polling

Poll: Majority Disapprove of Trump in Rust Belt States That Helped Elect Him
But support stays strong among those who supported him last year

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence held a “Make America Great Again Rally” in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to celebrate their first 100 days in office. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

A new poll shows a majority in three Rust Belt states that helped propel Donald Trump to the White House disapprove of the job he’s doing.

The Marist/NBC News poll released Monday found 55 percent of residents in Michigan disapprove of Trump’s job performance while 36 percent said they approve. In Pennsylvania, 52 percent say they disapprove while 33 percent approve. And in Wisconsin, Trump’s disapproval rate was at 56 while approval was 33.

Poll: Majority of Americans Say Trump’s Charlottesville Response ‘Not Strong Enough’
Two-thirds of respondents want a domestic terrorism investigation

A majority of Americans see President Donald Trump’s response to the racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., as inadequate. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A majority of Americans in a new poll say President Donald Trump’s response to the violence that broke out a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia was “not strong enough.”

Fifty-two percent of respondents in the NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll said Trump’s response should have been stronger, while 27 percent said it was strong enough.

Trump Approval Rating Dips to Lowest Point of Presidency
Poll shows drop in support for president among Republicans from June to August

President Donald Trump's approval ratings among Republicans fell from 91 percent in June to 79 percent in a poll released Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s approval rating has sunk to its lowest point since he took office, with only 35 percent of Americans saying they viewed the job he’s done favorably, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The new Marist poll found that 55 percent disapprove of Trump after seven months on the job.

‘Kid Rock’ May Be Ineligible for Michigan Ballot
Elections bureau would decide whether Robert Ritchie can use stage name

A truck with a Kid Rock for Senate decal was seen on a Virginia highway earlier this month. (Bridget Bowman/CQ Roll Call)

Robert Ritchie may end up challenging Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow in Michigan next year, but his stage name, Kid Rock, may not be allowed to appear on the ballot.

Kid Rock is a household name to Americans under the age of 50, and voters might be attracted to vote for him, as a middle finger to the political establishment. But it’s not immediately clear whether his famous stage name would appear on the ballot or if he’d be required to run under his less-known given name. 

Poll: 78 Percent of Utahns Want Hatch to Retire

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, initially said after his 2012 re-election that he would not run again but is reconsidering that decision. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new poll shows an overwhelming majority of Utahns want Republican Sen. Orrin Hatchto retire after his current term ends in 2019.

The poll was conducted by the Salt Lake Tribune and the University of Utah’s Hinckley Institute of Politics.

White House Talks Tax Outreach, but Senators Guarded
Legislative director outlines ambitious timetable

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short, left, here with Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso last week, has hopes for a bipartisan tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll)

The White House sees Democrats up for re-election in states President Donald Trump won as possible partners in their effort to overhaul the tax code, but Senate Republicans appear less optimistic about the chances of a bipartisan bill.

White House legislative director Marc Short said Monday the White House is not wed to using the often partisan reconciliation process to advance a tax overhaul, though senators were hesitant to rule out that procedural tool.

Poll: Americans Want to Move On From Obamacare Repeal
Reuters/Ipsos poll shows support for health law splits down party lines

A new Retuers/Ipsos poll found that only 29 percent of Americans said health care reform was their top priority. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A majority of Americans want members of Congress to ditch health care reform efforts and focus their attention elsewhere, according to a Reuters/Iposos poll conducted after the Senate Republicans’ effort crashed early Friday.

The new poll shows that nearly two-thirds of Americans want to keep the 2010 health care law, either “entirely as is” or after reforming “problem areas.” This was an increase from January, when just over half of Americans agreed with that sentiment.

Super PAC Hopes to Move Republicans to Work With Democrats
Poll shows most voters want Obamacare improved, not scrapped

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., will be a prime target for Democrats for voting to repeal the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In the wake of the failed Republican efforts to pass their health care bill, a Democratic super PAC is hoping to show Republicans that their constituents want them to support improving the 2010 health care law and their vote to repeal it will cost them.

Priorities USA Action hosted a media call showing that most voters and people who voted for President Donald Trump want Republicans to work with Democrats to improve the law.

Americans Dubious of GOP Health Care Reform, Poll Finds
GOP operatives say party leaders must press on

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Majority Whip John Cornyn, R-Texas, are trying to push a health care overhaul forward. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A new poll found a third of Americans think a GOP health care policy would marginally affect their health care. Just 15 percent think their coverage would improve. So why are Republicans hellbent on dismantling the 2010 health care law before the August recess?

Nine out of every 10 respondents to a new Economist/YouGov poll agreed health care is an issue that is at least “somewhat important,” with seven out of 10 saying health care was “very important.”

Former GOP Senator Warns ‘No Do-Overs’ on Health Care
David Durenberger says ‘no’ is only ‘defensible vote’

Former Minnesota Sen. David Durenberger in a Monday op-ed warned Republican lawmakers against repealing the 2010 health care law. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Minnesota Republican Sen. David Durenberger took aim Monday at current GOP senators for attempting to ram through a motion to proceed on their controversial bill to dismantle the 2010 health care law.

In a USA Today op-ed, Durenberger laid out the normal procedures for deliberating on a bill with ramifications for millions of Americans of this magnitude: “You ask questions. You hold hearings. You understand what it would mean to your constituents. You listen to those who know the system. And when it doesn’t add up, you vote against it.”