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What We Learned From Tuesday's Primaries

Tuesday night was a good one for Donald Trump. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump stayed strong in the south and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio's campaign looked weak, despite high-profile endorsement in the Republican primaries. On the Democratic side, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won by a large margin over Vermont Sen. Bernard Sanders in Mississippi, continuing her southern dominance, though in Michigan, Sanders pulled out a close win and a stunning upset. And the race continues.  

So what's next for the campaigns and how will they adjust strategies before upcoming debates and important primaries?  

North Carolinians See Cruz as Moral Choice

Cruz takes the stage at a town-hall style interview in Raleigh. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

RALEIGH, N.C. — As a former pastor, Fred Wolfe has seen plenty of evangelical Christians make a distinction between religion and politics. They look for "toughness, not morals" in their candidates, he said, and so are probably voting for GOP front-runner Donald Trump this year. Wolfe himself, though, is canvassing for Sen. Ted Cruz in North Carolina.  

"He's the first Republican candidate I've been able to support with a clean conscience,"  said Wolfe, 37, one of many conservative Christians who turned out to the hear the Texas Republican speak at Calvary Baptist Church here.  

On Super Tuesday, Confident Trump Woos Kentucky Crowd

Trump, in Kentucky, finds support from voters disillusioned with Washington and demanding change. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Republican front-runner Donald Trump, looking to do well in Super Tuesday presidential primaries and beyond, promised to protect issues that voters  say they’re tired of seeing Washington neglect.  

“I’m ready for change, and I think he’s the one who can do it,” said Karen Dohn, 65, as she watched a crowd of a couple of thousand file into Louisville’s International Convention Center on Tuesday.  

First Look: Can Democrats Win the Senate in 2016?

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For Republicans, the fight for control of the Senate in 2016 is all about playing defense.  

Unlike 2014 (and 2018), the Senate races of 2016 offer few, if any, opportunities for the GOP as the election cycle begins. The map strongly favors Democrats and suggests the possibility of considerable Democratic gains. Republicans hope to recruit strong challengers to Democrats Michael Bennet of Colorado and Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, but the other eight Democratic senators up next year come from states so reliably Democratic that Republicans don’t have any real hope of making them competitive.  

Grassley Preps 2016 Re-Election

Grassley talks on the phone in his Hart Building office. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Charles E. Grassley doesn't plan to be caught flat-footed if he faces a competitive, expensive re-election battle in 2016.  

In a Wednesday interview with CQ Roll Call, the Iowa Republican said he began work on his campaign last year, and there will be more involvement from the national party than in his past efforts, given the exploding costs of campaigns. "I suppose early on, you spend your time on funding the campaign more than on organization, probably working very closely with the NRSC, more so than I have in the past because of the sophistication of campaigning now and the massive amount of money you have to raise compared to what you used to have to have," Grassley said. "The days of cheap campaigns are over."  

Josh Holmes, the Mastermind of Team Mitch

Holmes, right, accompanied McConnell at an election eve campaign stop at an airport in Bowling Green, Ky. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much of the movie "Fargo" takes place in Minnesota, the home state of the aide in charge of the campaign that propelled Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell to the role of Senate majority leader in the next Congress.  

It's fitting that Josh Holmes, the senior adviser whom McConnell commended on stage at his election night gathering in Louisville, would hail from Minnesota, given that another former chief of staff, Billy Piper, once said McConnell was the wood chipper in the movie's gruesome final scene.  

McConnell Warns Senate Control Could Be Unclear Until January

McConnell, right, is the Senate Minority Leader. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call Photo)

BOWLING GREEN, Ky., — At the end of a full day of flying around the Bluegrass State, Sen. Mitch McConnell presented the state of play on the national landscape like a prognosticator instead of a pol who holds the title of Senate minority leader.  

"We think we have a good chance to take the Senate," McConnell said of the Republicans' prospects. "The suspense won't last much longer. Hopefully we'll find out tomorrow night instead of December or January, but there could be additional races beyond tomorrow night."  

Reid: Iowa Loss Would Mean Republican Senate Majority (Updated)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 3:27 p.m., Nov. 1 | Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid may have just unwittingly given Minority Leader McConnell something to smile about.  

"What Joni Ernst would mean, coming to the United States Senate, is that Mitch McConnell would be the leader of the Senate, someone who agrees with her on virtually everything. Think what that would mean to our country," Reid told progressives Saturday, when asked about Ernst's chances in the open-seat race in Iowa.  

Ed Gillespie Throws 'Redskins' Hail Mary

Gillespie is the Republican nominee for Senate in Virginia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call Photo)

Virginia Senate candidate Ed Gillespie said in an ad airing during "Monday Night Football" that he would oppose legislation forcing the Washington Redskins to change the team name.  

"I'll oppose the anti-Redskins bill. Let's focus on creating jobs, raising take-home pay and making our nation safer. And let the Redskins handle what to call their team," said Gillespie, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee.