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‘March’ Team Prods Youths to Change the Future (Video)

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“When you see something that is not right, you must disturb the order of things,” the Georgia Democrat implored the hundreds of kids who gathered on July 12 at the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation to hear from the visiting civil rights icon.  

Lewis, in town to promote the second installment of his autobiographical graphic novel, “March,” at Comic-Con International, spoke to a group of at-risk youths who live in a world far removed from the pop culture spectacle.

John Lewis Grooms Next-Generation Activists at Comic-Con (Video)

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The Georgia Democrat returned to the pop culture smorgasbord on July 11 to promote the second installment of his illustrated biography, “March.” Lewis co-wrote the ongoing series of graphic novels, which chronicle the life-threatening situations he often found himself in throughout the civil rights era, with right-hand man Andrew Aydin.  

The duo has been working for several years now with artist Nate Powell on a trilogy of books detailing Lewis’ ongoing crusade to vanquish inequality, an arduous journey that’s routinely visited pain and suffering upon the 15-term lawmaker’s person but has never succeeded in crushing his spirit.  

The 'Real Congresswoman From Selma' Has Her Say

Sewell likes to kid that her mother is the "real congresswoman" from the district. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Rep. Terri A. Sewell has her constituents in Alabama. Then she has "the" constituent.  

"Everyone knows [who] the real congresswoman from the 7th District is," the Alabama Democrat said. Her staff backs her up, almost in unison: "Nancy Sewell." One of the more recent examples of this dynamic at work happened as the movie "Selma," about the March 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march, was prepping for national release. Nancy Sewell thought it would be a shame if it didn't open in the city.  

This Is Today's Selma

Sewell, the congresswoman from Selma. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

SELMA, Ala. — There's "Selma" the movie, a powerful testament to the Civil Rights Era. And there's Selma the city, where vacant storefronts abound on Broad Street, the main thoroughfare leading to the Edmund Pettus Bridge.  

"No one’s going to care about home more than we do. And I have a great sense of community that was nurtured in Selma," Rep. Terri A. Sewell told CQ Roll Call during an extended interview in her district office recently. Sewell was born on Jan. 1, 1965, about two months before "Bloody Sunday," "Turnaround Tuesday" and the Selma to Montgomery March, galvanizing events of the Civil Rights Era.  

Heard on the (Goat) Hill

Thousands are expected in Alabama for the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — "Come on back March 7, 8 and 9, because there will be thousands and thousands and thousands here," Mayor Todd Strange told the crowd amassed at Goat Hill, the moniker affixed to the grounds of the state Capitol here.  

Strange was speaking to cyclists and their supporters gathered for the Feb. 21 Montgomery Bicycle Club 50th Anniversary Selma to Montgomery Bicycle Ride. He was referring to the visitors set to descend upon his fair state and the capital region to commemorate the half-century mark of the voting rights march led by Martin Luther King Jr. March 7 marks a grimmer anniversary, that of "Bloody Sunday," when now-Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Hosea Williams and marchers were beaten by state troopers and vigilantes on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma as they set out for the capital. Lewis walks the bridge every year on the anniversary, usually bringing along House colleagues and anyone else interested. Sometimes it's been a lonely walk. But this year, organizers are expected more than 100 members of Congress and thousands more regular citizens to make the trip.  

The Selma to Montgomery Bicycle Ride: Civil Rights and Bamas

(Jason Dick/CQ Roll Call)

LOWNDES COUNTY, Ala. — A partial list of things not present at the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march: A drone mini-copter, Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama," Viola Liuzzo's roadside memorial.  

As Alabama, and the country, prepares to recognize the 50th anniversary of the 50-plus mile voting rights march, as well as the tragic events such as the March 7 "Bloody Sunday," when protesters led by now-Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Hosea Williams were beaten by state troopers at Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge, the Montgomery Bicycle Club did its part by sponsoring a Feb. 21 ride traversing the march route, which is now a national historic trail. For those signing up with more ambition than ability (such as Washington-based writers) the club made sure to include some not-your-average athletic inspiration on the official ride T-shirts and jersey, courtesy of Martin Luther King Jr., who led the March 21-25 march: "If you can't fly, then run. If you can't run, then walk. If you can't walk, then crawl. But whatever you do, keep moving."