podcasts

Get used to it: Trumpism without Trump
Political Theater, Episode 82

From left, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., conduct a news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center responding to negative comments by President Trump that were directed at the freshmen House Democrats. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Political scientist Shadi Hamid remembers growing up in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, the son of Egyptian immigrants. In what was then a solidly Republican enclave of the Philadelphia suburbs, his parents and many of his Muslim neighbors voted for George W. Bush.

That seems like a long time ago, as that critical swing area of Philly has swung increasingly Democratic, along with most of America’s Muslims. So why would President Donald Trump spend so much time attacking Muslims and, in particular, a high-profile group of Democratic congresswomen, “The Squad,” that has two Muslim members, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota and Rashida Tlaib? Well, because attacking your opponents across racial lines, and defining them as a sinister other, is a basic tenet of Trumpism, and the president and many of his Republican allies are all in. 

Fintech industry leaders tackle the great decentralization debate
Fintech Beat podcast, Episode 10

Disagreements over common terms and jargon are dominating the world of fintech. (Lidiia Moor/iStock)

A core challenge when it comes to fintech is the so-called blurred lines — when the definition of a word invokes different answers. The biggest blurring of all happens with the concept of decentralization — what it means, what it looks like, and why regulators care.

Debt limit talks pick up pace and tax credit bonanza
CQ Budget podcast, Episode 118

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is supporting congressional efforts to raise the debt limit before the summer recess. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With new warnings that the U.S. could run out of money to meet its obligations, Congress and the Trump administration are racing to raise the debt limit before lawmakers head home for August, says CQ Roll Call’s appropriations reporter Jennifer Shutt. And tax reporter Doug Sword explains how oil refiners could get up to a $10 billion windfall with an expired tax credit unless Congress intervenes.

Immigrant raids could lead to more family separations
CQ on Congress, Episode 161

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., is one of the lawmakers voicing concerns about the conditions in migrant detention centers. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration says it will round up undocumented immigrants who have missed a court date in an effort to deter others migrants from seeking refuge in the United States. But raids could exacerbate family separations, report CQ Roll Call’s Tanvi Misra and Jinitzail Hernandez, who just returned from visiting one of the largest migrant detention centers in Homestead, Fla., where the government is holding 2,000 teenage immigrants.

Harry Reid in winter: Still grappling, and dabbling, in politics
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 81

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid speaks with CQ Roll Call about Nevada politics, the presidential race and baseball in his office at the Bellagio in Las Vegas on July 2. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Harry Reid might have retired from the Senate in 2017 and started battling cancer a year later, but the former Senate Democratic leader doesn’t seem to be the retiring type, especially when it comes to Nevada politics.

“I’m a political junkie, to say the least,” he tells our own Niels Lesniewski in a wide-ranging interview in Las Vegas that we’ve excerpted for this edition of the Political Theater podcast.

How Facebook's new cryptocurrency could reshape the global economy
Fintech Beat podcast, Episode 9

Facebook's announcement that they are launching a new cryptocurrency has created a stir in the world of financial technology . (Jack Taylor/Getty Images file photo)

Why there's no Senate spending plan as deadline nears
CQ Budget podcast, Episode 117

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., left, and Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., are two key players in how the chamber will deal with fiscal year 2020 spending. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Assessing the trade talks with China
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 160

President Donald Trump announced that no new tariffs will be imposed on Chinese imports during the U.S.-China trade talks. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

In this episode of CQ on Congress, former U.S. trade negotiator Wendy Cutler explains what each side of the U.S.-China trade talks is looking to gain. Then trade economist Christine McDaniel walks us through how some U.S. companies are coping with the tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. And CQ Roll Call's trade reporter Mark Bocchetti discusses the process that allows U.S. companies to seek exclusions from the tariffs.

‘Mike Wallace Is Here’ shows how we got here
Political Theater podcast, Episode 80

“Mike Wallace Is Here” documents the career of the legendary journalist — as well as his role in creating the political and news world we live in now. (Bryan Bedder/Getty Images file photo)

The new film “Mike Wallace Is Here” shows how legendary journalist Mike Wallace pioneered holding the powerful accountable, be they politicians, celebrities or real estate developers. But today’s world is one where journalists are in danger and the credibility of its practitioners is constantly called into question. What happened?

On the latest Political Theater podcast, the documentary’s director, Avi Belkin, discusses the arc of Wallace’s career and where things started to shift. In the course of compiling the movie — from thousands of hours of archival footage from CBS’ “60 Minutes” program that made Wallace a star — Belkin says he noticed just how much richer and articulate conversation was among journalists and the subjects they covered. And he argues that the audience bears a responsibility in all this too. 

Financial Services bill loaded with hot-button issues may signal trouble ahead
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 116

Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., succeeded in passing a Motion to Recommit that supported sanctions against Iran. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats passed the Financial Services spending bill that includes some controversial provisions, says CQ Roll Call’s banking reporter Jim Saksa. Those include blocking money for a border wall, increasing funding to enforce sanctions on Iran and allowing the District of Columbia to fund abortions.