podcasts

That ’70s Show: Biden edition
Political Theater, Episode 93

Former Vice President Joe Biden arrives for his 2020 campaign kickoff rally at the Eakins Oval in Philadelphia on May 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Say this for the Democratic presidential field: Voters certainly have choices. From former vice presidents to tech entrepreneurs, from senators to mayors, from wizened veterans to young upstarts.

Out of this crowded roster, Joe Biden is arguably the most recognizable. The affable No. 2 to President Barack Obama and longtime former senator is among the most known political quantities.

Trump upends bipartisan consensus on homelessness
CQ On Congress, Episode 170

Henry Palmer, a homeless man living in one of the tents near Union Station in Washington, sweeps his area as he waits for DC city workers to load his belongings into a truck in 2016. The city ordered the small tent city, just blocks from the U.S. Capitol, removed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump has challenged the idea, pioneered in George W. Bush’s administration, that the best, and most cost-effective way to end homelessness is to offer people living on the streets homes, no strings attached, and to service their needs in a home setting.

A new report from the president’s Council of Economic Advisers says that has neither reduced homelessness, nor lowered costs. Richard Cho, who served in top positions at the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness during the Obama administration and now heads the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, joins the program this week to discuss how “Housing First” has worked and how it hasn’t.

Fintech Beat explores the ABC's of fintech investing
Fintech Beat, Ep. 19

Stock market data growth chart graph investment finance analysis fintech financial district

Why partisan spending allocations spell trouble for the appropriations process
CQ Budget, Episode 127

From left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Sens. Todd Young, R-Ind., and John Thune, R-S.D., conduct a news conference after the Senate Policy Luncheons in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After months of delay, Senate appropriators finally got to work on their spending bills for the new fiscal year, which begins in just two weeks. But it was a slower start than lawmakers had hoped for, and unlike last year’s effort, it was deeply partisan. The Appropriations Committee approved its overall spending limits for each of its 12 bills, but it wasn’t pretty. Where do they go from here? Listen here.

E-cigarette deaths prompt bipartisan response

Signs in the window of the Smoke Depot advertise electronic cigarettes and pods by Juul, the nation's largest maker of e-cigarette products, on Sept. 13, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

K Street doesn’t need just any old retired lawmakers
Political Theater, Episode 92

Gone are the days when retired lawmakers had a glide path to K Street and trade association gigs. These days, lawmakers need to show more than just a résumé to have a lucrative career in advocacy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lobbying firms on K Street and trade associations used to be a sure bet for retiring members of Congress. Not anymore.

Julian Ha, a recruiter on K Street and an adviser to FiscalNote, the company that owns CQ Roll Call, joins the podcast along with CQ Roll Call senior writer Kate Ackley to talk about the current state of lobbying positions for former lawmakers.

Can Congress avoid a shutdown?
CQ Budget, Episode 126

Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., left, and Roy Blunt, R-Mon., are seen during a Senate Appropriations Committee markup in June. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Congress returns for a bleak fall session
CQ on Congress, Episode 168

Congress is due to return from August recess on Sept. 9.  (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In our podcast, we’re gone to Carolina
Political Theater, Episode 91

Dan McCready, the Democratic candidate in North Carolina’s 9th District, campaigns in Pembroke, N.C., on Aug. 10. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s September 2019, but we’re only just now wrapping up the 2018 election. Voters in North Carolina’s 9th District will finish it all off on when they decide on Sept. 10 whether Democrat Dan McCready or Republican Dan Bishop will represent them in Congress. 

The lagging special election was necessary because the North Carolina State Board of Elections threw out last fall’s initial results because of election fraud tied to the Republican effort and its nominee, Mark Harris. 

Friction over diverted disaster aid ahead of Hurricane Dorian
CQ Budget, Episode 125

Barriers at the Rio Grande Valley sector of the border. (Photo by Jinitzail Hernández/CQ Roll Call)