paul-ryan

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

Georgia Runoff Will Test Both Parties’ Political Alliances
Parties gearing up for expensive fight in Georgia's 6th District

Karen Handel, seen her in 2014, is uniting the GOP behind her after finishing second in Tuesday’s 18-candidate primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

ALPHARETTA, Ga. — For a brief moment, Georgia’s 6th District was quiet.

Out-of-state journalists who flooded this suburban battleground headed for the airport Wednesday morning. After a very late Tuesday night, Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel held no public events in the district the next day. Instead, they gave interviews on cable TV — a reflection of how nationalized this race has become. 

Poll: Ryan Is Even Less Popular Than Trump
Only 29 percent of Americans approve of speaker’s performance

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan holds a lower job approval rating than President Donald Trump, according to a Pew Research Center study. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is very unpopular, but an even smaller percentage of Americans approves of the job House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is doing, a new poll shows.

The Pew Research Center survey released Monday shows that just 29 percent of Americans approve of Ryan’s performance. In contrast, 39 percent approve of Trump, whose approval ratings rank among the lowest of recent presidents at this point in their terms.

Funding Deadline Tests GOP Strategy
Republicans hoped for more under Trump, but still need Democrats’ help

From left, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan meet for a working lunch at the White House on March 1. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

When Republicans kicked the fiscal 2017 spending deadline into April last December, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said they’d rather negotiate with incoming GOP President Donald Trump than the outgoing Democratic one.

But now, congressional Republicans are talking about largely ignoring requests from the White House as they negotiate with Democrats over a spending bill to take the government off autopilot for the remaining five months of the fiscal year.

Freedom Caucus Member’s Book Slams Money-Obsessed Politicians
In ‘Drain the Swamp,’ Ken Buck also takes aim at NRCC’s ‘pay-to-play’ culture

Colorado Rep. Ken Buck attributes criticism of the House Freedom Caucus to “just plain jealousy.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Freedom Caucus member Ken Buck describes a money-hungry, lobbyist-influenced Republican leadership in his first book “Drain the Swamp” but he told CQ Roll Call that life is better for the hard-line conservative faction under Speaker Paul D. Ryan.

The Colorado Republican, now in his second term, has few kind words in his book released this week for Ryan’s predecessor, Ohio’s John A. Boehner, whom conservative lawmakers worked to oust. Boehner has since set up a practice at the K Street firm Squire Patton Boggs, and his spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Opinion: Would Trump Nuke Congressional Budget Rules?
They could stand in the way of president’s infrastructure plans

President Donald Trump may feel that he has the credibility to shatter the Republican consensus on budgetary issues now that his nominee has joined the Supreme Court, Walter Shapiro writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If real life resembled apocalyptic 1950s movies, the triggering of the nuclear option would have left a radioactive cloud all over North America and Europe. And the remnants of humanity would be hunkering down in Australia, calculating how long it would take for the deadly wind currents to reach that far south.

Instead, when the Senate went nuclear, Neil Gorsuch was elevated to the Supreme Court and Congress went home for recess without needing Geiger counters or fallout shelters. In fact, amid the thrill-a-minute gyrations of the Donald Trump White House, the nuclear option is already half-forgotten as all punditry is now raining down on the cruise missile strike in Syria.

K Street Offers Five Tips for Tax Overhaul
Tip #2: Get the Freedom Caucus involved

Some K Street insiders say President Donald Trump’s salesman skills may be key to the success of a tax code overhaul. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional Republicans and the White House can’t gloss over the collapse of their first signature measure — the 2010 health care law repeal and replace effort — but veteran lobbyists see cautionary tales in that mess for the next major overhaul.

A comprehensive revamp of the nation’s tax laws may avoid the health care bill’s fate, if lawmakers and administration officials take note of five lessons learned by K Street.

The Elephant on the CPAC Stage

A cardboard cutout of Trump stands in the CPAC Hub room. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

FORT WASHINGTON, Md. — The last two Republican presidential nominees forcefully denounced Donald Trump on Thursday, but at one of the largest conservative confabs of the year, the GOP front-runner's name hardly came up.  

In fact, explicit references to the presidential race were few and far between at the first day of speeches at the Conservative Political Action Conference.  

D.C. Mayor One of Ryan's State of the Union Guests

Bowser will be one of Ryan's guests at the State of the Union. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser will attend the State of the Union Tuesday as one of Speaker Paul D. Ryan's guests, according to her spokesman. Bowser spokesman Michael Czin told Roll Call that Bowser would be seated in the gallery as one of the Wisconsin Republican's guests Tuesday evening, but could not speak to why Ryan chose to invite Bowser. Czin did say their office has been in regular contact with Ryan's office since he was elected speaker in October.  

"We'll continue to work with members of both sides of the aisle to do what's in the best interest of District residents," Czin said.  

Ryan Gets High Marks for First Big Showdown

Ryan is planning ahead for 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

John A. Boehner's last days as speaker in October were spent, as he said, cleaning out the barn, or cutting legislative deals to help his successor, Paul D. Ryan, get off to a good start.  

Now that Ryan is close to passing his first real test as speaker by finishing up 2015's legislative business, the Wisconsin Republican is laying the groundwork to keep things tidy in 2016.