchases of medical stocks against Democratic charges of conflicts of interest.

Price told Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, the ranking Democrat on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee that held the hearing, that he bought Australian biotech Innate Immunotherapeutics shares after talking with Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., about the company. Collins serves as a director of the company. That raises questions about whether that would be a potential violation of the STOCK Act which prohibits lawmakers from benefiting from insider information or ethics rules. However, Price said he did not receive information that was not public.

Gwen Moore to Attend Inauguration as 'The Resistance'
Moore's decision comes as the list of Democrats skipping the festivities grows

Rep. Gwen Moore says she is attending the Inauguration as the face of opposition to President-elect Dona'd Trump's "repugnant" policies. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Many Democrats are planning to skip Friday’s inaugural activities over their objections to President-elect Donald Trump, but not Wisconsin Rep. Gwen Moore.

“As a proud Democrat, I want President-elect Trump to see me front and center as he’s sworn in,” Moore said in a statement Wednesday. “I want him to see exactly what his opposition looks like. When he sees me, I want him to see The Resistance.”

House Freshmen to Watch
115th Congress provides a platform for ambitious new members

Kihuen, left, comes to Congress with a record of success in Nevada, and the blessing of former Sen. Harry Reid. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Not all freshmen are created equal.

While there is always a learning curve for new members of the House, some of the newly elected come to the institution with an enhanced profile. This could be because they are former statewide officeholders, or perhaps scored a big one for the team by knocking off a longtime incumbent. Maybe they are natural leaders or their ambitions are such that they are already looking at other federal offices. 

Porn, Weed and Other Takeaways From Sessions Hearing
AG hopeful could flip DOJ positions on obscenity and online gambling.

Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on his nomination for attorney general on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Jeff Sessions revealed several policy changes he might bring to the Justice Department during his confirmation hearing this week to be attorney general in the Trump administration.

The main focus was the Alabama Republican defending his record from criticism by Democratic lawmakers and civil rights groups, who question his independence and whether he will enforce voting rights and other laws important to minorities and women. But moments that didn’t grab headlines give new insight into Sessions’ legal thinking on some issues and what he’ll do if he is confirmed.

Nevada Democrats Want McCarran Statue Removed From Capitol
Harry Reid wanted his name removed from Las Vegas airport

Rep. Jacky Rosen is one of three Democratic members of Congress who wants to see former Sen. Patrick McCarran's statue removed from Statuary Hall in the Senate (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Three Nevada Democratic House members want the statue of former Nevada Sen. Patrick McCarran's removed from the Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

Reps. Dina Titus, Ruben Kihuen and Jacky Rosen sent a letter to Nevada's Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval criticizing McCarran's legacy of xenophobia and antisemitism, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

In Break from Trump, Mattis Pushes for Tough Stance on Russia

Secretary of Defense nominee James Mattis testifies during his confirmation hearing in the Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

James Mattis, Donald Trump’s choice for Defense secretary, advocated several shifts in U.S. national security policy in his confirmation hearing Thursday, including a much tougher stance on Russia than the president-elect has articulated.

On several topics during his Senate Armed Services testimony, the retired Marine Corps four-star general differed in substance or tone from positions Trump took in the campaign. Unless Trump or Mattis changes his view, the contrasts could lead to tensions between the White House and the Pentagon.

Study: Economy Was Top Issue Among Millennial Voters
More voted for Trump than had said they were going to before the election, survey shows

Many young voters expressed dissatisfaction with both presidential candidates in last year’s presidential election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new study conducted after the election shows that the economy mattered most to millennial voters.

The study by the Millennial Impact Report surveyed 350 young voters they had surveyed in different waves throughout the election.

Trump Veers From Gloater in Chief to Martyr-Elect
But president-elect shows little appreciation for responsibilities

It is “foolish patriotism” to expect President-elect Donald Trump to change his tune once he enters the Oval Office, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ever since the election, I have been one of those Donald Trump skeptics, desperately clinging to the fantasy of the Harry Truman Effect. Somehow I hoped that, once again, the fates that watch over our democracy would take a man of seemingly ordinary clay — like Truman or Jerry Ford — and mold him into a larger, more presidential, figure.

There were moments at the beginning of Trump’s first press conference in nearly six months when, if you really squinted, you might see tentative signs of such a miraculous transformation.

Combative Trump Won't Divest Holdings, Vows Obamacare Replacement Soon
President-elect won't reveal next steps on Russian hacking

President-elect Donald Trump speaks at a news conference at Trump Tower on Wednesday in New York City. The wild affair was Trump’s first official news conference since his November election win. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump used his first post-election news conference on Wednesday to acknowledge that Russia hacked Democratic Party email systems, refuse to divest his business holdings, and vow to unveil a replacement for the 2010 health care law in a few weeks.

Nine days before he is to be sworn in, Trump started subdued but then turned defiant, engaging in an angry exchange with a CNN reporter and refusing to answer his question. “Not you. Not you. Your organization is terrible. Quiet. Quiet. Don’t be rude. You are fake news,” Trump shot at correspondent Jim Acosta.