mike-pence

Poll: Ryan Is Even Less Popular Than Trump
Only 29 percent of Americans approve of speaker’s performance

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan holds a lower job approval rating than President Donald Trump, according to a Pew Research Center study. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is very unpopular, but an even smaller percentage of Americans approves of the job House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is doing, a new poll shows.

The Pew Research Center survey released Monday shows that just 29 percent of Americans approve of Ryan’s performance. In contrast, 39 percent approve of Trump, whose approval ratings rank among the lowest of recent presidents at this point in their terms.

Trump Steps Into Closer-Than-Expected Kansas Special Election
National Republicans have made late investments in heavily GOP district

Kansas Treasurer Ron Estes is the Republican nominee in Tuesday’s 4th District special election. (Courtesy Kansas for Estes Facebook page)

It’s not often that a sitting Republican president, vice president, a former presidential candidate and senator and the speaker of the House make an effort days before a special election to hold what’s supposed to be a safe GOP seat. 

“Today, the eyes of the whole country are on Kansas,” Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said at a Monday rally for state Treasurer Ron Estes, the GOP nominee in the 4th District.

McConnell Open to Syria AUMF if Trump Says He Needs It
Senate majority leader also says strike not a signal of more to come

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office after the Senate invoked the “nuclear option” on Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would be open to looking at an authorization for the use of military force in Syria if President Donald Trump feels that additional force needs such authorization.

“I’d be interested in taking a look at an AUMF if the president feels like he needs it,” the Kentucky Republican said at a press conference Friday. “If the president can think of some AUMF that he thinks will strengthen his hand, I will take a look at it.”

Mike Pence: Congressional Buddy or Fixer?
Vice president enjoys goodwill, but his Hill role is evolving

Vice President Mike Pence, seen here with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, was hailed as President Donald Trump’s congressional point man, but he fell short on cutting a deal on health care last month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Vice President Mike Pence, Donald Trump’s often-celebrated chief liaison to Capitol Hill, failed in his first attempt at brokering a deal with Congress. And some House Republicans appear split on whether the White House should hand him a bigger role as they give a health care overhaul another try. 

Pence, who spent more than a decade in the House and was part of the GOP leadership team, was supposed to be Trump’s legislative get-things-done guy. Yet, so far, the vice president’s measurable legislative feats end with his votes, as president of the Senate, to break three volatile ties in that chamber.

Amash, Freedom Caucus Say Health Care ‘Deal’ Reports are False
Comes after some HFC members met with Pence and Priebus

House Freedom Caucus member Rep. Justin Amash, R-Michigan, shot down reports of a deal with the White House to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Justin Amash and the House Freedom Caucus say talks of a deal with the White House on tweaks to legislation that would repeal the 2010 health care law are premature.

Several HFC members suggested after a Monday meeting with Trump administration officials, including Vice President Mike Pence and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, that they would see a legislative outline of some of the administration’s proposed changes to their health care package on Tuesday.

Opinion: The S.S. Trump Is Sinking — Find a Lifeboat
An open letter to House Republicans

If they're smart, House Republicans will see that being tied to President Donald Trump is a recipe for defeat next year, Allen writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Dear Republican member of the House:

Run away from Donald Trump. Run hard. Run fast. And don’t look over your shoulder.

Trump Again Veers Into House, Senate Intel Investigators’ Lane
President shows no signs of concerns he’s trying to influence panel’s Russia probes

Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has reportedly asked for immunity in return for his testimony into alleged Russian meddling in U.S. elections. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Impinging upon a congressional investigation for the second time this week, President Donald Trump backed his former national security adviser’s quest for immunity in return for testimony before lawmakers.

The president tweeted Friday morning that Michael Flynn, the retired three-star general who was fired by the Obama administration then forced to leave the Trump White House at the start of its fourth week, should seek the legal protection because the probes into ties between Russia and his campaign associates is a “witch hunt” being conducted by the media and Democrats “of historic proportion.”

How The GOP’s Health Care Law Went Down
A play-by-play of one of the most momentous days in Trump’s presidency

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., approaches the podium to make a statement and take questions from reporters after he pulled the Republican bill to partially repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It was a nail-biter of a day with a photo finish.

The Republican Party’s seven-year effort to repeal the 2010 health care law ended with a thud Friday when the GOP decided not to even subject its do-or-die alternative to a vote.

Opinion: The GOP’s Big Health Care Winner — Mitch McConnell
House in flames but crisis avoided in the Senate

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell remains untarnished by the GOP effort to repeal the 2010 health care law, Allen writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

There’s exactly one big winner in the Republican leadership right now: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

The Kentucky Republican, long known for his sixth-sense acumen as a political and legislative strategist, completely avoided the direct and collateral damage of the GOP health care debacle of 2017.

Senators Working the Ref Already on Health Care Bill
Parliamentarian rulings could make or break GOP legislation

Sen. Bill Cassidy is among the senators looking to make sure any health legislation or amendments will comply with the Senate’s procedural rules. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

As House Republicans struggle to cobble together the votes to pass legislation to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, members are already looking to navigate the Senate’s labyrinth of procedural rules that could make or break the measure. 

Senate Democrats are already setting up for the battle with the parliamentarian about which provisions could run up against the Byrd Rule, which requires budget reconciliation bills that can pass with a simple-majority vote to be primarily about spending and revenues, without extraneous matter.