senate-2014

10 Races to Watch in 2016: North Carolina Senate

Burr is a Republican from North Carolina. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Tar Heel State residents should enjoy the absence of political ads on their airwaves while they can.  

The 2016 Senate race in North Carolina could be just as competitive as the 2014 contest, which flooded local televisions with more than $100 million in political ads to become one of the most expensive congressional races in history. Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., has said he will seek re-election , and some Democrats hope outgoing Sen. Kay Hagan will challenge him. Hagan lost her seat last month to Sen.-elect Thom Tillis. But almost immediately after her defeat, Democrats started talking about a potential comeback campaign in 2016. She ran one of the best campaigns last cycle, and she has not ruled out  running again.  

Louisiana Runoff Results: Mary Landrieu Loses

Cassidy was elected to the Senate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:23 a.m. | Republicans capped their Senate sweep  Saturday night, when Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La., defeated Sen. Mary L. Landrieu, D-La., in a Senate runoff.  

Cassidy, a doctor who still practices, was leading Landrieu, 65 percent to 35 percent when the Associated Press called the race 30 minutes after polls closed. Republicans also retained two House seats in additional runoff races.  Landrieu has a history of winning races that seemed unwinnable. But this time, she was overwhelmed by the GOP wave that gave Republicans seven seats on election night. Landrieu and Cassidy were forced into a runoff after neither secured 50 percent of the vote, as Louisiana requires, to win outright.  

3 Things to Know About the Louisiana Runoff

Landrieu rallies supporters in Shreveport, La. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call Photo)

If you haven’t been paying attention to the Louisiana Senate runoff, we don’t blame you. The race between Democratic Sen. Mary L. Landrieu and Republican Rep. Bill Cassidy could have been a defining contest that determined which party held a majority in the Senate.  

Instead, Republicans swept the Senate in November, and the Louisiana race has become an afterthought.  

Bill Cassidy Utilizes Weekly GOP Address, Again

Cassidy gave the weekly Republican address again last weekend. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Heading into a Dec. 6 runoff in Louisiana against Democratic Sen. Mary L. Landrieu, Rep. Bill Cassidy took a second crack at the Republican weekly address to make his case for election to the Senate.

Just as in his first address in June, the doctor by trade recalled interactions with patients as a prominent forum to hear constituent concerns on the direction of the country.

Josh Holmes, the Mastermind of Team Mitch

Holmes, right, accompanied McConnell at an election eve campaign stop at an airport in Bowling Green, Ky. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Much of the movie "Fargo" takes place in Minnesota, the home state of the aide in charge of the campaign that propelled Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell to the role of Senate majority leader in the next Congress.  

It's fitting that Josh Holmes, the senior adviser whom McConnell commended on stage at his election night gathering in Louisville, would hail from Minnesota, given that another former chief of staff, Billy Piper, once said McConnell was the wood chipper in the movie's gruesome final scene.  

How Thom Tillis Defeated One of 2014's Best Campaigns

Sen.-elect Thom Tillis is a North Carolina Republican. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call).

It’s rare a losing campaign has no regrets. But to the last person, Democrats involved in Sen. Kay Hagan's re-election say they would not have done anything differently.  

Hagan ran one of the best campaigns of the cycle , defying headwinds of an unpopular Democratic president in a state that elected Mitt Romney in 2012. But on Election Day, it was not enough, and she fell to Republican state Speaker Thom Tillis by 1.7 points.  

How David Perdue Knew He Would Win

Perdue, center, speaks with reporters as he and his fellow newly elected GOP senators walk from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's office to Minority Whip John Cornyn's office in the Capitol Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The morning after he won Georgia’s open Senate seat, Republican David Perdue was asked on “Fox & Friends” how he avoided a runoff when every available poll had shown a tight race.  

It was the question of the day in the Democrats’ best pickup opportunity — where millions of dollars poured in from both sides during the final month of the contest, yet the Republican emerged with an unexpectedly large 8-point victory.  

Alaska Senate Race Called for Dan Sullivan

The AP called the Alaska Senate race for Dan Sullivan. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Associated Press called the Alaska Senate race early Wednesday for Dan Sullivan, the Republican challenger to Democratic Sen. Mark Begich.  

The decision came in the early morning hours on the East Coast, after election workers counted about 20,000 absentee ballots. An unknown number of ballots remain, but Sullivan's lead of some 8,100 votes was little changed after that significant chunk of votes was counted, the AP stated.  

The Best Congressional Campaigns of 2014

Ernst is the senator-elect from Iowa. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As a national Republican wave crested on Election Day, there were several campaigns in both parties that stood out as outstanding operations.  

The GOP expanded its House majority and obtained control of the Senate. As a result, more Republican campaigns emerged deserving of the spotlight. But there were also several Democratic operations worthy of recognition.  

Debate Coaches, Media Training, Tech: How GOP Did It

Sen.-elect Tom Cotton, on the trail in Jonesboro, Ark., was a top Republican Senate recruit. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The sweeping Republican victories were thanks to two years of internal speculation and trying to beat the Democrats "at their own game," a new GOP memo argues.  

"This did not happen by accident," read a joint memo from the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee and the National Republican Congressional Committee. "Democrats expected to win; they bragged that they would win. They would have won, had we not beat them at their own game."