nancy-pelosi

Annual Capitol Insiders Survey: The Trump Effect
Tensions on the Hill from last year have carried over into 2017

Republicans staffers on Capitol Hill are still not comfortable with President Donald Trump, the latest Capitol Insiders Survey finds. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Last year’s election was humbling for pollsters, and the Capitol Insiders Survey was no exception. The vast majority of congressional staffers surveyed by CQ Roll Call in the days before the election — 91 percent — predicted a Hillary Clinton win. Only 6 percent thought Donald Trump could pull it off.

Still, the results reflect how Trump’s win blindsided the Washington establishment. The majority of Republican aides said consistently during the campaign that they wouldn’t vote for Trump.

Lessons of a "Shattered" Campaign
The Big Story, Episode 55

CQ Roll Call Columnist and co-author of "Shattered" Jonathan Allen, left, and CQ Roll Call Leadership Editor Jason Dick, right.

Democrats heading into the 2018 mid-term elections should pay attention to the party hubris that likely contributed to Hillary Clinton’s presidential loss, says Jonathan Allen, CQ Roll Call columnist and co-author of the best-selling book “Shattered."

Show Notes:

Opinion: Where Will GOP Be When the Crazy Train Comes Off the Rails?
Republicans blaming Nancy Pelosi and Democrats will only get them so far

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan and the Republicans can’t keep blaming Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats while ignoring President Donald Trump, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

If you want to know how Republicans will campaign in the 2018 midterm elections, you don’t have to wait. House Speaker Paul Ryan gave an early preview Monday night at a rally for Karen Handel, the Republican candidate in the runoff for Georgia’s 6th District seat. 

If you’re just tuning in to the race, Handel is a former Georgia secretary of state and would be the first Republican woman elected to Congress from the Peach State. She is running against Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old Democrat and former Hill staffer who nearly won the seat outright last month, when he received 48 percent of the vote. The suburban district is wealthy, highly educated, and newly politically turbulent. The longtime GOP stronghold went for President Donald Trump by just 1 percent in November.

Survey: Republicans See Harm From Freedom Caucus
GOP staffers also fault Trump’s temperament and approach to governing

House Freedom Caucus members, from left, Reps. Raúl R. Labrador of Idaho, Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Jim Jordan of Ohio, make their way to a procedural vote in the Capitol on March 24. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Freedom Caucus, the conservative House faction that stymied Republican efforts to repeal the health care law in March and, before that, upended the speakership of John A. Boehner, is deeply unpopular with the bulk of Republican staffers.

That, anyway, was the case among the respondents to the April Capitol Insiders Survey, CQ Roll Call’s email poll of congressional staff. Asked if the caucus was a positive or negative force for the party, 71 percent of GOP respondents said it was negative, while 22 percent said it was positive. The remainder were unsure.

Amidst Party Discord, EMILY’s List Makes Economic Case for Abortion Rights
Some Democrats argue for inclusion of anti-abortion candidates

EMILY’s List President Stephanie Schriock, seen here in 2010, said she doesn’t want the Democratic Party arguing over who its base is. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Saluting its leaders and its agenda Wednesday night, one of the biggest players in Democratic politics laid out her case for why the Democratic Party needs to remain an exclusively pro-abortion rights party.

“The most important economic decision many women will ever make is whether and when to have children,” said Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY’s List.

Opinion: An Opening for Reform
What do Democrats have to lose?

Democrats have ceded a lot of political turf to President Donald Trump and the Republican Party, Jonathan Allen writes.  (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Since Donald Trump shocked the world by winning the presidency in November, Democrats have had a tendency to bury their heads in the sand.

They want very badly to attribute their defeat to external factors, but the truth is they ceded a lot of basic political turf to Trump and his Republican Party in the last election. Their campaigns, up and down the ballot, had the feel of a party satisfied with communicating only to parts of the electorate that already agreed with them.

With Spending Deal Close, Trump Lambasts Democrats
Pelosi: Trump ‘projecting his own bad intentions’ in his Twitter rants

President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Thursday to blast Democrats just as the negotiations on a government funding bill are entering the most serious phase. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With less than 48 hours to avoid a government shutdown, President Donald Trump on Thursday voiced his opposition to including in a government funding bill two items that are vitally important for Democrats.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi reiterated Thursday morning that Democrats want a still-emerging spending measure for the rest of fiscal 2017 to include funds for financially struggling Puerto Rico. Democrats also say they have secured an agreement from the Trump administration to continue paying subsidies to health insurers — though Trump officials say those payments will not necessarily continue permanently.

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

GOP Super PAC Ties Montana's Rob Quist to Nancy Pelosi
Congressional Leadership Fund begins $800,000 media campaign

Screenshot

As national attention turns to the special election in Montana, the super PAC backed by House GOP leadership is deploying House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi in a new TV attack on Democratic nominee Rob Quist. 

The ad, which will debut Friday on broadcast and cable, marks the start of an $800,000 media buy from Congressional Leadership Fund. The super PAC ran its first TV ad against Quist last month, using many of the same attacks.  

Taunting Trump: Pelosi Challenges POTUS to Prove Claims
Top House Democrat lobs criticisms at get-out-of-town presser

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi slammed President Donald Trump for making unsubstantiated claims against officials in his predecessor’s administration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As the House prepared to skip town for its two-week April recess, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi used her get-out-of-town news conference to needle Republicans, in particular President Donald Trump, for unsubstantiated claims against senior Obama administration officials.

“How low can he go?” the California Democrat asked rhetorically.