polling

What I Learned About Polling From a Georgia House Survey
IVR technology no longer limited by number of candidates on the ballot

An automated survey showed Democrat Jon Ossoff leading the pack in the race to replace former Georgia Republican Rep. Tom Price. (Photo by Dustin Chambers, Courtesy Jon Ossoff for Congress)

I was initially skeptical of a recently released poll in the special election for Georgia’s 6th District, not because it utilized Interactive Voice Response, or IVR, technology or because it was conducted by a GOP-friendly firm or because a Democratic candidate was leading in a Republican-leaning district. But it only gave respondents the option to choose from less than half of the candidates, proving the limits of automated polling, or so I thought.

The March 15-16 automated survey conducted by Clout Research for zpolitics showed Democrat Jon Ossoff leading with 41 percent followed by two Republicans: former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel and wealthy businessman Bob Gray, who had 16 percent each. Former state Sen. Judson Hill and three other Republicans combined for nearly 17 percent while former Democratic state Sen. Ron Slotin received 3 percent.

Poll: Most Young Americans Disapprove of Trump
Slim majority of white voters support him, most other racial and ethnic groups don’t

A slim majority of young whites say Donald Trump’s presidency is a legitimate one, but a majority of them don’t approve of his job performance. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new poll shows that a majority of young Americans don’t see Donald Trump as a legitimate president and most disapprove of his performance so far.

Those are the results from GenForward, a poll of young adults between ages 18 to 30 conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago and Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, The Associated Press reported.

Poll: Majority Says Sessions Should Resign for Lying Under Oath
And majority think illegal immigrants should stay

Majority of voters feel that Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, lied in his hearing before the Sente Judiciary Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A slight majority in a new poll say that Attorney General Jeff Sessions lied at his confirmation hearings and should resign.

The Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday found that 52 percent of the voters think Sessions lied under oath, and 51 percent feel he should resign, while 40 percent and 42 percent of respondents, respectively, felt the opposite.

Survey: Democratic Aides Doubt Senate Can Block SCOTUS Nominee
Staffers overwhelmingly expect Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed

Judge Neil Gorsuch meets with North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp in her Hart building office on Feb. 8. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Liberal advocacy groups are spending lots of time and money organizing for what they hope will be a big fight over President Donald Trump’s choice to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch.

They might be disheartened to learn that Democratic congressional aides don’t think they can block him.

Trump Taking a Bite Out of the Big Apple’s Police Budget
President’s New York protection costs estimated at $300,000 a day

New York Rep. Dan Donovan wants to see New York City law enforcement reimbursed for extra expenses when President Donald Trump is in the Big Apple. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A New York Republican is adding his name to the growing list of lawmakers who want to see local law enforcement reimbursed for the costs associated with protecting President Donald Trump when he isn’t at the White House. 

Rep. Dan Donovan on Tuesday asked the House Commerce-Justice-Science Appropriations Subcommittee to allocate additional money for the city of New York in the subcommittee’s fiscal 2018 spending bill. Donovan said the $7 million added to a continuing resolution in December does not come close to the actual costs incurred by the city to protect Trump and his family.

Hints of a ‘Shop-’Til-You-Drop’ Presidency
Trump delivers first major deficits-don’t-matter speech in modern GOP history

President Donald Trump greets Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday following his joint session address, which strikingly omitted a full-throated sermon on the dangers of increased national debt, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was the most perplexing speech of Donald Trump’s career. 

Watching the 45th president deliver an address to Congress mercifully free of vitriolic attacks and short on egocentric nonsense prompted the obvious question: In what storeroom at Mar-a-Lago have they been hiding this version of Donald Trump?

Georgia Democrat Picks Up Progressive Endorsement
End Citizens United backs Jon Ossoff in special election

Democrat Jon Ossoff is one of 18 candidates vying for Georgia’s 6th District seat. (Courtesy Jon Ossoff for Congress Facebook page)

End Citizens United, a liberal political action committee, is throwing its weight behind Democrat Jon Ossoff in the race to replace Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price in Georgia’s 6th District. 

The endorsement is the latest sign that Democrats want to make a play for the district, which President Donald Trump carried by less than 2 points last fall, and that Ossoff is their top candidate. 

Poll: More Say Trump’s Immigration Order Increases National Security
But opinion divided whether the president's policy will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism

A new poll shows public opinion is divided over President Donald Trump's executive action on immigration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most Americans think President Donald Trump’s travel ban order will make the U.S. more secure, although not everyone considers his policies will keep the U.S. safe from terrorism, a new poll shows.

Forty-three percent of those polled said they think Trump’s executive order imposing a ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries will increase national security, 24 percent said it will cause a decrease, and 15 percent said it will have no effect. The remaining 18 percent said they weren’t sure, according to a Economist/YouGov poll released Wednesday.

Report Shows ‘Untapped Power’ of Constituent Advocacy
Showing the local effects of legislation can better influence lawmakers

People react to Rep. Jason Chaffetz as he speaks during a town hall meeting at Brighton High School, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, in Cottonwood Heights, Utah. Hundreds of people lined up early for the town hall with Chaffetz on Thursday evening, many holding signs criticizing the congressman's push to repeal the newly-named Bears Ears National Monument in southern Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

New Poll Shows Unease With ‘Nuclear Option’ for Supreme Court Pick
Survey conducted largely before Trump announced his choice

Tenth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge — and now Supreme Court nominee — Neil Gorsuch delivers prepared remarks before a group of attorneys in Denver in January. (David Zalubowski/AP Photo)

A new poll commissioned by progressive groups has found that nearly seven in 10 voters say they’re against using the “nuclear option” to confirm a Supreme Court justice.

The survey was conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research for NARAL, Every Voice and End Citizens United, and shared first with Roll Call. It asked about the Senate Democrats’ insistence that the current nominee be confirmed with a supermajority of at least 60 votes.