trade

Trump‘s car import move is getting panned
The decision to set an 180-day clock ticking on possible trade action has drawn criticism from industry, lawmakers and the EU

Brand new cars sit on a truck that is leaving a lot at the Auto Warehousing Company near the Port of Richmond on May 24, 2018 in Richmond, California. U.S. president Donald Trump has set a clock on possible trade action or tariffs against car imports from Japan and Europe. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The White House announcement Friday that President Donald Trump has set a 180-day clock ticking on possible trade action against imports of cars and car parts from Japan and Europe brought strong pushback from the private sector.

The president’s implied threat to use Section 232 authorities to impose tariffs or other trade measures if negotiations to limit imports are not successful cited national security and, in particular, the need to protect research and development by U.S. automakers.

Trump order clears path to ban Huawei 5G equipment from United States
Trump signed an executive order that would allow the Commerce Department to bar transactions from Huawei

The Huawei logo is seen on the side of the main building at the company's production campus on April 25, 2019 in Dongguan, near Shenzhen, China. While commercially successful and dominant in 5G, or fifth-generation networking technology, Huawei has faced political headwinds with the Donald Trump administration. On Wednesday, the president signed an executive order that would allow the Commerce Department to bar transactions from Huawei. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order allowing the Commerce Department to stop U.S. companies from doing business with companies “subject to the jurisdiction” of a foreign adversary, clearing a path to bar transactions with Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant that officials have labeled a national security threat.

But asked whether the executive order is meant to take direct aim at Huawei, senior administration officials described it as “company and country agnostic.”

Capitol Ink | Dragon Fire

Trump should say less on trade. The stock markets will thank him
Transparency’s a good thing, but the president’s tweets only rattle the markets

This kind of instability only brings back the gnawing fear so many Americans experienced in the throes of the 2008 financial crisis, Winston writes. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

OPINION — Well, we’re back on the trade roller coaster this week — and as we’ve learned over the past year, it can be a bumpy ride that takes a strong stomach just to hang on.

But here we are again, with the markets tanking on Monday as the Dow took a 2.4 percent hit and the Nasdaq, so dependent on big tech, dropped nearly 270 points, a 3.4 percent loss, raising new fears that stalled trade deals threaten to slow the country’s booming economy. As I write this on Tuesday, happily, the markets have recovered some of Monday’s losses.

Capitol Ink | Uncle Soy

Trump targets 2020 Democrats as energy speech turns into campaign stop
A six-pack of eyebrow-raising POTUS quotes, just in time for happy hour

President Donald Trump turned an event in Louisiana into a chance to knock several potential 2020 rivals. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | President Donald Trump went to Louisiana to talk about his energy policies, but as frequently happens, an official White House event at times sounded a lot like a campaign stump speech.

Trump used parts of his speech to describe a booming economy with low unemployment — weeks after acknowledging to reporters he intends to run on the state of the economy. Of course, Trump did not bring up his trade “squabble” with China, which Democratic lawmakers and economists warn could help spawn an economic slowdown just as he revs up his reelection bid.

Nearly half seeking exclusions from new Trump tariffs on China get preliminary OK
The roughly 46.5 percent success rate is a sign trade officials are open to company arguments requesting relief from tariffs

A container ship sits docked at the Port of Oakland on May 13, 2019 in Oakland, California. China retaliated to U.S. President Donald Trump's 25 percent tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese goods entering the United States with a 25 percent tariff on $60 billion of U.S. goods entering China. The U.S. Trade Representative’s Office has given preliminary approval to 40 percent of companies seeking exclusions. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Companies hoping to sidestep the recent increase in tariffs on many imports from China may take heart from data released by the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office: More than 40 percent of those seeking exclusions for specific products have won at least a preliminary thumbs-up.

Of the 13,757 requests for exclusions of specific products from tariffs as of May 10, the USTR has reached a preliminary decision on 13,007, granting 1,957 and giving 4,089 approval in an initial substantive review. Almost 7,000 requests were denied.

‘Grimmer by the day’ — Farmers’ love for Trump in peril
President’s trade actions are testing farmers in ways they never imagined

President Donald Trump’s trade actions are testing American farmers in ways they never imagined, Murphy writes, even though that’s exactly what he campaigned on. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — The love affair between President Donald Trump and rural America has always made sense to me.

When I covered the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump often went to remote farm communities where Democrats, and even other Republican candidates, never bothered.

U.S.-China trade fight fuels uncertainty as Beijing retaliates
The new round of tariffs would mean all imported Chinese goods entering the U.S. face duties

U.S. President Donald Trump listens to a question from the media during a meeting with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, in the Oval Office on May 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump took questions on trade with China, Iran and other topics. Trump’s administration has moved to impose new tariffs on $300 billion of imported consumer goods from China.(Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The future of U.S.-China trade talks is uncertain as the Trump administration moves to impose new tariffs on $300 billion of imported consumer and industrial goods from China, and U.S. companies prepare for higher costs of doing business.

The new round of tariffs would mean all imported Chinese goods entering the U.S. face duties imposed under Section 301 of 1974 trade legislation. In 2018, the U.S. imported $540 billion of Chinese products. The Section 301 tariffs currently apply to $250 billion in goods from China.

Trump pledges to reject dirt from other countries on 2020 foes
POTUS has new warnings for China and Iran, including even more tariffs for Asian rival

President Trump (right) speaks as Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán looks on in the Oval Office on Monday. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday vowed to reject any dirt on his 2020 opponents that originates in a foreign country, just a week after his personal attorney canceled a trip to Ukraine allegedly to search for just that.

Trump also threatened to slap tariffs on even more Chinese-made goods as the two economic powerhouses barreled toward a full-scale trade war as markets around the globe dropped significantly.