supreme-court

Chuck Grassley and Dianne Feinstein Again Sparring Over Judicial Nominations Schedule
Argument about October nomination hearings could be Kavanaugh fallout

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley and ranking member Dianne Feinstein are once again sparring over the judicial confirmation process. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even with senators having left the Capitol, the battle over the pace of judicial nominations is not slowing down.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, led panel Democrats in protesting the scheduling of nomination hearings for federal judgeships while the Senate is holding only pro forma sessions.

Impeachment or Bust? Democrats Have Few Options on Kavanaugh Inquiries
Lawsuits, possible House probes expected, but party largely staying mum for now

Democratic members of the Senate Judiciary Committee ponder their next move during a session on the nomination of now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh on Sept. 28. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Brett M. Kavanaugh looked bewildered. Sen. Kamala Harris looked perturbed but determined. It was hour ten of the then-Supreme Court nominee’s testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee early last month, and the California Democrat seemed to have him backed into a corner.

Harris, a former prosecutor, was very much back in a courtroom. She was trying to get her witness, Kavanaugh, to reveal the name — or names — of anyone at the Washington law firm of Trump’s personal attorney with whom she alleged he had discussed special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his ongoing Russia election meddling investigation the president almost daily refers to as a “witch hunt.”

They Channel Out-of-Town Outrage
‘Herd on the Hill’ lives vicariously, delivering letters for people in far-away states

Herd on the Hill delivered over a thousand letters to Sen. Susan Collin, R-Maine, in October. (Courtesy Herd on the Hill)

The president of Herd on the Hill went into a planning meeting and announced the name of her group.

Others gasped and grumbled. No press were allowed in the room.

Why Trump Spent His Friday Night in Deep-Red Southwest Ohio
Rep. Steve Chabot won re-election by 18 points in 2016. Now he faces a closer race

President Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Erie Insurance Arena in Erie, Pa., on Wednesday night. Two days later, he took his campaign road show to Ohio. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump took his campaign road show to Ohio on Friday, a state that is a microcosm of the fight his Republican Party faces in next month’s midterm elections.

On the one hand, a recent Suffolk University-Cincinnati Enquirer poll showed a boost in Republican support and enthusiasm for Trump — and, he hopes, GOP candidates by extension. But on the other, those same surveys suggest the overall electorate in the Buckeye State is more likely to vote for Democratic candidates than Republican ones.

In His Own Words: Trump Becomes Spokesman-in-Chief as Midterms Near
President weighs in and Democratic lawmakers fume

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on the South Lawn before boarding Marine One at the White House on Tuesday. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | President Donald Trump on Thursday said Kanye West can “speak for me anytime he wants.” But the controversial rapper is one of the few folks doing so lately.

Worried Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination was in trouble, Trump decided to go on the offensive last week. He sent a message to his conservative base — and other Republican voters — when he declared men are in danger of being “ruined” by a single “false” allegation by a woman. At a campaign rally, he mocked one of Kavanaugh’s accusers as an arena full of his supporters laughed and chanted that she should be thrown in jail.

California Man Charged With Threatening to Kill Sen. Dianne Feinstein
Emailed death threat arrived on Sept. 30 amid pitched partisan battle over Kavanaugh nomination

Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was the target of a death threat on Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A California man has been charged with threatening to kill Sen. Dianne Feinstein amid the pitched partisan battle over the confirmation process of new associate Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office charged Craig Steven Shaver, 47, of Lancaster, California, with a felony count of attempted criminal threats and possession of a firearm by a felon.

Mazie Hirono: ‘I Think Lindsey Is Channeling Trump’
Hawaii Democratic senator replies to GOP Sen. Graham’s criticism of Kavanaugh confirmation ‘mob rule’

Sen. Mazie Hirono dropped some choice remarks on her Judiciary Committee colleague. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham’s sharp critique of her, Sen. Mazie K. Hirono hears echoes of his party’s standard-bearer.

“I do think Lindsey is channeling [President Donald] Trump to a great extent,” the Hawaii Democrat said Tuesday in an interview with the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. “Frankly, it is so outrageous. It just shows that they will say anything to win.”

Kavanaugh Cautious but Active in First Day at Supreme Court
Shakes hands with Kagan before returning to chambers

Police stand guard in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday, the day its newest justice, Brett Kavanaugh, was to hear his first arguments. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Justice Brett Kavanaugh heard oral arguments for the first time Tuesday in cases about one of the Supreme Court’s least favorite criminal laws, jumping into his role with some straightforward questions and little hint of the bitter confirmation process he just went through.

There were no outbursts from protesters in the gallery, as there had been during his Senate confirmation hearings or Saturday’s historic vote. Kavanaugh showed no expression as he took his seat on the right end of the bench, even as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. welcomed him. 

Sen. Lisa Murkowski Could Face Reprisal from Alaska GOP
Alaska Republican was only member of her party to vote against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, talks with the media in the Capitol after voting “no” on a cloture vote that advanced the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to a final vote on October 5, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski could face severe consequences from her state party for her decision to reject new associate Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh at his confirmation vote over the weekend.

The Alaska Republican was the only GOP senator to oppose Kavanaugh’s confirmation, which passed 50-48 mostly along party lines. (Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., voted with Republicans.)

Trump Stokes Tribal Fury in Kavanaugh Ceremony
President accuses Senate Dems of ‘campaign of political and personal destruction’

Protesters opposed to then-Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh take over the atrium of the Hart Senatre Office Building on Oct. 4. Capitol Police were on the scene arresting protesters. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | Donald Trump’s remarks Monday night during a ceremonial swearing-in of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was more than partisan. It personified how the president often fuels America’s increasingly tribal politics.

Washington and the country are trying to recover from several gut-wrenching weeks that included multiple sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh and the emotional testimony of the then-nominee and one of his accusers, Christine Blasey Ford. But the president, during a ceremony in the ornate East Room, did not try to use his office to heal a grieving — and feuding — country.