technology

Markets Tumble Again But White House Not Guaranteeing China Deal
‘We'll see,’ President Trump's top economic adviser says of tricky talks

The flags of China and the United States are displayed in front of the portrait of China’s late communist leader, Mao Zedong, outside the Forbidden City on Nov. 9, 2017 in Beijing, before President Trump’s state visit. (Lintao Zhang/Getty Images file photo)

U.S. markets plunged again Thursday amid doubts the Trump administration and China can strike a legitimate trade deal that would avoid an escalation of tensions and economic turbulence as the White House urges patience — and few guarantees of success.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, NASDAQ and S&P 500 Index all were closed Wednesday as part of a national day of mourning for the late President George H.W. Bush following a Tuesday sell off. But the one-day break did little to calm spooked markets.

Putin, Xi Set to Test ‘America First’ Trump at G-20
Coons says president should ‘end the tariffs’ during dinner with Chinese leader

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint press conference after their summit in July in Helsinki. They are scheduled to meet again at a G-20 summit this weekend in Argentina. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images file photo)

Donald Trump takes his “America first” presidency to Argentina on Thursday for a high-stakes G-20 summit, but lawmakers and experts warn his go-it-alone approach could hamstring his own goals on China, Russia and North Korea.

Trump is expected to pose for the usual “family photo” with the other world leaders gathered in Buenos Aires. There will be one-on-one meetings with allies such as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in as Trump looks to build a unified front against North Korea. And there will be face-to-face talks with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been much more critical than Trump of Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman after Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Trump Retweets Supporter’s Call for GM to Return Bailout Funds
President is angry with U.S. automaker for cutting jobs in key battleground states

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing on Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House earlier this month. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump retweeted a supporter’s call for General Motors to repay billions to the federal government it received as part of last decade’s auto industry bailout. He also warned GM the White House is studying moves he can take using his executive powers to punish the company.

The president shared with his 56 million Twitter followers a tweet by an account with the handle @The_Trump_Train that criticized GM for cutting jobs and production at facilities in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland. It also suggested the automaker return over $10 billion in federal monies it received in the late 2000s to stay afloat.

Trump Threatens GM: Floats Turning off Federal Subsidies
President feels betrayed by U.S. automaker, Kudlow says

President Donald Trump is angry with General Motors executives over job cuts in three U.S. states. White House aide Lawrence Kudlow, right, says Trump feels betrayed after pushing for pro-automaker language in a new trade deal. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump escalated his budding feud with General Motors by suggesting he might end all federal subsidies to the U.S. automaker a day after it cuts jobs at factories in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland.

Trump tweeted that he is “Very disappointed” with GM for ceasing work at facilities in those states but “Nothing being closed in Mexico & China.”

White House Presses China’s Xi Before Trade Talks With Trump
Leaders will break bread amid impasse, tensions Saturday night at G20 summit

U.S. and Chinese flags on a table during a meeting of military leaders in 2014. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi will meet on Saturday night in Argentina. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/Released)

The White House wants to pressure Chinese President Xi Jinping ahead of a high-stakes dinner with President Donald Trump during which the two leaders will attempt to make some progress on long-stalled trade talks.

Lawrence Kudlow, Trump’s chief economic adviser, dismissed Wall Street talk of a coming recession at home. In fact, he said Trump administration officials view the state of the American economy as a major leverage point going into the Saturday Trump-Xi meeting.

Chuck Schumer and Fellow Democrats Want to Stop ‘Grinch Bots’ From Stealing Christmas Toys
Latest effort with Sen. Richard Blumenthal and others seeks to curtail gift-buying bots

Democrats Want to Stop “Grinch Bots’ from stealing Christmas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On Black Friday, a group of Democratic lawmakers want to stop “Grinch bots” from scooping up all the inventory of the year’s hottest Christmas presents.

“Grinch bots cannot be allowed to steal Christmas, or dollars, from the wallets of countless consumers,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said in a statement. “Middle class folks save up — a little here, a little there — working to afford the hottest gifts of the season for their kids but ever-changing technology and its challenges are making that very difficult. It’s time we help restore an even playing field by blocking the bots.”

Pentagon, Homeland Security Helping Private Companies Defend Against Cyber Threats
Agreement signed in the weeks before the midterms

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and Defense Secretary James Mattis have signed an agreement that is aimed at increasing defenses agains strategic cyber threats. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Pentagon and the Department of Homeland Security reached an agreement in the weeks before the midterm elections to jointly defend the United States against strategic cyber threats, including offering assistance to private companies, top officials from both agencies told lawmakers on Wednesday.

“This agreement clarifies roles and responsibilities between” the Department of Defense and the DHS “to enhance U.S. government readiness to respond to cyber threats and establish coordinated lines of efforts to secure, protect, and defend the homeland,” DHS Assistant Secretary Jeanette Manfra told a joint hearing of the House Armed Services and House Homeland Security committees.

Mark Warner Welcomes Amazon, But Warns Big Tech
Top Democrat on Senate Intelligence wants to see more data transparency from Facebook, others

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., is welcoming Amazon to Arlington County. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One of the Senate’s most tech-savvy members is applauding Amazon’s decision to locate half of HQ2 in Crystal City, but he had some strong language for the technology industry at large when it comes to data privacy.

Sen. Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who resides not far from the part of Northern Virginia that is now slated for investment and redevelopment as an Amazon campus with 25,000 jobs, said he hoped the move would further catalyze a regional technology industry boom.

Court Documents Detail Doxxing of Senate Republicans
Jackson Cosko was reportedly confronted by staffers in Hassan’s office after he used a computer there

Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Orrin Hatch, left, and Mike Lee are among those that Jackson A. Cosko is accused of allegedly posting their personal information online. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Jackson A. Cosko illegally used a computer in the office of Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan and and threatened a Hassan staffer later that day, court documents show. He allegedly is behind the posted personal information about Republican senators on their Wikipedia pages.

The case against Cosko is detailed in an affidavit submitted in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that includes details of how Cosko allegedly posted cell phone numbers and home addresses of the senators onto the web from House and Senate computer networks.

In Trade Pact, Trump Sees Trap for Democrats and Warning to China
Kudlow: If Democrats ‘want to help working folks, they’ll go with this deal’

President Donald Trump, with Senate candidate Rep. Marsha Blackburn, at a campaign rally Monday night in Johnson City, Tenn. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

One word stood out this week as President Donald Trump’s top trade negotiator, Robert Lighthizer, described an updated North American trade pact: “progressive.”

Also notable during a half-hour discussion about the agreement Lighthizer held with a group of reporters: He was complimentary of the Obama administration’s Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact with Asian countries from which Trump withdrew. He even admitted the new North American agreement is “built on” many aspects of TPP.