nationwide

How Many Gas Pipelines Do We Need?
As demand for natural gas rises, so do questions about pipeline capacity

A natural gas pipeline yard is shown beyond a fence in Skokie, Ill., in this 2003 photo. (Tim Boyle/Getty Images file photo)

BY JACKIE TOTH

When coal-fired and nuclear power plants are retired, they’re usually replaced not by new renewable technologies like solar or wind, but with power plants fueled by natural gas.

3 Ways Republicans Can Block Roy Moore From the Senate
GOP senators have called on their Alabama nominee to step aside

Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans looking to block Roy Moore from becoming a senator are exploring a number of options, though the window is closing with the Alabama Senate race just four weeks away.

After The Washington Post reported that four women described sexual advances from Moore, when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s, GOP leaders called on the candidate to quit if the allegations were true. Another accuser came forward Monday to say Moore sexually assaulted her. 

Capitol Ink | Good Old Days

Capitol-Ink-11-14-17

Trump on Course for Least Diverse Judicial Picks Since Reagan
President’s nominees have been overwhelmingly white and male

Greg Katsas was nominated by President Donald Trump for a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He is seen here during his confirmation hearing last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s picks for federal judgeships reflect a strikingly different direction when it comes to diversity on the bench — it is the most white and male group of nominees in recent history.

So far, 91 percent of Trump’s 58 judicial nominees for district and appeals courts are white, a pace that would make his appointees the least diverse since the Reagan administration, according to statistics compiled by the liberal advocacy group Alliance for Justice. Only 19 percent of his picks are women, a pace that would make his appointees the most male since the George H.W. Bush administration.

Opinion: For the Republicans, Less Is (Roy) Moore
McConnell said it: Every day is a Maalox moment for the GOP

Republican senators started to abandon Alabama Senate GOP nominee Roy Moore after The Washington Post published allegations of sexual misconduct with underage women. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The implosion of the Senate candidacy of Roy Moore brings to mind the title of an early Spike Lee movie: “Do the Right Thing.”

After Moore romped home in the Alabama Senate primary runoff in late September, the national Republican Party could have shunned him for many valid reasons. There was Moore’s un-American belief that Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress; his wackadoodle claim that Sharia law governed communities in Indiana and Illinois; and his defiance of the law that twice led to his removal from Alabama’s Supreme Court.

NRSC Cuts Ties With Roy Moore Fundraising Committee
GOP’s first tangible step of distancing itself from Alabama Senate candidate

Alabama Republican Roy Moore’s campaign for Senate has been rocked by sexual misconduct allegations. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The National Republican Senatorial Committee has been removed from a joint fundraising committee with Roy Moore’s Alabama Senate campaign, a sign party leadership is distancing itself from Moore. 

The move, first reported by The Daily Beast, is the first tangible step the party has taken to cut ties with the former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. The joint fundraising committee, which would allow donors to make one large campaign contribution rather than several smaller ones, was first set up between the NRSC, the Moore campaign, the Republican National Committee, and the Alabama Republican Party in October. 

Capitol Ink | Trump Tunnel

Capitol-Ink-11-09-17

9 Thoughts After Democrats’ Big Wins in Virginia
As with early GOP victories, resist reading too much into Tuesday’s results

A supporter of Democrat Ralph Northam celebrates Tuesday at an election night rally in Fairfax, Va., as early projections pointed to a Northam victory in the Virginia gubernatorial election. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Everyone take a deep breath. We’re all starving for tangible election results and now we have them. But just as earlier Republican wins in congressional special elections this year are no guarantee the party will have a good 2018, losses on Tuesday night don’t necessarily tell us a Democratic wave in the House has developed.

Democrats had to win the governorship in Virginia, and they did. After coming up short in every House special election this year in districts President Donald Trump carried last fall, Democrats didn’t have an excuse to lose a state that Hillary Clinton won by more than 5 points. And Ralph Northam responded with a resounding victory for Democrats. That being said, the win maintains the status quo considering Virginia already has a Democratic governor.

Supreme Court to Mull Congressional Power in Lawsuits
Michigan case could reshape Congress’ power to affect court outcomes

The Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday about a law that required federal courts to dismiss lawsuits related to a Michigan land tract. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday in a case that questions whether Congress crossed a line by telling federal courts what to do with challenges to a Michigan land tract and its use as a Native American casino.

It will be the second time in two years the justices will consider a case that could reshape Congress’ power to use legislation to affect the outcome of specific ongoing court cases.

Please Don’t Call It a Push Poll: Transgender Edition
Survey either measures public opinion or it doesn’t

Virginia state House candidate Danica Roem complained about a “push poll” run against her last month. (Courtesy Danica Roem for Delegate/Facebook)

Danica Roem and Bob Marshall are facing off in an unusually high-profile race for the Virginia House of Delegates — Roem, a transgender Democrat, is challenging Marshall, a conservative Republican. The race reached a new level in the final weeks when allegations of a so-called push poll came to light.

My longtime colleague Stuart Rothenberg jokes that there are some columns that need to be written over and over again. The debate over push polls is one of those topics.