nancy-pelosi

100 Years of Women: Here's How Many Have Served in Congress
A look at the century since Montana's Jeannette Rankin joined the House

Reps. Nancy Johnson, R-Conn., right, and Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, with the portrait of Jeannette Rankin of Montana, who was the first woman elected to Congress in 1916, taking office in 1917. An unveiling ceremony for her portrait is shown in this file photo in the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress on Sept. 29, 2005. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

When women’s rights advocate Jeannette Rankin, a Montana Republican, was elected to the House of Representatives a century ago, she noted, “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.”

Rankin took office in 1917 — a member of the 65th Congress. Since that time, 281 women have been elected full voting members of the House and 50 have become senators. 

Opinion: No Need to Be Up in Arms Over House Dress Code
Proper attire shows respect for institution, its people and work being done

As recent speakers, Paul D. Ryan and Nancy Pelosi have been responsible for enforcing rules governing attire in and around the House floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Thank God for the House dress code: If it were up to the general public, the rules might require reporters to be attired in sackcloth and ashes or tar and feathers.

By now, you’ve probably heard that Speaker Paul Ryan is taking heat because a female reporter was kicked out of the area adjacent to the House floor — the Speaker’s Lobby — when her outfit didn’t meet the standards laid out in the House rules. Apparently, like Michelle Obama and Melania Trump, she dared to bare arms.

How House Leaders Spend Independence Day Recess
McCarthy, Hoyer attend Capitol Fourth concert, Ryan participates in parades back home

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, pictured prepping for the 2017 inauguration, are spending most of the Independence Day recess in their districts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The No. 2 House Republican and Democratic leaders spent Independence Day in Washington at the Capitol Fourth celebration, while the top House leaders were participating in parades and spending time with family.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan participated in two parades this July Fourth, in Oak Creek and Franklin in Wisconsin, and he will be touring local businesses in his 1st District over the next couple of days, his spokesman Brendan Buck said. 

What’s Ohio’s Tim Ryan Up To?
Youngstown Democrat in media spotlight again — and on the trail

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan greets voters in South Carolina's 5th District, where he campaigned earlier this month for Democratic candidate Archie Parnell. (Simone Pathé/CQ Roll Call)

The weekend before South Carolina’s special election, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan had been thrown into the lion’s den — “literally,” he joked. 

As a surrogate for an under-the-radar Democratic candidate in the 5th District race, the congressman from Youngstown, Ohio, was addressing a Lions Club candidate forum in a gated community south of Charlotte, North Carolina, where the room was mostly white, elderly and Republican.

Podcast: McConnell’s Health Care Seesaw
The Big Story, Episode 60

From left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., after announcing there would be no vote on the health care bill this week. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate majority leader hasn’t abandoned hope of finding 50 votes for the year’s top GOP priority. But postponement over the July Fourth break won’t make it easier to bridge the gap between those focused on Obamacare’s repeal and those worried about too stingy a replacement, Roll Call’s Niels Lesniewski and David Hawkings explain.

Show Notes:

Six Who Could Succeed Pelosi — Someday
Ouster talk fades, but speculation continues about the next generation of House Democratic leaders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she’s “very confident” she retains the support of most members of her Democratic Caucus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One week after House Democrats finished 0-for-4 in this special election season, their burst of frustration and pique vented toward Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi appears to have fizzled.

The vexation is not going to fade away altogether, however, and neither will the lawmakers’ whispered talk in the cloakrooms or after their nightly fundraisers about which of them has a plausible shot at someday becoming Pelosi’s successor.

GOP Super PAC Plans to Go All In on Pelosi Attacks
Congressional Leadership Fund polling shows minority leader underwater

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi will continue to be targeted by outside groups to attack Democrats in 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

On the heels of a Republican victory in Georgia’s 6th District last week, the major GOP super PAC that played in that race is making known its plans to spend millions tying Democratic House candidates to Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in 2018.

The Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC backed by House GOP leadership, spent $7 million in the Georgia special election — much of it on attacks that tried to tie Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff to Pelosi. It launched similar attacks against the Democrat in the special election for Montana’s at-large district, which Republicans also won.  

Pelosi Blows Off Calls to Step Down
‘It's not up to them,’ she says of Democrats calling for new leadership

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi dismissed calls on Thursday for her to step down. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Describing herself as “worth the trouble,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi Thursday blew off calls from some chamber Democrats for her to step down from leadership in the wake of special election losses this year and a failure to win a House majority in four straight national elections. 

“It’s not up to them,” the California Democrat said of members calling for her to let someone else give it a try, before calling herself a “master legislator.”

Analysis: No Signs Baseball Shooting Will Change Hill’s Ways
Partisanship will prove stronger than promises of unity after House’s No. 3 GOP leader gravely wounded

Reps. Steve King of Iowa and Val B. Demings of Florida leave a congressional meeting about Wednesday’s shooting at the Republicans’ baseball practice in Alexandria, Va. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Don’t expect the congressional baseball practice shooting to change anything. Not the venomous partisanship that defines life at the Capitol. Not the public’s dismal opinion of the people they’ve sent to Washington. And certainly not the polarized impasse on gun control.

The torrent of words presaging something different began minutes after the shooting stopped Wednesday morning at the Republicans’ suburban practice field, with the third ranking leader of the House majority and four others grievously wounded. Across town, the Democrats halted their own early morning workout to huddle in prayer for their GOP colleagues. Groups advocating for tighter federal restrictions on firearms asserted hopefully that this time, the debate would shift in their favor.

Cuomo Wants to Unseat House Republicans, But Will It Work?
N.Y. governor targeting six GOP lawmakers who voted for health care bill

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, left, greets Rep. Joseph Crowley, a fellow New Yorker, at last year’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Democrats are looking to make gains in 2018 by winning competitive seats in New York — and the state’s governor, Andrew Cuomo, is stepping in to help. 

So far it’s not clear exactly how Cuomo plans to campaign against Republican incumbents and assist Democratic challengers. And some Republicans say that if Cuomo is publicly involved in these campaigns, his unpopularity in the Republican-leaning parts of the state could actually help GOP campaigns.