outside-groups

Photos From the Science March, on Earth Day
Protesters came to D.C. on Saturday in support of science

Marchers — including Bill Nye the Science Guy, at center — lead the March for Science down Constitution Avenue in Washington on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Thousands of pro-science and environmental activists rallied on the National Mall before marching toward the Capitol on Saturday, the 47th observation of Earth Day. The march in Washington was accompanied by other science marches across the U.S. and world. It was organized to show support for the scientific community at a time when its members, and supporters, say they feel threatened by the policies and potential policies of President Donald Trump.

GOP Super PAC Ties Montana's Rob Quist to Nancy Pelosi
Congressional Leadership Fund begins $800,000 media campaign

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As national attention turns to the special election in Montana, the super PAC backed by House GOP leadership is deploying House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in a new TV attack on Democratic nominee Rob Quist. 

The ad, which will debut Friday on broadcast and cable, marks the start of an $800,000 media buy from Congressional Leadership Fund. The super PAC ran its first TV ad against Quist last month, using many of the same attacks.  

Rising Stars 2017: Advocates
On the front lines in a new era

Seven advocates made the CQ Roll Call’s list of Rising Stars of 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

All this week, CQ Roll Call has been looking at 17 Rising Stars of 2017 — people who will now wield power and influence in a Washington that has been turned upside down by the presidency of Donald Trump.

Some of the names are familiar, others have recently burst on the scene. They include members of Congress, congressional and administration staffers, and advocates.

Georgia Runoff Will Test Both Parties’ Political Alliances
Parties gearing up for expensive fight in Georgia's 6th District

Karen Handel, seen her in 2014, is uniting the GOP behind her after finishing second in Tuesday’s 18-candidate primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

ALPHARETTA, Ga. — For a brief moment, Georgia’s 6th District was quiet.

Out-of-state journalists who flooded this suburban battleground headed for the airport Wednesday morning. After a very late Tuesday night, Democrat Jon Ossoff and Republican Karen Handel held no public events in the district the next day. Instead, they gave interviews on cable TV — a reflection of how nationalized this race has become. 

D.C. Home Rule Advocates to Continue Fight After Chaffetz Retirement Announcement
Others on Oversight Committee may be targeted next

Golf balls with Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s face imprinted on them were a party favor at the Americans for Self-Rule PAC launch party this week. (Courtesy Lynette Craig)

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s announcement that he will retire from Congress at the end of 2018 has made some folks in Washington, D.C., very happy.

Advocates for District of Columbia sovereignty see Chaffetz, the chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, as one of their biggest tormentors. The Republican lawmaker especially riled local groups to action by attempting to exercise the committee’s authority to overturn D.C. laws under the Home Rule Act, long a sore spot for District residents.

Wittman Answers Questions at Public Forum, Constituents Hold Mock Town Hall
Republican congressman says he favors smaller-scale meetings over massive town halls

Rep. Rob Wittman, R-Va., leaves a meeting of the Stafford County Board of Supervisors in Stafford, Va., on April 18, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

STAFFORD, Va. — Rep. Rob Wittman provided an update on congressional affairs to the local governing body here Tuesday evening. It was his fifth constituent meeting of the day.

Meanwhile, just over 30 miles northwest in Nokesville, Virginia, citizens held a mock town hall to discuss the congressman’s voting record.

BunnyPAC Hopes to Thump Duncan Hunter on Rabbitgate
Hunter’s people say it’s pure politics

Reps. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., faces a federal investigation into campaign spending. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A political action committee is relying on a rabbit to help California Rep. Duncan Hunter hop out of Congress.

BunnyPAC was started by Shawn VanDiver, a Navy veteran who runs his own consulting firm in San Diego. It is rooted in allegations that Hunter used campaign money for personal expenses, including paying for airline fare for the family’s pet rabbit.

Among 18 Georgia Candidates, One Competitive Woman
Karen Handel could take possible runoff slot in special election

Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel has lost her last two bids for higher office, but now could be poised to finish in the top two Tuesday night and advance to a runoff for the open 6th District seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

No campaign push in Georgia’s 6th District is complete without a stop at Rhea’s, an old-fashioned burger joint.

“If you want to win, you gotta have Jimmy’s help,” said Republican candidate Karen Handel, nodding to the owner who was flipping burgers behind the counter at the Roswell location Monday afternoon. 

All Eyes on Turnout in Georgia Special Election
Jon Ossoff thinks outright victory on Tuesday is ‘within reach’

Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff speaks to campaign volunteers Monday before they head out to canvass the 6th District, one day before the special election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ROSWELL, Ga. — Morning rain showers with scattered afternoon thunderstorms. That’s the forecast for Election Day in the House district that’s set for one of the most closely watched special elections ever. 

In the final hours of the race to fill Georgia’s 6th District seat, only one thing mattered to the leading candidates: turnout. 

Opinion: Why Congress Should Value, and Keep, AmeriCorps
The national service program efficiently lifts America’s most needy schoolchildren

Without AmeriCorps, roughly 14.5 million children currently living in families strained by poverty would fall further behind, Dale Erquiaga writes. (Courtesy AmeriCorps Facebook page)

When the new administration’s budget blueprint arrived last month, the math was, to say the least, unsettling. The EPA and State Department would see their budgets slashed by nearly one-third, Agriculture and Labor by 21 percent and the Education Department — which affects my area of work and interest — would take about a 13 percent hit.

The severe proposals sparked an intense and important national debate that continues today. Largely lost in the back and forth, however, has been the proposals affecting AmeriCorps, a program that since its inception has been a model for how to efficiently and effectively improve millions of lives. The Corporation for National and Community Service, or CNCS, which has administered AmeriCorps and other volunteer service programs for a quarter-century, has undoubtedly changed America for the better. But in the proposed budget, CNCS, and with it AmeriCorps, would be eliminated.