taxes

Roskam Tells Trump to Speak to Putin More Like Reagan Would
GOP congressman says Trump was ‘very defensive’ in conversation about Helsinki news conference

Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., said he confronted President Donald Trump about his news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Peter Roskam said President Donald Trump delivered a “very defensive” response on Tuesday when he confronted the president about siding with Russian President Vladimir Putin at their joint news conference in Helsinki, Finland, on Monday, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

Roskam was at the White House for a meeting with Trump in which the president walked back his comments from Monday that he saw “no reason why it would be Russia” that interfered in the 2016 election, affirmed that he trusted his intelligence community’s assessment that it was Russia, and then immediately sought to undercut that assessment by saying there “could be other people also — a lot of people out there.”

Lawmakers Across the Aisle Fight Canadian Newsprint Tariffs
Import tax on paper is hurting local news, members tell International Trade Commission

Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., speaks with Roll Call in the Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nineteen members of Congress spoke Tuesday against the Commerce Department’s tariffs on Canadian newsprint, telling the U.S. International Trade Commission the import tax hurt local newspapers.

The bipartisan group of legislators asked the ITC to reverse tariffs the Commerce Department imposed on Canadian newsprint imports. Opponents of the tariffs say they would deal a major blow to local newspapers, which already struggle to stay afloat, by increasing the cost of newsprint.

IRS Ruling on Political Donation Reporting Sets Off Campaign Finance Fight
McConnell cheers, but Democrats blast decision, arguing it reduces transparency

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell praised the new IRS policy in a Tuesday morning speech. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Monday’s announcement by the Treasury Department that it will no longer collect information about donors to some political nonprofits was met with applause from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, perhaps the leading advocate for unrestricted campaign donations. At the same time, it ignited a campaign finance fight with the midterm elections less than four months away.

“It’s bad enough to wield government power to chill political speech and invite harassment of citizens — based on what an angry mob might assume their opinions are, based on their private financial records,” the Kentucky Republican said on the Senate floor Monday. “It’s even more egregious to pursue that nakedly political goal while calling it ‘good government.’ In this country, good government means protecting citizens’ First Amendment rights to participate in the competition of ideas — not trying to shut down that competition.”

Former Ways and Means Aide to Replace Marc Short
Shahira Knight had advised Trump on economic matters

Shahira Knight, then of the House Ways and Means Committee, at a Holiday Wine and Spirits Reception held by Allied Domecq. She’s the new White House legislative affairs director. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Shahira Knight, a former senior aide on the House’s top tax-writing panel, will become President Donald Trump’s top liaison to Congress, the White House announced Thursday.

Her appointment comes after legislative affairs director Marc Short’s long-expected departure became official Thursday morning. It also comes as Knight will inherit an expected fight over Trump’s second Supreme Court nominee and an expected struggle to pass spending bills after the president vowed to never again sign an omnibus appropriations package like the one he reluctantly made law earlier this year.

Citing No Regrets About Retiring, Paul Ryan Bets Kevin McCarthy Will Replace Him
Outgoing speaker will not rule out a future presidential bid

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday he has no regrets about retiring. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s Thursday interview with David M. Rubenstein, president of the Economic Club of Washington, D.C., started with an admission that he has no regrets — “none whatsoever” — about retiring. It then diverted into a wide array of topics including his replacement, future plans and policy goals for his last few months in office.

The Wisconsin Republican reiterated his preference that House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy succeed him as speaker when asked about his replacement.

Marc Short Creates Another Void in the White House
Trump has ‘highest turnover of top-tier staff of any recent president,’ professor says

Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director, outside the Senate Republican policy lunches in the Capitol in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short will leave his post this summer after helping President Donald Trump secure tax cuts, a Supreme Court justice, eliminate part of the Obama-era health law, open the Arctic for energy extraction, and nix a slew of federal regulations.

Short — with his signature shaved head — was the most visible Trump administration official on Capitol Hill, often chatting with reporters as he traversed the hallways going from meetings with leadership and rank-and-file members about the president’s legislative whims and demands. Affable yet firm, Short seemed eager to joust with reporters on cable news, the Hill and even under the blistering summer sun in the White House’s north driveway.

Missouri ‘Deserves Better’ Than McCaskill, Pence Says in Kansas City
VP applies pressure on Democratic senator over coming high court vote

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., was the target of Vice President Mike Pence when he made a stop in her home state on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Vice President Mike Pence told an audience in Missouri the state “deserves better” than Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill, whom he pressured to vote for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

“The Democratic Party has gone farther to the left than ever before. And you only need to look at Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill to see that,” he said during remarks in Kansas City. “Every single Democrat in Congress voted against President Trump’s tax cuts. When it came time to cut your taxes, Sen. Claire McCaskill voted no.”

Analysis: Top Brow-Furrowing Moments From Trump’s Tax Bash
‘The economy is indeed doing well,’ president says before addressing newsroom murders

President Donald Trump on Friday asked invited guests if they were aware that the U.S. economy is the world’s largest. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

This might be remembered as the week President Donald Trump, back in campaign mode, got his sharp-tongued rhetorical groove back. And he kept it up Friday, even while making his first public remarks about a shooting at a Maryland newsroom that occurred roughly 30 miles from the White House and left five dead.

The president came to the White House’s East Room for a long-scheduled event on the six-month-anniversary of a GOP tax law he signed in late December with a prepared statement about the Annapolis shooting at the Capital Gazette office.

The IRS Tax Collector Cometh
Trump pick to lead agency closer to confirmation

Charles Rettig is President Donald Trump's nominee to be Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service. (Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump’s pick to lead the IRS, longtime tax lawyer Charles Rettig, breezed through his confirmation hearing Thursday with the Senate Finance Committee.

Senators on both sides mostly questioned Rettig about his views on tax administration issues, including the agency’s work to implement the new tax law. Rettig, who is currently with the Beverly Hills-based firm Hochman, Salkin, Rettig, Toscher & Perez, PC, largely escaped the sort of grilling that many of Trump’s nominees for high-level posts have faced in the past.

Retiring GPO Director Reflects on 38 Years of Public Service
Andrew Sherman helped usher agency into the digital age

Andrew Sherman, right, delivers copies of President George W. Bush’s budget request in February 2008 to House Budget Chairman John M. Spratt Jr., D-S.C., as GPO Chief of Staff Maria S. Lefevre looks on. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After decades of service in the U.S. Government Publishing Office, Andrew M. Sherman is retiring to a simpler life, one without talk of XML files and print-to-digital transformations.

“Well, the pool in my neighborhood closes Labor Day,” Sherman said. “My only plans are to put my feet up after 38 years of work.”