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New Hampshire Results Winnow Presidential Field

Christie goes home to reassess campaign. (Meredith Dake-O'Connor/CQ Roll Call)

And then there were seven. The results of another presidential nominating contest Tuesday night in New Hampshire brought with them another round of suspended campaigns.  

Former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina announced her plans Wednesday afternoon. That announcement came before New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie told his campaign staff he would do the same. "I've said throughout this campaign that I will not sit down and be quiet. I'm not going to start now," Fiorina said in a post on Facebook . "While I suspend my candidacy today, I will continue to travel this country and fight for those Americans who refuse to settle for the way things are and a status quo that no longer works for them."  

Huckabee and Santorum and Coffee and Pizza

Huckabee, right speaks alongside Trump, center, and Santorum, left, at a Trump event at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, on Jan. 28. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa -- The last two Republicans to win Iowa's first-in-the-nation caucuses have formed an odd fraternity: mired in the low-single digits in polling, marooned in the undercard debates and even finding themselves attending a campaign rally Jan. 28 for the frontrunner, Donald Trump.  

On Sunday, they rallied the troops with coffee and pizza. Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, who won the caucuses in 2008, assembled the faithful at Inspired Grounds Cafe, crowding into the quaint coffee shop with more than one hundred supporters and a laundry list of old friends, students, public officials and even the odd celebrity: Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, former Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif. and comedian Jimmy Labriola (Benny from "Home Improvement.") There was even a dog. It's a pretty casual place.  

GOP Presidential Candidates Make Pitches to Influential Jewish Group

Trump addresses the Republican Jewish Coalition at Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center on Thursday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Each of the 2016 White House hopefuls made their case to the Republican Jewish Coalition's Presidential Forum on Thursday why they'd be the strongest defender of America's and Israel's national security against the kind of violence seen in San Bernardino, Calif., Wednesday.

Nearly all of the candidates — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul was detained by Senate votes and never made it — argued that the incident was an example of the terrorist threat facing America and Israel and proceeded to attack President Barack Obama for not readily using the term "radical Islamic terrorism."  

Ahead of Fourth Debate, Republican Confidence in Bush Falters

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But ahead of the debate, the latest The Economist/YouGov poll shows the percentage of Republicans who think Bush could win the general election falling.  

The poll, released Tuesday, shows only 44 percent of Republicans think Bush could win the general election, regardless of who emerges as the Democratic nominee. That's down from 53 percent from just two weeks ago.  

Rubio, Paul, Graham Languish in Poll as Trump Soars

Trump, shown here with Cruz, has more than double the support of the four sitting senators running for president, plus Santorum. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

You can add Marco Rubio to the list of presidential candidates free-falling in the polls amid the summer of Trump, but he's far from the only senator having a hard time catching fire in the GOP primary.  

The CNN/ORC poll  released Thursday showed the Florida Republican fell 5 points in a month, to 3 percent, tied with the limping campaigns of Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Carly Fiorina for seventh place. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina barely registered at 1 percent, tied with former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania.  

Rick Santorum Undeterred by Debate Format

Rick Santorum speaks to reporters Monday at the Monitor Breakfast. (Courtesy of Bryan Dozier/The Christian Science Monitor).

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum is at risk of being excluded when the presidential primary debates kick off next month, but that doesn't mean he's worried about his chances in 2016.  

“I don’t really pay a whole lot of attention to things that go on this far ahead of a national vote,” the Republican White House hopeful told reporters Monday at a breakfast hosted by the Christian Science Monitor. The source of his optimism was his past performance, which he cited frequently while fielding questions: Santorum defeated two incumbents in congressional elections, once in a 1990 House race and again for Senate in 1994; he said he is “the only person in the field that has any real experience having gone toe-to-toe with the Clinton Machine” during his time in the Senate; and he carried nearly a dozen states in the 2012 GOP presidential nomination fight before dropping out in mid-April, ahead of the primary in his home state.  

Where GOP White House Hopefuls Stumped in 2014 (Chart)

Roberts, left, campaigned with Cruz, right. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When the myriad Republican presidential contenders start campaigning for 2016, their journeys might not look much different from this cycle.  

From Iowa to New Hampshire, every Republican who is even remotely considering a 2016 bid hit the trail this year to help Senate contenders. What's more, several competitive Senate races are this year conveniently in states that play host to early nominating contests in 2016.  

Iowa Senate Primary Becomes 2016 Battleground

Perry supports a candidate for Senate in Iowa. (Tom Williams/CQRoll Call File Photo)

The campaign trail in Iowa this week might look a little familiar: As Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry stump around the state, former Sen. Rick Santorum’s face is plastered on the local airwaves.  

The 2012 presidential primary is long gone, but a couple of the GOP’s future presidential hopefuls are using the Senate primary in the crucial nominating state to their advantage.  

Still No Clarity in Iowa Republican Senate Primary

Harkin's seat is an attractive pickup opportunity for Republicans. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With less than two weeks until Iowa's congressional primaries, it's still unclear whether a Republican Senate candidate can clear the 35 percent vote threshold needed to win the nomination outright.  

In an attractive pickup opportunity for national Republicans, there are four major candidates seeking the nomination for the seat of retiring Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin. The leading contenders are state Sen. Joni Ernst, who has the tacit support of the governor and earned national attention with an ad about castrating hogs, and Mark Jacobs, a self-funding former energy executive. Radio host Sam Clovis and former U.S. Attorney Matt Whitaker round out the top four.  

Potential 2016 Contenders Dominate CPAC Lineup

Rand will return to CPAC to speak on Friday. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Five Republicans who could share a presidential primary debate stage next year will all deliver speeches by lunchtime at today's start of the Conservative Political Action Conference.  

Potential 2016 White House contenders, elected officials and conservative darlings are lining up over the next few days to address thousands of conservative activists descending on the nation's capital for the annual retreat.